Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Sampson County

Better late ….

MANY TAR HEEL WAR CLAIMS IN BILL

The Items were Contained in the Measure Reported to the Senate Yesterday.

FULL LIST OF CLAIMS.

By Parker R. Anderson.

Washington, March 20. – The following North Carolina items were carried in the civil war claims bill which was reported to the senate: …Hardy A. Brewington, administrator of the estate of Raiford Brewington, deceased, late of Sampson County, $530 …

Greensboro Daily News, 21 March 1914.

Carter, Revolutionary War soldier.

State of North Carolina, Sampson County   } Superior Court of Law Fall Term 1820

On this 25th day of October 1820 Personally appeared in Open Court being a Court of Record held in & for the County of Sampson, Moses Carter (a Man of Colour) aged Sixty Nine years who being first duly Sworn, according to Law, doth on his Oath, make the following declaratory in order to obtain the Provisions made by the Acts of Congress of the 18th March 1818 and the 1st of May 1820, that he the said Moses Carter enlisted for the Term of eighteen months on the 19th of July 1782, that he served in Captain Joseph T. Rhodes Company in the first Regiment of the North Carolina line in the Continental Establishment in the time of the Revolutionary War from the first of August 1782 until the first of July 1783 at which time he was discharged, and in Pursuance of the Act of the 1st of May 1820, I do solemly swear that I was a Resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th of March 1818 and that I have not since that time, by gift, sale of in any manner disposed of my Property or any part thereof, with intent thereby to diminish it as to bring myself within the provisions of an Act of Congress Entitled “An Act to provide for Certain Persons engaged in the Land and Naval Service of the United States in the Revolutionary War,” passed on the 18th day of March 1818; that I have not nor has any Person in trust for me, any property or Securities Contracts or debts due to me, not have I any income other than what is contained in the Schedule hereunto annexed & by me Subscribed; that he has no other evidence now in his Power of his Services except what is hereunto annexed.  Moses X Carter

A Schedule of Property held by Moses Carter

3 – 2 year old hogs                                            $9.00

3 breeding sows                                                 9.00

19 year old Hoggs                                              28.50

5 Piggs                                                               2.50

2 old Pots                                                             2.00

1 skillet                                                                 40

1 old Dutch oven                                                  50

2 old Pails tubs & one Pail                                   1

5 old axes 3 hoes & 2 grubing hoes                     4

56.94            Moses X Carter

———-

I hereby Certify that Mosses Carter is inlisted in the Continental Army for eighteen Months and has leave of absence until the first of August Next then to Join the Reg’t at Duplin Courthouse and is not to be molested by any person whatsoever   Ja’s Kenan Col    July 19th 1782

Moses Tyler testified to Carter’s service and noted that he “is old & has lost his Speech & is very feeble, is a farmer.”

From the file of Moses Carter, Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration.

Self-evident facts.

SKETCH OF THE JONES FAMILY

John R. Jones is the son of Martha Jones, and his father was a white man. Martha Jones’ mother was one Polly Jones, a pure white woman, and her father was an Indian. She was one-half white, one-half Indian. John R. Jones, therefore, was three-fourths white, one-fourth Indian. He married Macy A. Brewington, the daughter of Hardy Brewington. They have a large family of boys and girls in their home, white predominating, seemingly in himself and his entire family. Martha Jones is now living and says the above statements are true. Also, judging from her features and general characteristics, it is a self-evident fact that she is of Indian and white extraction. The said Martha Jones also has another son and several daughters, who are undoubtedly of pure white and Indian blood.

From George E. Butler, “The Croatan Indians of Sampson County, North Carolina. Their Origin and Racial Status. A Plea for Separate Schools,” (1916).

Timothy Goodman and family.

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JONATHAN GOODMAN

The subject of this sketch is now 76 years old and resides in Honeycutts Township, Sampson County. His wife, now dead, was Dorcas Maynor. Their children and grandchildren attend the Indian school in Herrings Township. Jonathan Goodman’s father was Timothy Goodman and his mother was Nancy Maynor. The records in the Register of Deeds’ office of Sampson County show that Timothy Goodman was a large land owner before the Civil War, and after his death his widow, Nancy Goodman, was assigned dower in this land in Sampson County, according to these records. She was a typical Croatan Indian and showed no traces of negro blood. Jonathan’s grandmother was Nancy Revell, and the Revell family are now prominent Croatans in Robeson County.

SKETCH OF THE GOODMAN FAMILY

Timothy Goodman is the founder of this particular family in Sampson County. He is said to have represented in features and general appearance the Indian race, he having straight black hair, and his complexion being of reddish hue. His mother was one Sallie Hobbs. His father unknown. He married Nancy Maynor, a woman who was an excellent specimen of the Cherokee Indian race. Jonathan Goodman is the son of the above Timothy Goodman, and we are sure, judging from his general appearance, that he is at least three-fourths Indian, with only one-fourth white. His first wife was one Dorcas Maynor, Indian, daughter of Morris Maynor. Many sons and daughters were born to this couple, after which the first wife died, and he married his present wife, Lucy Faircloth, who was the daughter of a white woman by the name of Mary Faircloth. Her father being unknown to the writer. Mary E. Brewington is the daughter of Lucy Goodman, her father being an Indian. Mary E. Brewington married James Brewington, a son of Raford Brewington. They also have several sons and daughters.

From George E. Butler, “The Croatan Indians of Sampson County, North Carolina. Their Origin and Racial Status. A Plea for Separate Schools,” (1916).

Five times no.

SOLDIER’S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF SAMPSON  }                 

On this 24 day of July, A.D. 1912, personally appeared before me W.F. Sessoms, C.S.C. in and for the State and County aforesaid, Enos Jacobs, age 67 years, and a resident at Clinton post-office, in said County and State, and who, being duly sworn, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the pension under the provisions of an act entitled “An act for the relief of certain Confederate Soldiers, Sailors and Widows,” ratified March 8, 1907; that he is the identical Enos Jacobs who enlisted in Co. F, 2nd Reg., N.C. State Troops Bat, on or about the [blank] day of [blank], 1863, to serve in the armies of the late Confederate States, and that while in service at [blank] in the State of [blank], on or about [blank] day of April, 1863, he received a wound or wounds, etc. [description] I was a colored work hand at Fort Caswell and Cameron during the war. I threw up breast works rolled sand and dug up turf to put over the sand to keep it from blowing away. I remained in the war until the close. I am old and need help. I can’t get about to do anything scarcely.

He further states: that he is, and has been for twelve months immediately preceding this Application for Pension, a bona fide resident of North Carolina; that he holds no office under the United States, or any State or County, from which he is receiving the sum of three hundred dollars as fees or as salary annually; that he is not worth in his own right, or the right of his wife, property at its assessed value for taxation to the amount of five hundred dollars ($500), or has he disposed of property of such value by gift or voluntary conveyance since the 11th of March, 1885; and that he is not receiving any aid from the State of North Carolina or under any other statue providing for the relief of the maimed and blind soldiers of the State.   Enos X Jacobs

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 24 day of July, 1912.  /s/ W.F. Sessoms

Also personally appeared before me B.S. Peterson, who resides at Clinton post-office, in said County and State, a person whom I know to be respectable and entitled to credit, and being by me duly sworn, says he acquainted with Enos Jacobs, the applicant for pension, and has every reason to believe that he is the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the facts set forth in this affidavit are correct to the best of his knowledge and belief, and that he has no interest, direct or indirect, in this claim. /s/ B.S. Peterson

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 24 day of July, 1912.  /s/ W.F. Sessoms

Also personally appeared before me Dr. John A. Stevens a physician in good standing in said County and State and being duly sworn, says that he has carefully and thoroughly examined Enos Jacobs, the applicant for pension, and finds such disability for manual labor as described below, by reason of wounds received while in the discharge of his duty as a soldier or sailor of North Carolina in the service of the late Confederate States. I find it is with great difficulty that he can walk at all. He is a great sufferer with chronic rheumatism. He looks to be much older than herein stated, and shows that he has been a great sufferer from pain. There is a spinal trouble also. The right leg is shrunken & partly paralyzed.   /s/ John A. Stevens, Signature of Physician.

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 25 day of July, 1912.  /s/ W.F. Sessoms

—–

Enos Jacobs’ application was disallowed: “Negro Worked on Breastworks.” He applied again on 18 July 1913, stating “I was in the war from 1862 till 1865 the cease of the war. I was a cook Jim Strange of Fayetteville was my capt. I am now old and cant do much work.” A different doctor testified to his rheumatism and a marked “aortic systolic” problem, but noted that he had not been injured in the war. Application disallowed: “Was a Cook.” He applied a third time on 1 July 1918: “Applicant was not wounded, but during this service he caught a cough from which he has never recovered. I was cook for Mr. Walter Draughon and Mr. Buck Peterson.” His doctor noted that he had chronic bronchitis, cataracts in both eyes, and marked arteriosclerosis. Disallowed. He applied a fourth time on 19 June 1915: “I was not wounded in service but I am now old and cant do but very little work. I have Rheumatism badly at time and am blind in one eye. My work in the war was cooking for and waiting on soldiers. I was in service about two years.” Jacobs returned to Dr. Stevens, who itemized his disabilities and added “He is certainly deserving of assistance.” Disallowed. Jacobs applied for the fifth and final time on 11 July 1916: “I was not wounded in the war. I helped throw up breastworks, cut turf and rolled sand, and was sent to the salt works at top sail sound and assisted in making salt for the government. I waited on the white folks generally in the war and cooked some. I am now old and cant do but very little work.” Hardy A. Brewington vouched for his identity, and Dr. Stevens again pled his infirmities. Disallowed: “Not in Army but at Salt Works.”

File of Enos Jacobs, North Carolina Confederate Soldiers and Widows Pension Applications 1885-1953, http://FamilySearch.org. Original, North Carolina State Archives.

Marshall A. Carter.

ImageMARSHALL ARCHIE CARTER (or, perhaps, Archie or Archibald Marshall Carter, though his initials are shown as “M.C.” above) was born in 1860 to William Carter (1833-ca1875) and Mary Cox Carter (ca1830-??) of Sampson County. His father William was the son of Michael Carter (1805-ca1875) and his wife Patience.  Marshall Carter married Margaret Frances Jacobs.  They are buried in the First Congregational Church, Dudley, Wayne County.

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

In the 1860 census of Clinton, Sampson County: Wm. Carter, 26, farmer; wife Mary, 34; and children Cornelia, 12, Francenia, 6, Thos. G., 5, Sarah J., 2, and Archibald, 7 months.  Next door: Michael Carter, 57, and wife Patience, 47. All mulatto. [A duplicate listing in Piney Grove, Sampson County: William Carter, 27, turpentine laborer; wife Mary, 27; and children Cornelia, 12, Francenia, 6, Isaaih T., 4, Sarah J., 2, and Archy M., 6 months.]

This death certificate was filed in Wayne County: Marshall Carter. Died 11 July 1922, Dudley, Brogden, Wayne County. Colored. Farmer. Married to Frances Carter. Born 7 July 1860, Duplin County, to William Carter and Mary [last name unknown.] Buried in Dudley. Informant, Milford Carter, Mount Olive NC.

Julia Boone Budd.

ImageJULIA BOONE BUDD was born in 1854 in Sampson County to William and Susan Boone. She married Wesley M. Budd on 24 July 1873 in Wayne County.  They are buried in the Budd cemetery near Dudley, Wayne County.

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, March 2013.

In the 1860 census of McDaniels, Sampson County: Wm. Boon, 33, farm laborer; wife Susan, 31; Hezekiah, 6; Julia, 5; Azariah, 3; and Benamma Boon, 1.

The largest of any Indian family.

The Brewington family is now the largest of any Indian family in Sampson County, most of which are the children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and even the great-great-grandchildren of the late Raford Brewington, father of Hardy A. Brewington. He had several other sons and daughters. Brewington is a pure English word, which means a brewer of drinks, and we would also add, one that likes such drinks after they have been made, which is one of the characteristics that followed this family for several generations, and even now the evil practice is overcome only by the very best of training. This name was first given to an Indian who was considered by the white settlers of what is now Sampson County, as an excellent maker of “fire water,” as the Indians called it. They called him Bill Brewington. His Indian name was dropped, and he was taught the language of the English.

Bill Brewington’s wife was a Cherokee Indian, by the name of Jane Brewington, who lived a good many years after her husband’s death. They had a daughter, Hannah Brewington, who if now living would be upwards of one hundred and forty years old. Hannah Brewington is well remembered by few of the oldest people of the county, namely John Emanuel, Jonathan Goodman, James Strickland, and others. They describe her as being a true specimen of the original Cherokee, she being of a copper-reddish hue, with prominent cheek-bones, straight black hair and black eyes. She bought land in the year of 1807, as the records in Clinton, N. C., now show, though before that time she and her people lived on the banks of Coharee, without any need of buying, as the land was held in common by the Indians of those days.

The above Hannah Brewington was the mother of Raford Brewington, who has already been mentioned in this section. She helped a poor illiterate bound white boy, who was, as we have been told, a son of a soldier who was killed during the Revolutionary War, while bearing arms for the independence of America. Soon after the death of his father his mother also died, leaving the child to provide for himself. His name was Simon, and as he was placed under the control of a man that owned a good many servants and slaves, he was given the title that has ever been known as his name, “White Simon.” Hannah Brewington proved to be a friend to this poor orphan boy, and in time, by early Indian custom, she and he were married. Soon after the marriage of this couple, Raford, a son, was born in their home. Simon having no real surname, adopted the name of his wife. Soon after the birth of the above Raford Brewington, his father left the State and went north. He has never returned, but was heard from a few times indirectly. Thus you see the beginning of the Brewington family of Sampson County.

One other son and daughter were born to Hannah Brewington, namely, Nathan Brewington and Nancy Brewington.

From George E. Butler, “The Croatan Indians of Sampson County, North Carolina. Their Origin and Racial Status. A Plea for Separate Schools,” (1916).

[Sidenote: Though I have offered excerpts from Butler’s appeal without comment, here I think it prudent to advise that it, like all of the early written history reproduced here, should be considered carefully in the context of the time and place — and purpose — for which it was written. — LYH]

He has proven it.

William A. Maynor, who was born in Sampson County, is a descendant of Stephen Maynor, who was a soldier of the Revolutionary War, as the records in Washington, D. C., now show. He was also a descendant on mother’s side of the late Nicholas Emanuel. He has satisfactorily proven before the courts of North Carolina and Cumberland County that his wife was at least two-thirds Indian. He has a certificate properly signed by the officials of Cumberland County, certifying these facts.

The Maynors are said to be descendants of Manteo, the friendly Indian chief of historical times. (See McMillan’s History of the Indians of Robeson County.)

From George E. Butler, “The Croatan Indians of Sampson County, North Carolina. Their Origin and Racial Status. A Plea for Separate Schools,” (1916).

Seemingly white predominating their features.

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William J. Bledsole, one of the most prominent Indians of Sampson County, was evidently a white man with only a small degree of Indian blood. His wife was Nancy Emanuel, the This couple reside in Dismal Township, Sampson County. The father of William was a Croatan and his mother was Mary Bledsole, a white woman. Nancy, his wife, was Nancy Manuel, a sister of Enoch Manuel, and youngest daughter of Michael Manuel. The Manuels were large land owners in Sampson County prior and since the Revolutionary War. There is no record in their family history or family tradition for over 150 years showing any mixture of negro blood. This couple have seven children: Docia, wife of Enoch Manuel. Jr.; Rutha, wife of Ollin Brewington; Molsy, wife of Matthew Burnette; Isabella, wife of Erias Brewington; Lou Berta, wife of Jonah Manuel; W. L. Bledsole, who married Amandy Warrick; James Henry Bledsole, who married Hannah Warrick. Amandy and Hannah were daughters of William J. Warrick and wife Betsie Manuel Warrick, prominent Croatans of Robeson County. The Bledsole family are good specimens of white and Indian blood.  His oldest son, Luther Bledsole, married Amandy Warrick, a woman of white and Indian blood. Her father was William J. Warrick and her mother, Betsie Emanuel. James Henry Bledsole, his youngest son, married Hannah Warrick, the daughter of the above named William J. Warrick.

The Bledsole families are fine specimens of pure white and Indian, seemingly white predominating their features.

From George E. Butler, “The Croatan Indians of Sampson County, North Carolina. Their Origin and Racial Status. A Plea for Separate Schools,” (1916).

In the 1860 census of Westbrooks, Sampson County: Robin Bedsole, 80, Polly Bedsole, 35, Eliza Bedsole, 16, and William Bedsole, 12. William is described as mulatto; the others, white.

In the 1850 census of Northern District, Sampson County: Michael Manuel, 63, cooper; wife Fereby, 49; and children Gideon, 19, Cintilla, 16, Drusilla, 15,Michael, 13, Eden, 11, John, 9, William, 7, Enoch, 4, and Nancy, 1; all described as mulatto.