Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Month: February, 2016

Bright mulatto boy with one thumb.



A REWARD of Ten dollars will be paid for the apprehension and delivery to me or his confinment in any Jail so that I get him, of my boy Lafayett Tucker a bright mulatto boy about thirteen years of ago, 4 feet 6 or 8 inches high, light bushy head of hair, with the thumb off of his left hand, who was bound to me by the County Court of Nash, some years since, and ranaway from me on the 15th July. It is supposed that he is lurking in the neighborhood of Nashville or Enfield all persons are forwarned against employing, harboring, aiding or assisting said boy in any manner whatever under the penalty of the law.    JAMES TUCKER.  Hilliardston, N.C.  July 11th, 1860.

Wilson Ledger, 20 November 1860.

In the 1850 census of Nash County, North Carolina: farmer Matthew Jones, 66, wife Nancy, 40, and children Elias, 16, Adaline, 14, and Mary, 6, plus Amanda Tucker, 23, and Laffyette Tucker, 4.

She had been ailing for some years.

Found Dead.

Coroner Jones held an inquest on yesterday, over the body of a free negro woman, named Betsey Hagan, aged about 60 years, found dead on the lot of Mr. J.W. Potter, in the Eastern portion of the town. It appears that the woman livef in a small house on Mr. P’s lot, and that early in the morning , as himself and his brother came out of his house o, they found the woman lying dead in the yard. She had been “ailing” for some years, and it is supposed, that in going out that she came to her death from natural causes.

Wilmington Daily Journal, 9 September 1860.

His razors are of the first quality.

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Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 10 January 1827.

New Barber Shop.

“Act well your part, there all the honor lies.”

HORACE HENDERSON respectfully informs the gentlemen of Fayetteville, and the public generally, that he has taken the shop on Gillespie street formerly occupied by D. Ochiltree, Esq. and nearly opposite the State Bank, where the above business will be carried on in all its various branches. He flatters himself that from the circumstance of his having been born and raised in Fayetteville, his known habits of industry and sobriety, to merit and receive a liberal share of patronage. His Razors and other materials are of the first quality and shall always be kept int he best order.

Fayetteville, January 10, 1827.


Horace Henderson was enslaved, though he lived much like a free man. His wife Lovedy Henderson  petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly for his freedom in 1832.

Hat tip to Gabby Faith for the clipping.