Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

She had been ailing for some years.

FOUND DEAD.

Coroner Jones held an inquest on yesterday, over the body of a free negro woman, named Betsey Hagan, aged about 60 years, found dead on the lot of Mr. J.W. Potter, in the Eastern portion of the town. It appears that the woman lived in a small house on Mr. P’s lot, and that early in the morning, as himself and brother came out of his house, they found the woman lying dead in the yard. She had been “ailing” for some years, and it is supposed, that in going out that morning to attend to some duty, she fell dead. The verdict of the Jury was that she came to her death from natural causes.

Wilmington Daily Journal, 9 September 1860

Committed on suspicion.

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Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 8 March 1858.

In the 1850 census of Northwest, Brunswick County: cooper Henry Patrick, 24, wife Hester, 24, and children Anne, 2, and William, 4 months. Next door: cooper William Patrick, 47, wife Sophia, 55, and Ezekiel, 23, Massa, 17, Mildred, 16, Benjamin, 2, and Margaret Patrick, 9 months.

In the 1850 census of Northwest, Brunswick County: Elias Freeman, 59, wife Abby, 50, and children Celia, 21, Prucilla, 20, Joshua, 21, William, 20, Jesse, 16, John, 12, Mary, 10, and Eliza Freeman, 4, plus Julia Jacobs, 10.

In the 1850 census of Northwest, Brunswick County: Henry Jacobs, 43, wife Mary, 42, and children Eli, 18, Sylvany, 11, Mary, 15, Betsy, 9, Eliza, 7, and Jerry Jacobs, 4.

Praying for the emancipation.

Notice!

Is hereby given to all persons, that I shall proceed to file a petition in the next Superior Court to be held for the County of Iredell, at the Court-House in Statesville, on the Sixth Monday after the Fourth Monday in August, A.D. 1859, praying for the Emancipation of the following slaves, to wit: Lindsay and his wife Lucy, and their two children, Lindsay Walton and Louisa and her child Lucy Adelaide. ABNER FEIMSTER Aug. 22, 1859

Iredell Express, 26 August 1859.

Particulars for the funeral.

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Funeral bill for Anna Henderson Simmons, who died in Logansport, Cass County, Indiana, on 16 June 1906.

Anna H. Simmons was a native of Wayne County, North Carolina. Contrary to information shown in this document, her parents were James Henderson and Eliza Armwood Henderson. Anna’s husband Montraville Simmons was born in Duplin or Wayne County, North Carolina, in 1839 to John Calvin Simmons and Hepsie Whitley Simmons. The family migrated to Ontario, Canada, in the 1850s.

In the 1850 census of South Side of Neuse, Wayne County, North Carolina: farmer Calvin Simmons, 42, wife Hepsey, 46, and children Harriet, 13, Susan, 11, Montrival, 9, Jno. R., 7, Margaret, 5, Dixon, 3, and Geo. W., 1, plus Robt. Aldridge, 26, who worked as a hireling. 

In the 1860 census of Westbrooks, Sampson County, North Carolina: James Henderson, mulatto carpenter; wife Eliza; and four children, Anna J., Susan, Hepsie, and Alexander

Copy of funeral bill courtesy of Kroeger Funeral Home, Logansport, Indiana.

Bright mulatto boy with one thumb.

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$10 REWARD.

A REWARD of Ten dollars will be paid for the apprehension and delivery to me or his confinment in any Jail so that I get him, of my boy Lafayett Tucker a bright mulatto boy about thirteen years of ago, 4 feet 6 or 8 inches high, light bushy head of hair, with the thumb off of his left hand, who was bound to me by the County Court of Nash, some years since, and ranaway from me on the 15th July. It is supposed that he is lurking in the neighborhood of Nashville or Enfield all persons are forwarned against employing, harboring, aiding or assisting said boy in any manner whatever under the penalty of the law.    JAMES TUCKER.  Hilliardston, N.C.  July 11th, 1860.

Wilson Ledger, 20 November 1860.

In the 1850 census of Nash County, North Carolina: farmer Matthew Jones, 66, wife Nancy, 40, and children Elias, 16, Adaline, 14, and Mary, 6, plus Amanda Tucker, 23, and Laffyette Tucker, 4.

She had been ailing for some years.

Found Dead.

Coroner Jones held an inquest on yesterday, over the body of a free negro woman, named Betsey Hagan, aged about 60 years, found dead on the lot of Mr. J.W. Potter, in the Eastern portion of the town. It appears that the woman livef in a small house on Mr. P’s lot, and that early in the morning , as himself and his brother came out of his house o, they found the woman lying dead in the yard. She had been “ailing” for some years, and it is supposed, that in going out that she came to her death from natural causes.

Wilmington Daily Journal, 9 September 1860.

His razors are of the first quality.

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Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 10 January 1827.

New Barber Shop.

“Act well your part, there all the honor lies.”

HORACE HENDERSON respectfully informs the gentlemen of Fayetteville, and the public generally, that he has taken the shop on Gillespie street formerly occupied by D. Ochiltree, Esq. and nearly opposite the State Bank, where the above business will be carried on in all its various branches. He flatters himself that from the circumstance of his having been born and raised in Fayetteville, his known habits of industry and sobriety, to merit and receive a liberal share of patronage. His Razors and other materials are of the first quality and shall always be kept int he best order.

Fayetteville, January 10, 1827.

——

Horace Henderson was enslaved, though he lived much like a free man. His wife Lovedy Henderson  petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly for his freedom in 1832.

Hat tip to Gabby Faith for the clipping.

Nathan Blackwell’s will and desire.

this the 24th of January 1845 }   this my desire and will that I give to Josiah and Nathan Axum Andrew & all my property to be Equally divided and I want Asberry Blackwell to take Andrew and see to his labor for my children to the best advantage also take my children and take care of them and satisfy himself for his troble out of my property this my Last will and testament whereunto I now set my han and Seal to        Nathan (X) Blackwell {seal}

Test  James F. Mercer, Thomas Mercer

Nathan Blackwell received a marriage license to marry Jincey Powell on 15 December 1838 in Nash County, North Carolina. Elijah Powell and Henry Bount were bondsmen, and B.H. Blount, a witness.

In the 1840 census of Nash County, North Carolina, Nathan Blackwell headed a household comprised of one free colored male, aged 10-23; one free colored female, aged 10-23; and two free colored males under 10. In the 1850 census of Nash County, Asberry Blackwell [likely Nathan’s brother] lived alone.

Nathan’s children are not found in the 1850 census. In 1860, Josiah Blackwell, 21, was listed as a steam mill laborer in the household of engineer John Valentine. On 27 March 1861, Josiah married Becky Mitchell at Wiley Lamm’s steam mill. In 1860, Nathan E. Blackwell, 20, is listed as a wagoner living in the household of farmer Robinson Baker in Wilson County.

North Carolina Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database on-line], ancestry.com.

Life on Underwood Settlement.

“John Underwood, a “free Negro” living on a farm he owned in pre-Civil War Vigo County, took part in the dangerous work of helping fugitive slaves flee the United States to Canada as part of the “Underground Railroad.”

“On one occasion, slave catchers discovered what Underwood was doing and “were threatening to do [him] bodily harm,” according to John W. Lyda’s book, “The Negro in the History of Indiana.” But Underwood, a member of the local Masonic lodge “saved himself by giving the Masonic Recognition sign. As those who were threatening him were themselves members of that lodge, they desisted from injuring him,” Lyda wrote.

“This story is one of few that remain from what was once a thriving black settlement in Linton Township in southern Vigo County. Settled by [North Carolina-born] John Underwood in about 1841, it was one of dozens of free, black settlements in Indiana that existed many years before the Emancipation Proclamation was signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. It became known as the Underwood Settlement. …”

See Arthur Foulkes, “Life on Underwood Settlement,” Terre Haute Tribune Star, 13 February 2011.

[Hat tip to Edie Lee Harris.]

Stout built mulatto girl ran away.

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Five Cents Reward.

RAN AWAY from the Subscriber, on the 29th of August last, an indented mulatto girl, named

TEMPE JONES,

In the 20th year of her age, 5 feet 4 or 5 inches high, stout built, and bright yellow complexion. The above reward, but no charges, will be paid on her apprehension and delivery to the Subscriber. All persons are hereby forbid harboring or employing said girl under penalty of the law. STEPHEN HARPER.

Sept. 11, 1832.

North Carolina Free Press, 2 October 1832.