Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Wayne County

Richard Artis.

There had been a photograph of Adam Artis, cousin Daisy told me, but it had been stored with other things in a barn, and rain had ruined it. She recalled an image of a  brown-skinned man, or the suggestion of one anyway in the soft sepia and charcoal portraits of the day.

If no photograph of Adam exists, however, there is one of his youngest brother. His image, in fact, is the only one known of any of Vicey Artis and Solomon Williams’ children.

Image

Richard Artis was born in 1850 in Greene County, very near Wayne. He spent his youth out of sight of censustakers, but in 1873, he married Susanna Yelverton (also known as Susanna Hall, the daughter of free woman of color Nicey [or Caroline] Hall and a white Yelverton.) Their children included: Lucinda Artis Shearod, Emma Artis Reid, Ivory L. Artis, Loumiza Artis Grantham, Richard Artis Jr., Susan Artis Cooper, Jonah Artis, Charity Artis Coley, Frances Artis Newsome, John Henry Artis and Walter Clinton Artis.

Richard Artis farmed in northern Wayne County all his life. He died 12 February 1923 in Great Swamp township of apoplexy and was buried the next day by the son of his sister, Zilpha Artis Wilson.

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Photo courtesy of Teresa C. Artis.

In payment of Confederate taxes, no. 3.

Form of the estimate and assessment of agricultural products agreed upon by the assessor and tax-payer, and the value of the portion thereof to which the government is entitled, which is taxed in kind, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11 of “an Act to lay taxes for the common defence and carry on the government of the Confederate States,” said estimate and assessment to be made as soon as the crops are ready for market.

Mathew Aldridge

Cured Fodder     Quantity of gross crop. — 1000    Tithe or one-tenth. – 100    Value of one-tenth. — $3.00 

I, Mathew Aldridge of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina do swear that the above is a true statement and estimate of all the agricultural products produced by me during the year 1863, which are taxable by the provisions of the 11th section of the above stated act, including what may have been sold of consumed by me, and of the value of that portion of said crops to which the government is entitled.   /s/ Mathew X Aldridge

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the 3 day of December 1863, and I further certify that the above estimate and assessment has been agreed upon by said Mathew Aldridge and myself as a correct and true statement of the amount of his crops and the value of the portion to which the government is entitled.  /s/ J.A. Lane, Assessor.

Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, National Archives and Records Administration.

Wayne County Apprentices, 1844.

Joseph Seaberry, age 2 years 8 months, and Exeline Seaberry, age 4 years 8 months, were bound to Burwell Martin.

Patrick Artis, 4 1/2, was bound to Martin Sauls.

John Artis, 2, was bound to William Aycock.

Thomas Artis, 15, and Rufus Artis, 5, were bound to William Hooks.

Henderson Gandy, 17, was bound to Thos. T. Hollowell.

Jacob Goins, 10, was bound to Washington Hooks.

John Carroll was bound to Robert McKinnie.

John Hagans, 15, was bound to Bunyan Barnes.

Apprentice Records, Wayne County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

In payment of Confederate taxes, no. 2.

Form of the estimate and assessment of agricultural products agreed upon by the assessor and tax-payer, and the value of the portion thereof to which the government is entitled, which is taxed in kind, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11 of “an Act to lay taxes for the common defence and carry on the government of the Confederate States,” said estimate and assessment to be made as soon as the crops are ready for market.

Celia Artis by son

Cured Fodder     Quantity of gross crop. — 2500   Tithe or one-tenth. — 250    Value of one-tenth. — $7.50

I, Celia Artis of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina do swear that the above is a true statement and estimate of all the agricultural products produced by me during the year 1863, which are taxable by the provisions of the 11th section of the above stated act, including what may have been sold of consumed by me, and of the value of that portion of said crops to which the government is entitled.   /s/ Calvin X Artis

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the 29 day of December 1863, and I further certify that the above estimate and assessment has been agreed upon by said Celia Artis and myself as a correct and true statement of the amount of his crops and the value of the portion to which the government is entitled.  /s/ J.A. Lane, Assessor.

Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, National Archives and Record Administration.

In payment of Confederate taxes, no. 1.

Form of the estimate and assessment of agricultural products agreed upon by the assessor and tax-payer, and the value of the portion thereof to which the government is entitled, which is taxed in kind, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11 of “an Act to lay taxes for the common defence and carry on the government of the Confederate States,” said estimate and assessment to be made as soon as the crops are ready for market.

Adam Artis by wife

Cured Fodder     Quantity of gross crop. — 1500     Tithe or one-tenth. — 150     Value of one-tenth. — $4.50

I, Adam Artis of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina do swear that the above is a true statement and estimate of all the agricultural products produced by me during the year 1863, which are taxable by the provisions of the 11th section of the above stated act, including what may have been sold of consumed by me, and of the value of that portion of said crops to which the government is entitled.   /s/ Adam X Artis

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the 3 day of December 1863, and I further certify that the above estimate and assessment has been agreed upon by said Adam Artis and myself as a correct and true statement of the amount of his crops and the value of the portion to which the government is entitled.  /s/ J.A. Lane, Assessor.

The Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865 (NARA M346), often called the “Confederate Citizens File,” is a collection of 650,000 vouchers and other documents relating to goods furnished or services rendered to the Confederate government by private individuals and businesses.

The “Citizens File” was created by the Confederate Archives Division of the Adjutant General’s Office from records created or received by the Confederate War and Treasury Departments that were in the custody of the U.S. War Department. The Citizens File was created to aid in determining the legitimacy of compensation claims submitted for property losses allegedly inflicted by Union forces. The records were used by the Treasury and Justice Departments, Southern Claims Commission, Court of Claims, and congressional claims committees to determine whether the claimant had been loyal to the Union or had aided the Confederate government and thus not eligible for compensation.

[Sidenote: In 1863, Adam Artis was married to Frances Seaberry. They are my great-great-great-grandparents. — LYH]

Wayne County Apprentices, 1843.

Eliza Hagans, 16, was bound to Lovet Peacock in 1843.

William Ayers, 13 was bound to Fred Hollomon in 1843.

In the 1860 census of Black Creek, Wilson County: William Ayres, 30, farm laborer, in the household of Stephen Privett, farmer.

John Q. Barfield, 12, Thomas Barfield, 11, and Henry Barfield, 7, were bound to John Hooks in 1843.

In the 1850 census of North Side of Neuse, Wayne County: Henry Barfield, 14, in the household of Mary Hooks. In the 1860 census of Nahunta, Wayne County: Thomas Barfield, 32 turpentine hand, with Charly A., 16, and Melvina Barfield, 2.

William Ayers, 13, was bound to Enos Rose in 1843.

Ruben Artis, 1, and July Artis, 1, were bound to John Exum in 1843.

In the 1850 census of Warren, Warren County: Reuben Pettiford, 50, stonemason, wife Judy A. Pettiford, 37, children Eliza Artis, 21, Alfred Artis, 15, Jack Artis, 13, Rhody Artis, 12, Ruben Artis Jr., 10, Julian Artis, 9, Mary Artis, 7, Elizabeth J. Pettiford, 5, and Virginia Pettiford, 3, plus Middy Artis, 60, and Isah Artis, 4 months. [Sidenote: This family appears in a number of permutations in the 1850 and 1860 censuses. Apparently, Reuben Pettiford and Judy Pettiford married late, if at all, and did not always cohabitate.  –LYH.]

Simpson Artis, 14, Jordan Artis, 11, Henry Artis, 9, Duncan Artis, 7, Ned Artis, 7, Leonard Artis, 4, Nancy Artis, 2, Rasberry Artis, 1, and Levinah Artis were bound to Burket Barnes in 1843.

In the 1850 census of Monroe, Howard County, Indiana: Simpson Artis, 22, laborer, born NC, and John Owens, 24, born Indiana. In the 1850 census of North Side of Neuse, Wayne County: Henry, 15, Duncan, 13, Lenoard, 10, and Ashberry Artice, 7, in the household of Burkett Barnes, farmer. In the 1860 census of Saulston, Wayne County: Olive Artis, 60, Elizabeth Artis, 20, Jordan, 27, and infant, 1 month. 

Apprentice Records, Wayne County Records, North Carolina State Archives; federal censuses.

Her brother has the deed, unless he destroyed it.

State of North Carolina, To the Sheriff if Wayne County   } Greeting – You are commanded to summon Wm. Burnett to be and appear before the Judge of Probate of Wayne County at the Court House in Goldsboro on Friday the 17th day of September 1875 at 11 A.M. and testify under oath, upon the hearing of a motion now pending in the Probate Court of said County, made by Mary Lynch Ex parte – And also to bring with him the said Wm Burnett and produce at the time and place aforesaid a certain deed or paper writing executed by the late Wm Smith to the late Himerick Lynch, conveying to the said Lynch a lot of land in the town of Goldsboro, at the Southwestern corner of West Centre and Elm Streets – or conveying to him an interest [illegible] – And that he also bring and produce as aforesaid any paper in his possession relating to said land or the title of the said Lynch thereto. Herein fail not under the penalty prescribed by law.

Witness W.T. Yelverton Judge of Probate for Wayne County the 16th day of September 1845. /s/ W.T. Yelverton Probate Judge

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North Carolina, Wayne County   }

Mary Lynch Ex parte } In the Probate Court

Mary Lynch swears that she is the widow of Himerick Lynch deceased, who died during the year 1865 seized of a lot of land in Goldsboro on the Southwestern Corner of West Center and Elm Streets which had been conveyed to him by Wm. Smith now decesed – that before the death of the said Himerick he had left said deed in the hands of Wm Burnett, who now has the same in possession if it has not been destroyed. Affiant further swears that she has never had dower, or homestead assigned to her out of said land or any other land of the said Himerick Lynch and that she is advised that she is entitled thereto, and has an interest in said land, and that said deed has never been proven and Registered.  Mary X Lynch

Sworn to before me Sept 16th 1875 W.T. Yelverton

Estate Records, Wayne County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

In the 1850 census of North Side of Neuse, Wayne County: Himerick Lench, 32, painter, wife Mary, 32, and Susan Burnet, 10.

Each shall have possession during his or her lifetime.

Be it remembered that I Zion Reid of Wayne County in the State of N.C. being of sound mind and memory, but being well aware of the uncertainty of this life, do hereby make this my last Will and testament

After the payment of my just debts and funeral expenses I bequeath and devise as follows. My wife Lucy Reid should she be the longest lived shall have full control of my property during her life and then all my land shall be equally divided among my children or their lawful heirs: provided that Billie and Zion Jr. shall each have eight acres of Land lying around the home and then an equal division with the other of the remainder. Of my other property in whatever it may consist Billie and Zion Jr. shall each have $150.00 Julius $100 and Bryant Smith $50.00 and James $10.00 after this each one of my children except Julius shall share equally in the remaining that I further devise that no one of the children have power to sell or in any way encumber any prt or parcel of said land. That each shall have possession during his or her life then the same shall be held only by his or her lawfull heirs during their life &c. James shall only be subject to hold that part allotted if his family be agreeable to the other children and neighbors. I further direct that my son Isaac and E.E. Smith shall be administrators of the estate.    /s/ Zion Reid

Signed in the presence of us who at his request and in his presence do hereby subscribe our names as witnesses thereto  Witness J.F. Dobson, J.A. Washington.

[Proved 3 December 1890.] Will Book 1, page 539. Office of Clerk of Superior Court, Wayne County Courthouse, Goldsboro.

Runaway bound girl may try to pass.

NOTICE.

ALL persons are forbid harboring my bound girl SUSAN, as the law will be enforced against all such. Susan ran away on Saturday evening last, the 10th inst; she is a bright mulatto, about 13 years old, and may try to pass for white. I expect she is making towards Raleigh.  WM. McLEOD.

Goldsboro’, Sept. 14, 1853.

New Era, Goldsboro, 27 October 1853.

Circuit preacher.

Church Directory “Fremont Items” —

Rev. Jonah Williams of Wilson filled his regular appointment at Turners Swamp last Sunday.

The Blade, Wilson, 20 Nov 1897.

[Turner Swamp Primitive Baptist Church still meets in a small church north of Eureka, Wayne County. Descendants of several of Jonah Williams’ siblings are buried there. — LYH]