Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Fayetteville

Blame it on the grog shop!

Attempt to Murder. – On Monday evening last, the citizens of the heart of our town were alarmed by loud cries of Murder! On repairing to the spot, it was found that a coloured man named Ephraim Hammond, had been struck on the head with a brick, by which his skull was shockingly fractured. Suspicion having attached to two white men, named Frederick Jones and Allen Rowell, they were taken up, and after examination, fully committed for trial. There is little or no hope of Hammond’s surviving the injury.

It would be improper to detail any of the circumstances connected with this horrid affair, except to state, that it appears to have been produced by an occurrence on the same evening, at a gambling table at one of those sinks of iniquity, a Grog shop! kept by one of the prisoners, and in the same building recently occupied by Wm. M. Anderson, who, only six weeks ago, vacated it to take up his abode in Jail for the murder of Madison Allen.

When will our County Court do its duty towards the suppression of these nuisances? – Fayetteville Observer.

The People’s Press (Wilmington), 2 February 1838.

He flatters himself that he can shave and trim hair easily and fashionably.

The North Carolina Legislature freed Joseph Hostler during its 1833-1834 session. He did not waste time:ImageFayetteville Weekly Observer, 27 January 1835.

Image Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 15 May 1839.

ImageThe North-Carolinian (Fayetteville), 16 February 1850.

Runaway bound boy, no. 15.

Five Cents Reward.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, a few weeks since, an indented Apprentice by the name of EPHRAIM BURNETT; he is a dark complected colored boy, 15 to 16 years of age. Whoever will apprehend and deliver the said Boy to me in Fayetteville, shall be entitled to the above reward, but no thanks or charges. All persons are forbid harboring or employing him in any manner whatever.  JAMES BAKER. September 8, 1834.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 23 December 1834.

Runaway bound boy, no. 13.

RUNAWAY

From the Subscriber on the 5th inst., an indentured colored boy named JIM WESLEY, about 15 years old. He is a bright mulatto, and has a downcast look when spoken to. Persons are cautioned against harboring or employing him. Anyone arresting the boy and returning him to me at Fayetteville will be liberally rewarded.   DAVID McDUFFIE. July 28th, 1855.

The North-Carolinian (Fayetteville), 4 August 1855.

The new firm.

NOTICE.

The Subscriber having associated himself in business with his son Matthew, the business will hereafter be conducted under the name and style of M.N. Leary & Son.

The undersigned, thankful for the liberal patronage hitherto extended to him, respectfully solicits a continuation of the same in behalf of the new Firm.

All those indebted to the undersigned, either by debt or account, are earnestly requested to settle the same as early as possible.  M.N. LEARY, Fayetteville, June 2, 1852.

Fayetteville Semi-Weekly Observer, 22 July 1852.

He sold me a free man as a slave.

$50 REWARD,

WILL be paid for the apprehension and confinement, so that he may be brought to justice, of WRIGHT ALLEN, who commonly calls himself Wm. Allen, who sold to me as a slave, a free mulatto boy named DENNIS. Said Allen is a very stout man, dark complexion, about 40 years of age, has an uncommon large hand and nose, the hand very covered with hair. I will give $200 reward for the recovery of the $500 which I paid Allen for the negro, or in proportion for any part of it. He carried with him from Fayetteville about ten days ago, a tall bright mulatto free woman named Mary, and it has been ascertained that they went North together by way of the Wilmington Rail Road. He wore a grey coatee with outside pockets without flaps, a black silk hat, made by J.R. & D. Gee, of Fayetteville, whose names are in the hat; his own name also is worked in the hat with yellow silk. Any information addressed to the Subscriber will be promptly attended to. DANIEL McKINNON. Stewartsville, Richmond County, N.C., November 27, 1838.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 28 November 1838.

 

Runaway bound boy, no. 12.

RANAWAY

FROM me, in October last, HENRY MARTIN, a free boy of color, about 18 years of age. The said Martin is a bound apprentice to me. All persons are hereby forbid harboring or trusting him on my account. Any person so doing will be prosecuted to the extent of the law. J.G. SMITH Fayetteville, Dec’r 6, 1856.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 8 December 1856.

Negro candidates, their pedigrees and general character.

NEGRO CANDIDATES.

We requested our friends, a few days ago, to send us, from all parts of the State, the names of negro candidates in the State for the several offices, their pedigrees and general character. These statements begin to come in. A friend in Fayetteville sends us the following:

“NEGRO CANDIDATES IN CUMBERLAND: For House of Representatives, Isham Swett, free mulatto of old issue; Barber by trade; went with 1st Regt. N.C. Vols. (Confederate) in the capacity of a servant.

John Leary – free mulatto, old issue; Saddler by trade. His father, also free mulatto, formerly owned slaves and sold them. One of his brothers was in the raid with John Brown and was killed at Harper’s Ferry.”

If our friends will comply with our request as above, we shall have an interesting chapter of the practical working and character of Radicalism.

Semi-Weekly Raleigh Sentinel, 18 April 1868.

 

Armwoods on the lam.

$200 Reward!

Stop the Thieves and runaway Mulattoes.

WHEREAS, sometime ago, Jemima Armwood, a free mulatto woman, for the sum of $200, (to enable her to purchase her husband, named Richard, or commonly called Dick Youngblood, well known in Barnwell District, So. Ca.) bound three of her Girls, named Becky, about 17 years old, Teena, about 14, and Darcas, about 12, to me, to serve as indented servants, and on Thursday, the 8th instant, they inveigled them from my service and removed to parts unknown, taking them my three servants; they besides committed several acts of swindling, theft, outrages, and other rogueries, to myself and others, — such as stealing my sulkey and harness, and selling them in Hamburg, S.C., on the 7th instant; and on the 8th, assaulting and beating a white man, a respectable old gentleman; and many other villainies too numerous to be here inserted.

A reward of $200 dollars will be paid for apprehending the said Jemima, her husband Dick, Becky, Teena, and Darcas, and deliver them to me, or in the Augusta Jail. They have besides five smaller children, one a sucking baby, and may probably have their son, named Daniel, about 22 years of age, all mulattoes, 10 or 11 in number. They started with a cart and a white blind mare; the cart is an uncommon one, it has a very large new body nailed to the shafts, the wheels are from an old gig, originally painted green, but dirty – the axletree of the cart is wood, and the ends that goes in the wheels are iron. Dick is short, about 40 or 50 years of age, illiterate but keen, artful, and well acquainted with the world – most any subject can furnish him with grounds on which to build plausible stories, to secure in his favor the sympathy of others; (and girls are known to be prolific subjects.) Therefore, in order, if possible to counteract his cunning, and as I am not known at a distance, let it be known that I am a married man, with wife and seven small children, the oldest only ten years. I employed the three girls in nursing my small children, and to no other work, and never whipped them; but Dick gave Teena a most unmerciful whipping on the 8th instant, for not robbing me according his directions, and may probably place that whipping too, to my credit, in order to enlist the feelings of others in his favor. – They have been traced to Fayetteville, N.C., and arrived there between the 18th and 26th February. JOHN GUIMARIN, Watch Maker, No. 171, Broad Street. Augusta, Geo. Feb. 23, 1827.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 3 May 1827.

That greatest curse.

DROPPED DEAD. – A free mulatto named Dick Gee dropped dead in the streets on Thursday last – another victim of that greatest curse of the human race, intemperance, which annually sends so many thousands to the grave. So says the Fayetteville Carolinian.

The Daily Delta (New Bern), 17 May 1859.