Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Category: Newspapers

His papers have never been seen.

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Tarborough Southerner, 15 May 1852.

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NOTICE.

$10 Reward.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, on the 1st day of April, 1852, a mulatto fellow named Jerry Manly, as he calls himself, and says that he is a free man, but his papers have never been seen. Said boy is 30 or 32 years old, and has a free woman for his wife — the woman is well known by the name of Nancy Reed, she has a sister in the neighborhood for Tarboro’, and Logsboro’, and no doubt they are lurking in that vicinity. The boy was raised in the town of Louisburg, N.C., and has a mother and several brothers in that place. The above reward will be paid for his delivery to the undersigned at Rocky Mount, or any jail so that I can get him again.  S.D. Armstrong.

Rocky Mount, April 3rd, 1852.

In the 1850 census of Nash County: Nancy Reed, 32, with Betsey, 16, Mary, 6, and William Reed, 7 months, plus Matilda Cross, 29, all mulatto.

She had been ailing for some years.

FOUND DEAD.

Coroner Jones held an inquest on yesterday, over the body of a free negro woman, named Betsey Hagan, aged about 60 years, found dead on the lot of Mr. J.W. Potter, in the Eastern portion of the town. It appears that the woman lived in a small house on Mr. P’s lot, and that early in the morning, as himself and brother came out of his house, they found the woman lying dead in the yard. She had been “ailing” for some years, and it is supposed, that in going out that morning to attend to some duty, she fell dead. The verdict of the Jury was that she came to her death from natural causes.

Wilmington Daily Journal, 9 September 1860

Committed on suspicion.

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Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 8 March 1858.

In the 1850 census of Northwest, Brunswick County: cooper Henry Patrick, 24, wife Hester, 24, and children Anne, 2, and William, 4 months. Next door: cooper William Patrick, 47, wife Sophia, 55, and Ezekiel, 23, Massa, 17, Mildred, 16, Benjamin, 2, and Margaret Patrick, 9 months.

In the 1850 census of Northwest, Brunswick County: Elias Freeman, 59, wife Abby, 50, and children Celia, 21, Prucilla, 20, Joshua, 21, William, 20, Jesse, 16, John, 12, Mary, 10, and Eliza Freeman, 4, plus Julia Jacobs, 10.

In the 1850 census of Northwest, Brunswick County: Henry Jacobs, 43, wife Mary, 42, and children Eli, 18, Sylvany, 11, Mary, 15, Betsy, 9, Eliza, 7, and Jerry Jacobs, 4.

Praying for the emancipation.

Notice!

Is hereby given to all persons, that I shall proceed to file a petition in the next Superior Court to be held for the County of Iredell, at the Court-House in Statesville, on the Sixth Monday after the Fourth Monday in August, A.D. 1859, praying for the Emancipation of the following slaves, to wit: Lindsay and his wife Lucy, and their two children, Lindsay Walton and Louisa and her child Lucy Adelaide. ABNER FEIMSTER Aug. 22, 1859

Iredell Express, 26 August 1859.

Bright mulatto boy with one thumb.

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$10 REWARD.

A REWARD of Ten dollars will be paid for the apprehension and delivery to me or his confinment in any Jail so that I get him, of my boy Lafayett Tucker a bright mulatto boy about thirteen years of ago, 4 feet 6 or 8 inches high, light bushy head of hair, with the thumb off of his left hand, who was bound to me by the County Court of Nash, some years since, and ranaway from me on the 15th July. It is supposed that he is lurking in the neighborhood of Nashville or Enfield all persons are forwarned against employing, harboring, aiding or assisting said boy in any manner whatever under the penalty of the law.    JAMES TUCKER.  Hilliardston, N.C.  July 11th, 1860.

Wilson Ledger, 20 November 1860.

In the 1850 census of Nash County, North Carolina: farmer Matthew Jones, 66, wife Nancy, 40, and children Elias, 16, Adaline, 14, and Mary, 6, plus Amanda Tucker, 23, and Laffyette Tucker, 4.

She had been ailing for some years.

Found Dead.

Coroner Jones held an inquest on yesterday, over the body of a free negro woman, named Betsey Hagan, aged about 60 years, found dead on the lot of Mr. J.W. Potter, in the Eastern portion of the town. It appears that the woman livef in a small house on Mr. P’s lot, and that early in the morning , as himself and his brother came out of his house o, they found the woman lying dead in the yard. She had been “ailing” for some years, and it is supposed, that in going out that she came to her death from natural causes.

Wilmington Daily Journal, 9 September 1860.

His razors are of the first quality.

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Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 10 January 1827.

New Barber Shop.

“Act well your part, there all the honor lies.”

HORACE HENDERSON respectfully informs the gentlemen of Fayetteville, and the public generally, that he has taken the shop on Gillespie street formerly occupied by D. Ochiltree, Esq. and nearly opposite the State Bank, where the above business will be carried on in all its various branches. He flatters himself that from the circumstance of his having been born and raised in Fayetteville, his known habits of industry and sobriety, to merit and receive a liberal share of patronage. His Razors and other materials are of the first quality and shall always be kept int he best order.

Fayetteville, January 10, 1827.

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Horace Henderson was enslaved, though he lived much like a free man. His wife Lovedy Henderson  petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly for his freedom in 1832.

Hat tip to Gabby Faith for the clipping.

Life on Underwood Settlement.

“John Underwood, a “free Negro” living on a farm he owned in pre-Civil War Vigo County, took part in the dangerous work of helping fugitive slaves flee the United States to Canada as part of the “Underground Railroad.”

“On one occasion, slave catchers discovered what Underwood was doing and “were threatening to do [him] bodily harm,” according to John W. Lyda’s book, “The Negro in the History of Indiana.” But Underwood, a member of the local Masonic lodge “saved himself by giving the Masonic Recognition sign. As those who were threatening him were themselves members of that lodge, they desisted from injuring him,” Lyda wrote.

“This story is one of few that remain from what was once a thriving black settlement in Linton Township in southern Vigo County. Settled by [North Carolina-born] John Underwood in about 1841, it was one of dozens of free, black settlements in Indiana that existed many years before the Emancipation Proclamation was signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. It became known as the Underwood Settlement. …”

See Arthur Foulkes, “Life on Underwood Settlement,” Terre Haute Tribune Star, 13 February 2011.

[Hat tip to Edie Lee Harris.]

Stout built mulatto girl ran away.

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Five Cents Reward.

RAN AWAY from the Subscriber, on the 29th of August last, an indented mulatto girl, named

TEMPE JONES,

In the 20th year of her age, 5 feet 4 or 5 inches high, stout built, and bright yellow complexion. The above reward, but no charges, will be paid on her apprehension and delivery to the Subscriber. All persons are hereby forbid harboring or employing said girl under penalty of the law. STEPHEN HARPER.

Sept. 11, 1832.

North Carolina Free Press, 2 October 1832.

He stole his indentures.

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Tarboro Free Press, 4 May 1833.

$5 Reward.

RAN AWAY from the Subscriber, on Sunday night last, an indented apprentice, a colored boy, named

WILLIS HAMMONDS,

Aged about 16 years, tolerably stout built, bright complexion and bushy head. His grandmother is a free woman named Olive Hammonds, and lives in Halifax county, where I expect Willis will try to get, as he has several other connections in that county. Said boy stole his indentures, and will probably try to pass himself with them as free. The above reward will be paid for his recovery, if delivered to me, in Edgecombe county, near Col. Benj. Sharpe’s, or secured in any jail so that I can get him. All persons are forbid harboring or employing said boy, under penalty of the law.  WILLIAM BROWN.

April 9, 1833.