Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Craven County apprentices, 1811.

On 11 March 1811, James Culley, 8, and William Culley, 5, boys of color, were bound to William Dove as coopers.

On 11 March 1811, Hetty Carter, William Carter, Sarah Carter and Isaac [no last name] were bound to William Physioc , the girls as spinsters, the boys as coopers.

On 11 March 1811, Peggy Ives, a girl of color aged 12 years, was bound to Michael Guillet as a trunk maker.

On 12 March 1811, John Herman, 7, and Jacob Herman, 10, were bound to John C. Stanly as shoemakers.

On 10 June 1811, Simon Clark, a free boy of color aged 13 years, was bound to Shadrack Gatlin as a cooper.

On 11 June 1811, [no name], a free boy of color aged 8 years, was bound to Gideon Jones as a cooper.

On 11 June 1811, Rachel Mosely, 11,and Charles Moseley, 15, were bound to William Gooding as a spinster and blacksmith, respectively.

On 11 June 1811, Daniel Mosely, a free boy of color aged 8 years, was bound to John Gooding as a cooper.

On 11 June 1811, Mary Mosely, a free girl of color aged 13 years, was bound to Ephraim Standland as a spinster.

On 9 September 1811, Charles Mosely, 16, and John Mosely, 2, free boys of color, were bound to Donum Montford as plasterers.

On 9 September 1811, Betsey Mosely, 6, Mary Ann Mosely, 16, and Rachel Mosley, 14, free girls of color, were bound to Lydia Mosely as spinsters.

On 9 September 1811, Daniel Mosely, a free boy of color aged 10 years, was bound to John Dewey as a carpenter and joiner.

On 10 December 1811, Jim Moore, an orphan aged 17 years, was bound to John C. Stanly as a carpenter.

On 13 December 1811, Nathan Chapman, a free boy of color aged 14 years the 16th day of May next, was bound to William Green as a carpenter.

No tax, no teaching.

29. No county court shall tax any free person of color for the support and maintenance of common schools; and no person descended from negro ancestors to the fourth generation inclusive, shall be taught in said schools.

From Chapter 27, Public and Private Laws of North Carolina Passed by the General Assembly 1854-55, State Library of North Carolina.

First Congregational Church.

“History of the First Congregational Church of Dudley, North Carolina, Given by Mr. General Washington Simmons, born December 22, 1856.”

In 1867, after Emancipation, came the first school for Dudley, taught four months by a white confederate soldier, John P. Casey, who was paid by the community families. The only textbook was the “blue-back speller.”

George Washington Simmons, father of General W. Simmons, corresponded with Mr. James O’Hara in Wilmington, Delaware, though whom the services of another white friend, Miss Jane Allen of Delaware, were secured for another two months’ session. She, too was paid by families.

From Oberlin College in 1868, came D.C. Granison, 23 or 24 years of age, the first Negro teacher, who remained for two years, residing in the home of George Washington Simmons. … His correspondence with the A.M.A. brought visitors in 1870, among whom were many to be remembered, especially Rev. D.D. Dodge, at that time pastor of the First Congregational Church in Wilmington, North Carolina. With his guidance our first Sunday School was organized. After several visits, he sent Rev. John Scott of Naugatuck, Connecticut, who began work in 1870. …

Just after Rev. Scott’s ordination, the First Congregational Church of Dudley was organized in what is known as the old “mission home.” … Charter members of the church were George Washington Simmons, James King, Levi Winn Sr., Levi Winn Jr., Henry Winn, George Winn, and members of their families. The first converts were Charity Faison and Sylvania Simmons. They were baptized in the “Yellow Marsh Pond” just north of the cemetery. …

Volume II [of the church records] summarizes the history from March 9, 1870. … The list of members, dating from 1870, is divided by male and female. It includes the names of Frank Cobb, William Aldridge, Bryant Simmons (Sr. and Jr.), John Aldridge, Lewis Henderson, Levi Wynn, Richard Brunt, Amos Bowden, Charles Boseman, M.A. Manuel, Solomon Jacobs, George Washington Simmons, …

From the souvenir bulletin of the 100th Anniversary, First Congregational Church United Church of Christ, 1870-1880.

Copy of bulletin in possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

In the 1860 census of Indian Springs, Wayne County: George Simmons, 40, wife Axey J., 38, and children Riley B., 19, Simon, 15, Susan A., 17, George R., 13, Zack, 10, Silvania, 9, Bryant, 7, H.B., 5, and Gen., 2. 

In the 1860 census of Buck Swamp, Wayne County: James King, 47, wife Susan, 27, George, 9, James H., 8, Jerome, 4, John, 2 months, and Polly A., 2.

In the 1860 census of Buck Swamp, Wayne County: Levi Winn, 47, blacksmith, wife Elizabeth, 39, and children Henry, 21, David, 20, Pinkney, 19, George, 17, Charles, 15, Mary, 13, Martha, 11, John, 9, Elizabeth, 7, Susan, 5, and Levi, 3.

In the 1860 census of Buck Swamp, Wayne County: Matthew Aldridge, 50, wife Catharine, 28, and children William, 10, John H., 16, Frances, 7, Delia, 3, and Mary A., 1, with James Boseman, 26. 

In the 1860 census of Westbrooks, Sampson County: Robert Aldridge, 32, farmer, wife Mary E., 27, and children George W.,7,  John, 5, Amelia, 4, Matthew L., 3, David S., 2, and a one month-old infant.

In the 1860 census of Westbrooks, Sampson County: Lewis Henderson, 25, turpentine laborer, wife Margaret, 26, and children Lewis T., 4, James L., 3, and Isabella J., 4 mos. 

In the 1860 census of Dismal, Sampson County: Faraba Manuel, 60, farmer (widow), and children Gidens, 33, Michael A., 23, Eden, 21, John, 19, William H., 16, Enoch, 14, and Nancy, 12, plus Lemuel Manuel, 60. 

In the 1860 census of Honeycutts, Sampson County: Jesse Jacobs, 43, farmer, wife Abba, 41, and children Edward J., 14, Betsey A., 13, John R., 11, Martha, 8, Solomon, 6, Jesse, 4, and Abba J. Jacobs, 6, plus William, 10, Eliza, 8, and John Jacobs, 6.

Register of (NC-Born) Negroes and Mulattos: Bartholomew County, Indiana, no. 5.

Catharine Hill, age 32, born Perquimans County NC; mulatto woman; 5’3”; small scar over each eye; resided Johnson County IN; witness Joshua A. Horn; registered 20 Mar 1854.

Abraham Augustus Hill, age 2, born Bartholomew County IN; negro boy; “a plump little darkie, and, if nothing happens to prevent will make a big one some day”; resided Johnson County IN; witness Joshua A. Horn; registered 20 Mar 1854.

Andrew Jackson Hill, age 8, born Bartholomew County IN; negro boy; appears sprightly; small scars over left eye and on left cheek; resided Johnson County IN; witness Joshua A. Horn; registered 20 Mar 1854.

Susan Henrietta Hill, age 4, born Bartholomew County IN; negro girl; “a rightly sprightly little girl”; resided Johnson County IN; witness Joshua A. Horn; registered 20 Mar 1854.

Alexander Leevy, age 6, born Robeson County NC; mulatto boy; bright, active and intelligent; no marks; father’s name Louis Leevy; Edward A. Herod; registered 21 Sep 1853.

In the 1860 census of Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana: John Blanks, 60, farmer, Milly Blanks, 75, and Eli Blanks, 21, plus Alexander Levy, 14, all born in NC except Milly, who was born in Maryland.

Priscilla Mitchell, age 45, born Halifax County NC; negro woman; hair slightly gray; widow, no children; witness William H.H. Terrell; registered 10 Nov 1853.

Jemima Newby, age 15; born Jackson County IN; negro girl; 5’5”; witness Joshua V. Horn; registered 20 Mar 1854.

Penina Newby; age 50-60; born Perquimans County NC;  5’3”; witness Joshua V. Horn; registered 20 Mar 1854.

John Newby, age 21; born Jackson County IN; negro’ 5’5”; small scar on right forehead and on knuckle of right little finger; witness Joshua V. Horn; registered 20 Mar 1854.

An act to emancipate Jerry.

An Act to emancipate Jerry, a slave.

Sec. 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That Jerry, a slave, the property of H.B Williams and S.A. Davis, of Mecklenburg county, be, and he is hereby, with the consent and at the request of his said owner, emancipated and set free; and, by the name of Jerry Bethel, shall hereafter possess and exercise all the rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other free persons of color in this State: Provided nevertheless, that before said slave shall be emancipated, the said Williams and Davis, or either of them, shall give bond and good security, to the Governor and his successors in office, in the county court of Mecklenburg county, in the sum of one thousand dollars, that the said Jerry shall honestly and correctly demean himself as long as he shall remain in the State, and shall not become a county charge; which bond may be sued upon in the name of the governor for the time being, to the use of the said county, and of any person injured by the misconduct of said slave hereby emancipated. [Ratified the 8th day of January, 1855.]

Chapter 108, Public and Private Laws of North Carolina Passed by the General Assembly 1854-55, State Library of North Carolina.

In the 1860 census of Western Division, Mecklenburg County: Jerry Bethel, 45, barber, “manumitted,” wife Mary Bethel, 40, and Robison Reid, 8.  Bethel reported $2300 of real property and $1250 of personal property.

Sentenced to the gallows for stealing a slave.

At the late session of the Superior Court of Currituck County, N.C. a free negro man named Moses FULLER was sentenced to the gallows for seducing and stealing in conjunction with several other persons, a certain negro woman slave, contrary to a statute of the state of North Carolina, making the offense death without benefit of clergy.  He is to be executed on the 29th ins.

Baltimore Patriot & Commercial Gazette, 20 November 1822.

Jesse Jacobs.

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JESSE ADAMS JACOBS (1817-1902) was born in Sampson or Cumberland County. His parentage is unclear. Circa 1845, he married Abigail Gilliam, who may have been white. The family lived in the Honeycutts area of Sampson County until the 1880s, when they migrated a few miles north to Dudley, Wayne County. Their children were: James Edward Jacobs, Elizabeth A. Jacobs Maynor, John R. Jacobs, Martha Jacobs, Solomon Jacobs, Jesse Adams Jacobs Jr., Abigail Jane Jacobs Brewington, and Margaret Frances Jacobs Carter.  Jesse is buried in the cemetery of the First Congregational Church in Dudley. “May the resurrection find thee on the bosom of thy God.”

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.