Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Bright mulatto boy with one thumb.

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$10 REWARD.

A REWARD of Ten dollars will be paid for the apprehension and delivery to me or his confinment in any Jail so that I get him, of my boy Lafayett Tucker a bright mulatto boy about thirteen years of ago, 4 feet 6 or 8 inches high, light bushy head of hair, with the thumb off of his left hand, who was bound to me by the County Court of Nash, some years since, and ranaway from me on the 15th July. It is supposed that he is lurking in the neighborhood of Nashville or Enfield all persons are forwarned against employing, harboring, aiding or assisting said boy in any manner whatever under the penalty of the law.    JAMES TUCKER.  Hilliardston, N.C.  July 11th, 1860.

Wilson Ledger, 20 November 1860.

In the 1850 census of Nash County, North Carolina: farmer Matthew Jones, 66, wife Nancy, 40, and children Elias, 16, Adaline, 14, and Mary, 6, plus Amanda Tucker, 23, and Laffyette Tucker, 4.

She had been ailing for some years.

Found Dead.

Coroner Jones held an inquest on yesterday, over the body of a free negro woman, named Betsey Hagan, aged about 60 years, found dead on the lot of Mr. J.W. Potter, in the Eastern portion of the town. It appears that the woman livef in a small house on Mr. P’s lot, and that early in the morning , as himself and his brother came out of his house o, they found the woman lying dead in the yard. She had been “ailing” for some years, and it is supposed, that in going out that she came to her death from natural causes.

Wilmington Daily Journal, 9 September 1860.

His razors are of the first quality.

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Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 10 January 1827.

New Barber Shop.

“Act well your part, there all the honor lies.”

HORACE HENDERSON respectfully informs the gentlemen of Fayetteville, and the public generally, that he has taken the shop on Gillespie street formerly occupied by D. Ochiltree, Esq. and nearly opposite the State Bank, where the above business will be carried on in all its various branches. He flatters himself that from the circumstance of his having been born and raised in Fayetteville, his known habits of industry and sobriety, to merit and receive a liberal share of patronage. His Razors and other materials are of the first quality and shall always be kept int he best order.

Fayetteville, January 10, 1827.

——

Horace Henderson was enslaved, though he lived much like a free man. His wife Lovedy Henderson  petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly for his freedom in 1832.

Hat tip to Gabby Faith for the clipping.

Nathan Blackwell’s will and desire.

this the 24th of January 1845 }   this my desire and will that I give to Josiah and Nathan Axum Andrew & all my property to be Equally divided and I want Asberry Blackwell to take Andrew and see to his labor for my children to the best advantage also take my children and take care of them and satisfy himself for his troble out of my property this my Last will and testament whereunto I now set my han and Seal to        Nathan (X) Blackwell {seal}

Test  James F. Mercer, Thomas Mercer

Nathan Blackwell received a marriage license to marry Jincey Powell on 15 December 1838 in Nash County, North Carolina. Elijah Powell and Henry Bount were bondsmen, and B.H. Blount, a witness.

In the 1840 census of Nash County, North Carolina, Nathan Blackwell headed a household comprised of one free colored male, aged 10-23; one free colored female, aged 10-23; and two free colored males under 10. In the 1850 census of Nash County, Asberry Blackwell [likely Nathan’s brother] lived alone.

Nathan’s children are not found in the 1850 census. In 1860, Josiah Blackwell, 21, was listed as a steam mill laborer in the household of engineer John Valentine. On 27 March 1861, Josiah married Becky Mitchell at Wiley Lamm’s steam mill. In 1860, Nathan E. Blackwell, 20, is listed as a wagoner living in the household of farmer Robinson Baker in Wilson County.

North Carolina Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database on-line], ancestry.com.

Life on Underwood Settlement.

“John Underwood, a “free Negro” living on a farm he owned in pre-Civil War Vigo County, took part in the dangerous work of helping fugitive slaves flee the United States to Canada as part of the “Underground Railroad.”

“On one occasion, slave catchers discovered what Underwood was doing and “were threatening to do [him] bodily harm,” according to John W. Lyda’s book, “The Negro in the History of Indiana.” But Underwood, a member of the local Masonic lodge “saved himself by giving the Masonic Recognition sign. As those who were threatening him were themselves members of that lodge, they desisted from injuring him,” Lyda wrote.

“This story is one of few that remain from what was once a thriving black settlement in Linton Township in southern Vigo County. Settled by [North Carolina-born] John Underwood in about 1841, it was one of dozens of free, black settlements in Indiana that existed many years before the Emancipation Proclamation was signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. It became known as the Underwood Settlement. …”

See Arthur Foulkes, “Life on Underwood Settlement,” Terre Haute Tribune Star, 13 February 2011.

[Hat tip to Edie Lee Harris.]

Stout built mulatto girl ran away.

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Five Cents Reward.

RAN AWAY from the Subscriber, on the 29th of August last, an indented mulatto girl, named

TEMPE JONES,

In the 20th year of her age, 5 feet 4 or 5 inches high, stout built, and bright yellow complexion. The above reward, but no charges, will be paid on her apprehension and delivery to the Subscriber. All persons are hereby forbid harboring or employing said girl under penalty of the law. STEPHEN HARPER.

Sept. 11, 1832.

North Carolina Free Press, 2 October 1832.

Give her of the fruit of her hands.

Lydia, daughter of Theopolis Miller Winslow, was born March 7, 1846, and died Oct. 27, 1913. When she was but a child her mother died and she was raised in a family of Friends, living with them until she was united in marriage to Parker Jones. To them were born four children, George, Mattie, William and Daniel. Three are still living, George, Mattie and Daniel, with several grandchildren and many relatives and friends to mourn their loss. William died when a child. Her husband died twelve years ago. She belonged to the A.M.E. church at Dublin, and while not a constant attendant, she carried within her breast that hidden treasure, that quiet peace, which the world knoweth not of. She was strictly honest and truthful in all her dealings. It was her greatest pleasure to make her home happy. Her children rise up and call her blessed, and her husband did praise her. Give her of the fruit of her hands and let her own works praise her in the gates.

Funeral services at the home Wednesday afternoon by the Rev. Baker, of Muncie, and Rev. Hill, the local pastor. Burial in Capital Hill.

Cambridge (Indiana) City Tribune, 30 October 1913.

He stole his indentures.

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Tarboro Free Press, 4 May 1833.

$5 Reward.

RAN AWAY from the Subscriber, on Sunday night last, an indented apprentice, a colored boy, named

WILLIS HAMMONDS,

Aged about 16 years, tolerably stout built, bright complexion and bushy head. His grandmother is a free woman named Olive Hammonds, and lives in Halifax county, where I expect Willis will try to get, as he has several other connections in that county. Said boy stole his indentures, and will probably try to pass himself with them as free. The above reward will be paid for his recovery, if delivered to me, in Edgecombe county, near Col. Benj. Sharpe’s, or secured in any jail so that I can get him. All persons are forbid harboring or employing said boy, under penalty of the law.  WILLIAM BROWN.

April 9, 1833.

Highland County, Ohio, Register of Blacks.

Perquimans County, North Carolina. I, David White of the said county one of the Trustees of the yearly meeting of Friends of North Carolina by power vested in me by Sampson Lawrence of same county , have removed to Highland County , Ohio a negro man named Smith White, dark complexion, middle size, about 27 years of age and his wife, Louisa and her child Elizabeth, all who belonged to Sampson Lawrence above named, Louisa about 20 years of age. That these persons ave been manumitted to manage themselves. 12th day, 10th month, 1825. /s/ David White. Wit: Nathan Hunt. Rec. 7-15-1836, Highland Co., Ohio.

In the 1840 census of Fairfield, Highland County, Ohio: Smith White is head of a household that includes one male aged 24-35, one male under 10, one female aged 55-100, one female aged 24-25 and three females under 10; all free persons of color. Per findagrave.com, Smith White died 26 April 1849 and is buried in Fairfield Quaker cemetery, Leesburg, Highland County.

Jane White, Perquimans County, North Carolina. I, David White of said county and state as agent or trustee for the yearly meeting of Friends of North Carolina and by authority vested in me, manumit and set free a negro woman, Jane, dark complexion, about 49 years of age and her daughter, Louisa about same colour, aged 20 years, and her son, Bartlet about 10 years old. Also Louisa’s John. That they are now in Highland County, Ohio having left this county in 1834 under control of Thaddeus White and William Nixon, dated 13th day, 10th month, 1835.  /s/ David White. Wit: Nathan hunt. Recorded 7-15-1836 Highland Co., Ohio.

Perquimans County, North Carolina. I, David White of said county and state, agent or trustee for the yearly meeting of Friends of North Carolina by authority vested in me, do manumit and set free a woman of colour named Winney Lamb and her three children: Elizabeth, Thomas and Louisa; also, Theophelus Winslow now in Wayne County, Indiana, he is about 27 years old, 6 feet high, tolerably dark complexion and is the son of Betty Winslow of Highland County, Ohio. Said Winney Lamb is a low woman of yellow complexion about 42 years old and with her children are now in Highland County, Ohio. That they left this state in 1834 under the care of Thaddeus White and William Nixon, dated 13th of 10th month, 1835. /s/ David White. Wit: Nathan Hunt. Recorded 7-15-1836 Highand Co., Ohio.

In the 1840 census of Washington, Wayne County, Indiana, Theophilus Winslow headed a household of two persons of color. On 20 August 1838, he received a land grant of 80 acres in Wayne County, Indiana. On 4 November 1838, he married Milly Anderson in Wayne County. Records show that he was a member of Milford Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends. In the 1850 census of Washington, Wayne County, Indiana: 40 year-old North Carolina-born farm Theophilus Winslow, wife Milly, 40, and daughter Lydia, 6. In the 1880 census of Dublin, Wayne County, Indiana: Theophilus Winslow, 72, wife Martha, 64, and “friend” Harriet Wallace, 70.

Perquimans County, North Carolina. I, David White of said county and state, as agent or trustee of the North Carolina Friends Yearly Meeting  and by power as their agent, have removed to Highland County, Ohio, a negro woman, Edith Rutcliff, aged about 40 years and her son, Amzel, commonly called Amzel Watkins aged 20 years, middle size swings himself greatly when he walks, have manumitted these persons with full liberty to do for themselves. 12th of 10th month, 1835. /s/ David White. Wit: Nathan hunt. Rec. 7-15-1836.

Possibly, Amzel Watkins, 1113 Ohio, who is listed in the 1865 edition of Gopsill’s Pennsylvania State Business Directory as a variety store owner in Philadelphia.

Perquimans County, North Carolina. I, David White of said county and state as agent or trustee for the yearly meeting of Friends of North Carolina by power as their agent manumit and set free the following people of colour now in Highland County, Ohio, namely: Betty Winslow aged about 50 years, her sons: Joseph Winslow, Robinson, Henry, Alfred and John and daughter Mary Ann, they having left this state in 1834 under the care of Thaddeus White and Wm Nixon. Said Joseph is about 24 years, very dark in colour, middle size. Robinson is of middle size, of dark complexion and 22 years old. Henry is tall, then and yellow complexion, about 20 years of age. Alfred is about 15 years of age. John is about 8 years old and Mary Ann is about 14 years old. Dated this 13th day of 10th month 1835. /s/ David White. Wit: Nathan hunt. Rec. 7-14-1836.

Perquimans County, North Carolina. I, David White of said county and state as agent and trustee for the yearly meeting of Friends of North Carolina by power as their agent have removed to Highland County, Ohio, a certain negro woman named Patience the wife of Daniel White and their five children — Nancy, Wiley, Smith, Peter and Mary; also, the above named Daniel White whom I bought of Jonathan White of Perquimans Co., North Carolina and do manumit all said persons from slavery. Daniel White is aged about 35 years, yellow complexion and a stout make; his wife, Patience, is about 30 years of age and a shade darker than her husband, 12th of 10th month, 1835. /s/ David White. Wit: Nathan Hunt. Rec. 7-15-1836.

That Robert Peele and Thomas I. Outland of Northampton County, North Carolina being legally authorized and empowered by trustees of the yearly meeting of the Society of Friends of North Carolina take charge and convey to the State of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, Turner Peele together with a number of other colored people held by said trustees, said Robert Peele and Thomas I. Outland having removed and placed said Turner Peele together with a number of others in Highland County, Ohio and that said Turner Peele is a free man, dated this 1st day of 12th month, 1836. Recorded 8-11-1837.

In the 1850 census of Fairfield, Highland County, Ohio: 37 year-old North Carolina-born Turner Peal and wife Julia A. Peal, 27. In the 1870 census of same: Turner Peal, 57, wife Julia A., 45, and children Minover, 22, and Edward P., 16, plus James Hays, 10, and Laura West, 3.

Perquimans County, North Carolina. Before me, Jonah Perry one of the Justices of the Peace for said county came Nathan Winslow and deposeth that he knew Harrison Winslow a man of color of said county to be free born about 21 years of age, rather of a dark complexion, 5 feet 6 inches high with a small scar over the right eye. Dated 10th January 1838. Recorded 1-2-1842.

Highland County, Ohio. Personally appeared before me Augustus Brown a Justice of the Peace for said county, John Bolt who saith that he was well acquainted with Jerry Oldham and Asa, his son, both men of color in the state of North Carolina and that they were the property of his father, Charles Bolt, and that they gave him their freedom and they have been set free from Nov. 28, 1826 as by certificate, dated Jan. 17, 1840. Certificate: This is to certify that I have the negroes Jerry and Asa Oldham liberty to go with my son, William, to Ohio, dated Nov. 28, 1826. /s/ Charles Bolt. Rec. 2-28-1840.

Jeremiah Oldham is listed as a head of household in the 1830 and 1840 censuses of Fairfield, Highland County, Ohio. In the 1850 census of Wayne, Clinton County, Ohio: Virginia-born Asa Oldham, 30, with children Elizabeth J., 5, and Andrew, 2. In the 1900 census of Van Buren, Shelby County, Ohio: 80 year-old widower Asa Oldham and boarder John Powell, 41.

Highland County, Ohio. Leesburgh. That Samuel White and Ormond White by power of attorney executed to them by David White of Perquimans County, North Carolina and Joseph Parker of Pasquotank County, North Carolina trustees of the yearly meeting of the Society of Friends, brought and set at liberty, Luke Wislow and Levina his wife to enjoy freedom of the state of Ohio as may appear more fully by records of Henry County, Indiana, where the power of attorney is recorded, dated this 12th day, 10th month, 1841.

——

Register of Blacks, Highland County, Ohio, Office of Clerk of Court, Hillsboro, Highland County, Ohio; federal population schedules; U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907 [database on-line], ancestry.com; Men’s Minutes, 1845-1864, Indiana Yearly Meeting Minutes Collection, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana (U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935 [database on-line], ancestry.com)

Did unlawfully live as man and wife.

State of North Carolina, Wilson County to wit:

Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions January Term AD 1859

The Jurors for the State on their oath present that Benjamin Price a free negro late of the County of Wilson on the 1st day of December AD 1858 and divers other days and times both before and after that day at and in the county aforesaid did unlawfully cohabit & live as man & wife with Easter a slave the property of Dempsey Barnes contrary to the form of the statute in such cases made & provided and against the peace & dignity of the state.    /s/ B.B. Barnes Sol

[Reverse: State vs Ben Price A Slave for Wife / Gov Pros Wit Dempsey Barnes  / Not a true Bill W.E.J. Shallington For’n Grand Jury]

Miscellaneous Records, Wilson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

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