Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Category: Kinfolk

A wealthy and worthy colored citizen.

Napoleon Hagans, a wealthy and worthy colored citizen, died Monday night.  He will be greatly missed by the entire community.

Headlight, Goldsboro, 27 Aug 1896.

Next generation marriage.

ImageCandis Locust‘s birth was the subject of a bastardy action by the State on behalf of Waity Locust against Calvin Hagans. Louisa Wilson’s parents were John “Jack” Wilson and Zilpha Artis (herself the daughter of Vicey Artis and Solomon Williams.) Louisa’s brother, William Wilson, stood as witness.

Marriage Records, Register of Deeds Office, Wayne County Courthouse, Goldsboro.

Her freedom has never been disputed.

State of North Carolina Onslow County

To all persons whom it may concern we the under Signed being called on to State what we Know concernning the Freedom of Nancy dove formerly Nancy Henderson do certify that Nancy Ann Henderson the Mother of the said Nancy Dove was a Free born white Woman and that the Freedom of the said Nancy Dove never has been disputed given under our hands this 3rd March 1860  /s/ John Mills {seal} Nancy Parker {seal}

Test J.W. Thompson X

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March Term 1860

Then was the above certificate proven in open Court by J.W. Thompson  /s/ Harvey(?) Cox

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State of North Carolina Onslow County   } Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions March Term 1860

Then was the foregoing Certificate of John Mills and Nancy Parker duly proved in open Court by the Oath of Jonathan W. Thompson and Ordered to be registered  /s/ Jasper Etheridge

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State of North Carolina, Onslow County   } Registered in due form of law, April 14th 1860 – Book No 29, Folio 48.  /s/ Z.M. Coston Regr

Slave Records, Onslow County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

[Sidenote: Nancy Henderson, also known as Nancy Dove, was the sister of my great-great-great-great-grandmother, Patsey Henderson.  –LYH]

Napoleon Hagans house.

ImageNapoleon Hagans (1840-1896) built this house near the south bank of Aycock Swamp, near Fremont in northern Wayne County, between 1870 and 1885. “The house, a single-pile center-hall-plan dwelling, has retained much of its charming original hip-roofed front porch, now supported by replacement square columns. Windows are surmounted by moulded peaked arch surrounds. … One original single-shouldered exterior end chimney was plastered; the other was replaced by a concrete-block flue. …” A stone monument marking the graves of Napoleon and his wife Apsilla Ward Hagans stands in a cornfield about one hundred yards west of the house.

Detail from J. Daniel Pezzoni and Penne Smith, Glimpses of Wayne County, North Carolina: An Architectural History (1998).

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2010.

First Congregational Church.

“History of the First Congregational Church of Dudley, North Carolina, Given by Mr. General Washington Simmons, born December 22, 1856.”

In 1867, after Emancipation, came the first school for Dudley, taught four months by a white confederate soldier, John P. Casey, who was paid by the community families. The only textbook was the “blue-back speller.”

George Washington Simmons, father of General W. Simmons, corresponded with Mr. James O’Hara in Wilmington, Delaware, though whom the services of another white friend, Miss Jane Allen of Delaware, were secured for another two months’ session. She, too was paid by families.

From Oberlin College in 1868, came D.C. Granison, 23 or 24 years of age, the first Negro teacher, who remained for two years, residing in the home of George Washington Simmons. … His correspondence with the A.M.A. brought visitors in 1870, among whom were many to be remembered, especially Rev. D.D. Dodge, at that time pastor of the First Congregational Church in Wilmington, North Carolina. With his guidance our first Sunday School was organized. After several visits, he sent Rev. John Scott of Naugatuck, Connecticut, who began work in 1870. …

Just after Rev. Scott’s ordination, the First Congregational Church of Dudley was organized in what is known as the old “mission home.” … Charter members of the church were George Washington Simmons, James King, Levi Winn Sr., Levi Winn Jr., Henry Winn, George Winn, and members of their families. The first converts were Charity Faison and Sylvania Simmons. They were baptized in the “Yellow Marsh Pond” just north of the cemetery. …

Volume II [of the church records] summarizes the history from March 9, 1870. … The list of members, dating from 1870, is divided by male and female. It includes the names of Frank Cobb, William Aldridge, Bryant Simmons (Sr. and Jr.), John Aldridge, Lewis Henderson, Levi Wynn, Richard Brunt, Amos Bowden, Charles Boseman, M.A. Manuel, Solomon Jacobs, George Washington Simmons, …

From the souvenir bulletin of the 100th Anniversary, First Congregational Church United Church of Christ, 1870-1880.

Copy of bulletin in possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

In the 1860 census of Indian Springs, Wayne County: George Simmons, 40, wife Axey J., 38, and children Riley B., 19, Simon, 15, Susan A., 17, George R., 13, Zack, 10, Silvania, 9, Bryant, 7, H.B., 5, and Gen., 2. 

In the 1860 census of Buck Swamp, Wayne County: James King, 47, wife Susan, 27, George, 9, James H., 8, Jerome, 4, John, 2 months, and Polly A., 2.

In the 1860 census of Buck Swamp, Wayne County: Levi Winn, 47, blacksmith, wife Elizabeth, 39, and children Henry, 21, David, 20, Pinkney, 19, George, 17, Charles, 15, Mary, 13, Martha, 11, John, 9, Elizabeth, 7, Susan, 5, and Levi, 3.

In the 1860 census of Buck Swamp, Wayne County: Matthew Aldridge, 50, wife Catharine, 28, and children William, 10, John H., 16, Frances, 7, Delia, 3, and Mary A., 1, with James Boseman, 26. 

In the 1860 census of Westbrooks, Sampson County: Robert Aldridge, 32, farmer, wife Mary E., 27, and children George W.,7,  John, 5, Amelia, 4, Matthew L., 3, David S., 2, and a one month-old infant.

In the 1860 census of Westbrooks, Sampson County: Lewis Henderson, 25, turpentine laborer, wife Margaret, 26, and children Lewis T., 4, James L., 3, and Isabella J., 4 mos. 

In the 1860 census of Dismal, Sampson County: Faraba Manuel, 60, farmer (widow), and children Gidens, 33, Michael A., 23, Eden, 21, John, 19, William H., 16, Enoch, 14, and Nancy, 12, plus Lemuel Manuel, 60. 

In the 1860 census of Honeycutts, Sampson County: Jesse Jacobs, 43, farmer, wife Abba, 41, and children Edward J., 14, Betsey A., 13, John R., 11, Martha, 8, Solomon, 6, Jesse, 4, and Abba J. Jacobs, 6, plus William, 10, Eliza, 8, and John Jacobs, 6.

Edward J. & Susan Henderson Wynn.

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EDWARD JAMES WINN (1838-1922) was the son of Gray Winn and Sarah “Sallie” Greenfield Winn.  His wife, SUSAN HENDERSON WYNN (1854-1907), was the daughter of James Henderson and Louisa Armwood Henderson. They are buried in a small family cemetery near Dudley in southern Wayne County.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

In the 1850 census of South Side of the Neuse, Wayne County: Sally Winn, 30, and children Betsey, 14, Edw’d J., 12, Eliza, 10, Penny, 6, Ally, 4, and Washington, 1.

In the 1860 census of Westbrooks, Sampson County: James Henderson, 52, wife Eliza, 25, and children Anna J., 8, Susan, 6, Hepsie, 4, and Alexander, 1.

[Sidenote: Edward Winn’s brother, Washington Francis “Frank,” married Susan Henderson’s sister Hepsie. — LYH]

John W. Aldridge.

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JOHN WILLIAM ALDRIDGE (1853-1910) was born in Sampson County to Robert Aldridge and Mary Eliza Balkcum Aldridge. In the 1870s, he and his brothers Mathew Aldridge and George Aldridge were among former free men of color hired to teach in Wayne County colored schools. (Another was E.E. Smith.) John and George were posted near Fremont, in northern Wayne County, where John met and married one of his students, Louvicey Artis.  The couple settled among his family near Dudley, in southern Wayne County.  The original site of John’s grave is now forgotten, but he now lies in a family cemetery on land still owned by Aldridge descendants. (The W on the headstone is a bit of a mystery, but suggests that the marker was second-hand.  The spelling of his surname, “Aldrich,” is that preferred by his son, Thomas, who paid for it.)

Joshua & Amelia Aldridge Brewington.

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JOSHUA BREWINGTON, son of Raiford Brewington and Bathsheba Manuel Brewington, was born in 1846 in Sampson County and died in 1931 in Wayne County.  His wife, AMELIA ALDRIDGE BREWINGTON, daughter of Robert Aldridge and Mary Eliza Balkcum Aldridge, was born in 1855 in Sampson County and died in 1895 in Wayne County. They are buried in the cemetery of the First Congregational Church, Dudley, North Carolina. “Sleep on and take thy rest.”

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, 2010.

Adam Toussaint Artis.

ImageADAM TOUSSAINT ARTIS died 94 years ago today.  His tombstone tilts, wedged between trees, in a tiny family plot on land still owned by his descendants near Eureka, Wayne County.

[Sidenote: He was my great-great-great-grandfather. — LYH]

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, 2011.

Frances C. Aldridge Randall.

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FRANCES C. “Fannie” ALDRIDGE RANDALL, born 1872 in Wayne County, married Robert H. Locust (1859-after 1930, later known as George Randall) in 1890, and died in Washington DC in 1917. She was the daughter of Robert and Mary Eliza Balkcum Aldridge, and sister of, among others, Mathew W. Aldridge and George W. Aldridge.

Photo courtesy of F.R. Randall.