Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Fayetteville

His razors are of the first quality.

Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 8.49.44 PM

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 10 January 1827.

New Barber Shop.

“Act well your part, there all the honor lies.”

HORACE HENDERSON respectfully informs the gentlemen of Fayetteville, and the public generally, that he has taken the shop on Gillespie street formerly occupied by D. Ochiltree, Esq. and nearly opposite the State Bank, where the above business will be carried on in all its various branches. He flatters himself that from the circumstance of his having been born and raised in Fayetteville, his known habits of industry and sobriety, to merit and receive a liberal share of patronage. His Razors and other materials are of the first quality and shall always be kept int he best order.

Fayetteville, January 10, 1827.


Horace Henderson was enslaved, though he lived much like a free man. His wife Lovedy Henderson  petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly for his freedom in 1832.

Hat tip to Gabby Faith for the clipping.

A more honest, straightforward old man never lived.

Old Abel Payne‘s house, on the corner of Moore and Orange streets, has been torn down. This house though small and old, was once the residence of Abel Payne, a free colored man, who years ago was held in high esteem by the citizens of our town. A more honest, straightforward old man never lived, and his influence for good among the colored people will long be remembered.

Fayetteville Observer, 11 June 1885.

Very industrious, good morals … however.

A Valuable Negro Man for Sale.

ON the 4th day of June next, in the Town of Fayetteville, at public Auction, I shall offer for sale, a negro man of middle age, very industrious and of good morals, a painter by Trade. He is known by the name of WILEY P. LASSITER, a free man of color; he has been free all his life till recently, when he made himself a Slave to me, by Indenture, for the consideration of my endorsing a considerable amount of debt for him, and having it to pay. I have allowed him free privileges, as he formerly had, for more than two years, that he might redeem himself, but finding this course unavailing, I shall necessarily resort to the above. Terms will be made known on day of sale.   EMSLEY LASSITER.  May 5, 1858.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 17 May 1858.

His half-brother — and owner — are free men of color.


RANAWAY from the Subscriber, on the 19th inst., a Negro man named LUKE, about five feet six or eight inches high, dark complected, has a scar on the side of one of his eyes, (which one not recollected, but believed to be the right eye,) stout built, weighs about 175 or 180 pounds.

He was purchased in 1846 from Mr. Josiah E. Bryan of this town. He has relatives in the County of Sampson, among them a half-brother named Sam Boon, — a free man of color, — and may possibly be lurking in that neighborhood, as I am informed he was seen about there a short time since. Possibly he may have obtained free papers, and is endevouring to escape to a free State, as I understand some free persons of color removed from Sampson county last week to Indiana.

A reward of Ten Dollars will be given for his apprehension and delivery to me, if taken in this county; Fifteen Dollars if taken in any other county in this State and lodged in a safe Jail; or Fifty Dollars if taken out of state — so that I get him again.  M.N. LEARY.

Fayetteville, March 29, 1853.

Fayetteville Observer, 7 April 1853.


He strove to entice.

A Free Negro Entices a Slave to Runaway

Kit Huffman, a free negro who was tried for murder last spring in our Court, has enticed a boy, the property of Wm. Cade, Esq., of this place, to run away with him and go North. It seems that for some time past he had been striving to entice two of Mr. Cade’s boys (brothers) away, and prevailed upon one to do so. Kitt was up here on Wednesday, but left in the boat for Wilmington, just one hour before the officer arrived at the wharf. It is expected that he will leave the boat at White Hall or some place between this and Wilmington, and meet the boy at some place before arranged upon. Kitt is a bright mulatto, about 5 feet 11 inches or 6 feet high. The citizens of this and adjoining counties ought to keep good look out for them. – Fay. Carolinian.

Wilmington Daily Herald, 20 February 1860.

The horrid deed.

MURDER. – An inquest was held by coroner Scott over the body of a free negro named Chaves, who was found murdered on the Fayetteville road, several miles from this city, on Friday morning last. His death was caused by a frightful wound extending from the groin upwards towards the bowls, which was doubtless made by a knife. The testimony before the coroner’s jury, we learn, implicates a free negro named Jordan, and a free woman in the horrid deed. The woman has been lodged in jail, but the man has not been taken.

The North-Carolina Star (Raleigh), 8 November 1854.

To leave Fayetteville as soon as I possibly can.


The North Carolinian, 23 August 1851.

Despite his firm-toned notice, Lewis Levy does not seem to have left Fayetteville after all. Well after the publication of this ad, he bought land in town, and his 1876 Southern Claims Commission statement asserts that he lived three miles from Fayetteville and owned nearly 200 acres in Cumberland County.


Runaway bound boy, no. 20.

Five Cents Reward.

ABSCONDED from the Subscriber, on the 19th ult.. a bound boy named Absalom Revels. – He is a very bright mulatto, about 14 years of age. All persons are cautioned against harboring him. The above reward, and no thanks, will be given for his delivery to me. DAVID SHAW. Fayetteville, August 4.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 11 August 1836.

Both were drunk.

On Wednesday afternoon, John Lomack, a free man of color about 60 years old, was arraigned on the charge of killing his son, Roland Lomack. The evidence showed that both father and son were drunk – that Roland went to his father’s house and after quarreling for some time and drinking together, got into a fight, and that during the struggle the old man stabbed the son in the left breast, from which wound he died after walking about 50 yards from the house. After the evidence, with the consent of counsel on both sides the Judge directed the Jury to return a verdict of manslaughter, which they did, and Lomack was sentenced to be branded and imprisoned for [blank] months.

The North-Carolinian (Fayetteville), 17 May 1856.

Sailing for Liberia.

FOR LIBERIA. – We learn from an Agent of the Colonization Society, now here, that a vessel will sail on the 20th Nov. from Wilmington, for Liberia, and that about 80 free colored people from this place and neighborhood, intend to take passage in her. – Fayetteville Observer.

Republican and Patriot (Goldsboro), 26 October 1852.