Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Month: July, 2013

She has been delivered of a colored child.

To the Honorable the General Assembly of North Carolina Now in Session,

The Humble Petition of Jacob Johnson Sheweth, That my wife Hannah has violated the marriage Vow, distinguished herself as an abandoned woman in point of Morals and Chastity, by having been delivered of a coloured child on the 4th day of January 1822, Since which time our conjugal embraces have entirely ceased. The which base action causes me your humble petitioner to Solicit your kind interference in giving me a final discharge from said Hannah.

Your Humble Petitioner further Sheweth that misfortunes in life has rendered me Unable to Apply for a divorcement in the way heretofore prescribed by an act of the General Assembly – That Honorable body who now alone is able to give Me redress. And your Humble Petitioner will ever Pray &c 27th Nov’r 1823. /s/ Jacob Johnson

We the under signed believe the above Stated grievances to be Undisputed facts and from long acquaintance know your Petitioner to have Supported a good Moral character.  /s/ Oscar Alston, Elisha Siler, Joshua Adcock, R. Freeman, Jesse, Bray, Henry Dorsett, Duty Dorsett

[Granted.]

General Assembly Session Records, November 1823-January 1824, Box 1, North Carolina State Archives.

He ill-treated, whipped and abused her, then took up with a slave.

North Carolina, Guilford County    }   Superior Court of Law, To Fall Term, A.D. 1866.

To the Honorable, the Judges of the said Court:

Mary Hubbard, of said County, by her petitioner, respectfully showeth unto your Honor, that she was born free and was intermarried, about twelve years ago, with a free man of color of the name of John Hubbard; that they obtained a license from the Clerk of the County Court of Alamance County and the rites of matrimony were solemnized between them by a Justice of the peace in said county; that your petitioner and her said husband, John Hubbard, lived together agreeably, and as man and wife should, for about three years; that during this time she was treated affectionately and kindly; that for some cause, to your petitioner then unknown, the said John Hubbard, her husband aforesaid, began to ill-treat, beat, whip and abuse your petitioner in such wise as to make her life oppressive and burthensome; that this abuse of your petitioner continued from that time, with short intervals when he was less cruel and unkind to her, now and then, up to about the first of September, A.D. 1865; that prior to that time and to your petitioner’s quitting her said husband’s house, her said husband, the aforesaid John Hubbard, became intimate with one Emily, a slave then and in property of one Tobias May, of Alamance, and, as your petitioner is advised and believes, her said husband had habitually illicit and adulterous intercourse with the said Emily; that for these reasons and for the further reasons that her life with him became intolerable and unendurable, she left him and hath not cohabited with him since that time; that she is advised and believes, that the said John Hubbard, her husband aforesaid, hath since kept up his illicit, adulterous and criminal intercourse aforesaid, with the said Emily May, who is now free, and he is illegally and improperly cohabiting with the said Emily at this time, contrary to law and in despite of his vows of chastity and fidelity to your petitioner, made and entered into at the time of their marriage; that your petitioner hath resided in this county for the last twelve years and ever since she was married, and now resideth here; that the course of action hath existed ever since last September, which is about ten and a half months; that your petitioner hath kept her vows of chastity and fidelity to her said husband, both before and since this parting; that she is now leading a correct and chaste life:

Your petitioner, for the reasons aforesaid, most respectfully prays your Honor, that the bonds of matrimony, now existing between her and the said John Hubbard, her husband aforesaid, may be dissolved, and that your petitioner may have such other and further relief as the nature of her case may require and to your Honor may see merit.  She further prayeth, that the said John Hubbard be served with a copy of this libel, and a subpoena, commanding the said John Hubbard to appear at the next term of this honorable Court, to be held for the County aforesaid, at the courthouse in Greensboro; on the Fourth Monday after the Fourth Monday of September next; then and there, to plead, or answer, to this libel, and to stand to, abide by and perform the order, claims and Judgments of this Court. And an in duty-bound she will ever pray.    Scott & Scott, Attos. for Petitioner.

Divorce Records, Guilford County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

To the evil example of all persons.

State of North Carolina, Chowan County   }

Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, August Term 1856

The jurors for the State in this oath present that Richard Wynns a free man of colour not a citizen of this State did on the first day of July 1856 migrate into the State to the Evil Example of all persons in the like case & contrary to the form of the Statute in such case made & provided    Hines, Solicitor

Chowan County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

Finally passed.

Legislature of North Carolina. SENATE.

Monday, Dec. 12. — …

…The bill to emancipate Isaac, a slave, finally passed, 65-to-46, and was ordered to be engrossed.

North Carolina Sentinel, New Bern, 21 December 1836.

In payment of Confederate taxes, no. 3.

Form of the estimate and assessment of agricultural products agreed upon by the assessor and tax-payer, and the value of the portion thereof to which the government is entitled, which is taxed in kind, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11 of “an Act to lay taxes for the common defence and carry on the government of the Confederate States,” said estimate and assessment to be made as soon as the crops are ready for market.

Mathew Aldridge

Cured Fodder     Quantity of gross crop. — 1000    Tithe or one-tenth. – 100    Value of one-tenth. — $3.00 

I, Mathew Aldridge of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina do swear that the above is a true statement and estimate of all the agricultural products produced by me during the year 1863, which are taxable by the provisions of the 11th section of the above stated act, including what may have been sold of consumed by me, and of the value of that portion of said crops to which the government is entitled.   /s/ Mathew X Aldridge

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the 3 day of December 1863, and I further certify that the above estimate and assessment has been agreed upon by said Mathew Aldridge and myself as a correct and true statement of the amount of his crops and the value of the portion to which the government is entitled.  /s/ J.A. Lane, Assessor.

Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, National Archives and Records Administration.

He releases the brute creation from many complaints.

To the worshipfull Court of the County of Perq’s Now Siting Greeting &c.

Whereas I have a Certain Negro Man named Francis which Nergroe I purchased about five years past Since which Time he hath demeaned himself as a faithfull Servant and hath from his Infancy been of an orderly life his knowledge & skil in Releasing the Brute Creation from Many Complaints which they are Insident to and his readiness to Serve the Citisens of his Neighbourhood ll taken in Veiw I consider Maritorious and Therefore Implore your attention to this particular case – beleiving that you will consider him worthy of that right which the Laws of out State allow in certain cases (which is Liberation. – firmly beleiving that If he should meet with your Sanction in this case that he would be of material Servise in the Neighbourhod. I am desirous that you in your good wisdom may emancipate him the said Francis & that his name may be caled Francis N. Bundy and as in duty Bound Your Petitioner wil pray &c. May 13th 1806 /s/ Benjamin Bundy

We the Subscribers being wel acquainted with the within named Frank do believe that it would be Great Justice for him to be emancipated as he is a Servisable Negroe in the Neighbourhood who answers the description within mentioned.  /s/ Pha’s Nixon, Josiah Robinson, Thomas Church, Samuel Weekes Jr., Enoch Newby, Charles Overman, John Overman, Josiah Muncey

The above Petition is Granted by the Court.  /s/ Ch’s W. Blount

Slave Records, Perquimans County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

The peculiar circumstances: the husband might become a slave of his children.

To the Honorable the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina now in Session – The Petition of Lovedy Henderson a free woman of color, respectfully represents that your Petitioner intermarried some years since with a certain man of color by the name of Horace, then a slave, but with the consent of his owner. That since their marriage by care and industry, she has been enabled to purchase her said husband at the price of Eight Hundred & Seventy dollars of Hugh and John G. McLaurin Executors of Duncan McLaurin deceased.  That she has paid the purchase money & has a Bill of Sale duly executed by the said Executors. That your Petitioner now has two children by her said Husband & as by possibility her husband might become the slave of her children, your petitioner is induced to ask the interference of your honorable body, as the only tribunal authorized to grant the relief prayed for. Your Petitioner would not presume to ask this indulgence in her favour, in contravention to the policy of the Laws of the Land, but from the peculiar circumstances of her case & the belief that she will be enabled to establish for her Husband such a Character as to entitle him to the favourable notice of your honorable body. For this, she relied on the certificates of highly respectable gentlemen both in Fayetteville & the City of Raleigh, where they have lived since their intermarriage. Your Petitioner therefore prays the passage of an Act, emancipating her said husband Horace Henderson, and she in duty bound will ever pray &c. /s/ Lovdy Ann Henderson

We Hugh McLaurin & John C. McLaurin Executors of Duncan McLaurin dec’d unite in soliciting the passage of an Act for the emancipation of Horace Henderson as prayed for by his wife and we are free to say that we have long known said Horace who is a Barber and a boy of unexceptionable good character and of industrious & moral habits.   /s/ H. MacLaurin for himself and John C. MacLaurin

We the undersigned citizens of Fayetteville freely unite in soliciting the General Assembly to pass an Act emancipating the negro man Horace, that we have known said Horace as a Barber & a Boy of good character, industrious habits and as we believe of the strictest integrity.  /s/ J.H. Hooper, John MacRae, John Kelly, Thos. L. Hybart, [illegible] Cochran, John Lippitt, D.A. Saltmarsh, Chas. B. Jones, [illegible] Hawley, William S. Latta, Jas. Huske, Duncan Smith, Henry W. Ayer

We the undersigned citizens of Raleigh freely unite in soliciting the General Assembly to pas an Act emancipating the negro man Horace, that he has lived in the place for the last three or four years as a Barber, and has conducted himself with the utmost propriety, that in his deportment he is humble & polite, free as we believe from any improper intercourse with slaves, industrious & honest.  /s/ M. Stokes, R.M. Saunders, Jo. Gales, B.W. Daniel, Geo. Simpson, J. Brown, John Primrose, Hazlett Wyle, Richard Smith, S. Birdsall, Jno. G. Marshall, A. Williams, Fabius J. Haywood, Robert Staniroy

General Assembly Session Records, November 1832-January 1833, Box 5, North Carolina State Archives.

In the 1850 census of Greensboro, Guilford County: Horace H. Henderson, 40, barber, and wife Love, 39, both born in Fayetteville; children James, 18, farmer, Mary Ann, 17, and Timothy, 14, born in Raleigh; and Albert, 10, Sarah, 8, Thomas, 4, and Alexander, 3, born in Greensboro; all mulatto.

[Sidenote: Ninety years after this petition, a Horace Henderson was born into my extended family, but I know no connection between my Hendersons, originally of Onslow County, and Lovedy Ann Henderson. — LYH]

The Armwoods get certified and paid.

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During the Civil War, free men of color were conscripted to build breastworks on North Carolina’s southern coast. After filing claims, the Armwoods were paid for their two weeks of service — minus the cost of a furnished blanket.

In the 1850 census of Southern District, Sampson County: John Armwood, 50, laborer; Susan, 30; Henderson, 25; Louisa, 20; Henry, 16; Richard, 15; and John Armwood, 13. In the Northern District: James Winn, 33; Buckner L.Bryan, 14; Zachariah Bryan, 13; and Owen Armwood, 24.

Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, National Archives and Record Administration.

Surnames: Surry County, 1850.

The following surnames are found among free people of color in Surry County:

BAKER, BLALOCK, EASLEY, EMANUEL, FOWLER, HARDY, HEDGEPETH, HOWARD, HUDSON, JACKSON, MELTON, MURRAY, NOAH, PARKER, PLESS, RANDLE, REVELS, SHANKLE, VOLENTINE, and WIMBERLY.

Simmons the bridge tender?

The official bond of Buckner Simmons, in the sum of $1000 (W.J. Warner and S.C. Kane sureties), as bridge tender was read from the President’s desk and approved. Subsequently the approval was reconsidered, whatever that may amount to, because somebody discovered that Mr. Simmons had never been even nominated to be a bridge tender. Evidently he was one of the innumerable army of office seekers who had a sure thing on an appointment and had taken time by the forelock got his bond, had it approved by the solicitor as to legality and sufficiency and chucked it in somewhere among council documents so that in the course of time it was dug up and blindly approved by the new council of civil service reformers and economists. Mr. George Warner asked how the bond came before the council. President Everett said he didn’t know but it came into his hands through the regular channel – not explaining what it was. Mr. Warner retorted that “it must be a great channel.”

Plain Dealer, Cleveland OH, 22 May 1877.