Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: cemetery

Jonah Williams.

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Jonah Williams, son of free woman of color Vicey Artis and her enslaved husband Solomon Williams, is buried in a now-overgrown cemetery near Eureka, Wayne County.

Matthew Aldridge.

ImageMATTHEW ALDRIDGE was the son of Robert and Mary Eliza Balkcum Aldridge. He is buried in Elmwood cemetery, Goldsboro.

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

Charles & Frances Wynn.

ImageCHARLES WYNN was born about 1842, probably in northern Duplin or southern Wayne County, to Levi Wynn and his wife, Bertha. FRANCES ALDRIDGE WYNN, probably born in southern Wayne County, was the daughter of John Matthew Aldridge and Catherine Boseman (or Simmons) Aldridge. They are buried in the cemetery of First Congregational Church, Dudley, Wayne County.

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

Marshall A. Carter.

ImageMARSHALL ARCHIE CARTER (or, perhaps, Archie or Archibald Marshall Carter, though his initials are shown as “M.C.” above) was born in 1860 to William Carter (1833-ca1875) and Mary Cox Carter (ca1830-??) of Sampson County. His father William was the son of Michael Carter (1805-ca1875) and his wife Patience.  Marshall Carter married Margaret Frances Jacobs.  They are buried in the First Congregational Church, Dudley, Wayne County.

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

In the 1860 census of Clinton, Sampson County: Wm. Carter, 26, farmer; wife Mary, 34; and children Cornelia, 12, Francenia, 6, Thos. G., 5, Sarah J., 2, and Archibald, 7 months.  Next door: Michael Carter, 57, and wife Patience, 47. All mulatto. [A duplicate listing in Piney Grove, Sampson County: William Carter, 27, turpentine laborer; wife Mary, 27; and children Cornelia, 12, Francenia, 6, Isaaih T., 4, Sarah J., 2, and Archy M., 6 months.]

This death certificate was filed in Wayne County: Marshall Carter. Died 11 July 1922, Dudley, Brogden, Wayne County. Colored. Farmer. Married to Frances Carter. Born 7 July 1860, Duplin County, to William Carter and Mary [last name unknown.] Buried in Dudley. Informant, Milford Carter, Mount Olive NC.

Mary B. Greenfield.

ImageMARY B. GREENFIELD was the daughter of Johnson and Harriet Smith Greenfield. She is buried in the Budd cemetery near Dudley, Wayne County.

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

In the 1860 census of Indian Springs, Wayne County: Johnson Greenfield, 52, farmer, wife Harriet, 36, and children Budd, 15, Ingram, 11, Giles, 9, Luther, 6, Dellelo, 4, Mary, 2, George, 2, and Marshal, 4 months.

Jesse Jacobs.

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JESSE ADAMS JACOBS (1817-1902) was born in Sampson or Cumberland County. His parentage is unclear. Circa 1845, he married Abigail Gilliam, who may have been white. The family lived in the Honeycutts area of Sampson County until the 1880s, when they migrated a few miles north to Dudley, Wayne County. Their children were: James Edward Jacobs, Elizabeth A. Jacobs Maynor, John R. Jacobs, Martha Jacobs, Solomon Jacobs, Jesse Adams Jacobs Jr., Abigail Jane Jacobs Brewington, and Margaret Frances Jacobs Carter.  Jesse is buried in the cemetery of the First Congregational Church in Dudley. “May the resurrection find thee on the bosom of thy God.”

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

Edward J. & Susan Henderson Wynn.

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EDWARD JAMES WINN (1838-1922) was the son of Gray Winn and Sarah “Sallie” Greenfield Winn.  His wife, SUSAN HENDERSON WYNN (1854-1907), was the daughter of James Henderson and Louisa Armwood Henderson. They are buried in a small family cemetery near Dudley in southern Wayne County.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

In the 1850 census of South Side of the Neuse, Wayne County: Sally Winn, 30, and children Betsey, 14, Edw’d J., 12, Eliza, 10, Penny, 6, Ally, 4, and Washington, 1.

In the 1860 census of Westbrooks, Sampson County: James Henderson, 52, wife Eliza, 25, and children Anna J., 8, Susan, 6, Hepsie, 4, and Alexander, 1.

[Sidenote: Edward Winn’s brother, Washington Francis “Frank,” married Susan Henderson’s sister Hepsie. — LYH]

Adam Toussaint Artis.

ImageADAM TOUSSAINT ARTIS died 94 years ago today.  His tombstone tilts, wedged between trees, in a tiny family plot on land still owned by his descendants near Eureka, Wayne County.

[Sidenote: He was my great-great-great-grandfather. — LYH]

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, 2011.

Ausborn and Mariah Dunstan.

The headstones of Ausborn Dunstan and wife, Maria Dunstan, are found in Row E of Rest Haven Cemetery, Wilson, North Carolina’s African-American cemetery.  Unless reinterred from Rountree cemetery –  the earlier graveyard serving Wilson’s black folks, abandoned circa 1950 – they are among the earliest burials in Rest Haven.

Though both were free-born, and accordingly not subject to legislation creating a path to legitimation of slave marriages, Orsborn Dunson and Mariah Monday registered their five-year marriage on 24 August 1866 in Wilson County.

In the 1860 census of Wilson, Wilson County:  Asburn Dunstan, 23, laborer, in the household of H.L. Winton, who kept a boarding house.

In the 1850 census of North Side of the Neuse, Wayne County: Moriah Munda, 9, black, listed as farmhand in the household of John G. Barnes, 33, white, farmer.

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