Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: grandfather clause

Voter Registration under the Grandfather Clause: Sampson County.

Public Laws of North Carolina, 1899, chapter 218.

(Sec. 4.) Every person presenting himself for registration shall be able to read and write any section of the constitution in the English language and before he shall be entitled to vote he shall have paid on or before the first day of March of the year in which he proposes to vote his poll tax as prescribed by law for the previous year. Poll taxes shall be a lien only on assessed property and no process shall issue to enforce the collection of the same except against assessed property.

(Sec. 5.) No male person who was on January one, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, or at any time prior thereto entitled to vote under the laws of any states in the United States wherein he then resided, and no lineal descendant of any such person, shall be denied the right to register and vote at any election in this state by reason of his failure to possess the educational qualification prescribed in section four of this article….

The following colored men registered to vote in Sampson County in 1902-06.  In accordance with Section 5, each was required to name the ancestor who “grandfathered” him in:

C.H. Brewington, 63, Dismal township, Johnson Brewington.

In 1850 Northern District, Sampson, Johnson Brewington, 45, house carpenter;  wife Nancy, 23; and children Charles, 6, John, 4, Johnson, 2, and James, 2 months; all mulatto.  In 1860, Northern Division: Johnson Bruington, 50, cooper; wife Nancy, 45; and children Young, 12, Charles, 13, Johnson, 12, Andrew, 9, Mary, 8, Elizabeth, 7, William, 6, Alexandria, 5, Matilda, 3, and Adolphus, 1; all mulatto.

Matthew Burnett, 24, Dismal, Matthew Burnett.

In the 1850 census of Fayetteville, Cumberland County: Arch’d Burnet, 55, laborer, wife Lucinda, 39, and children Matthew, 9, Alex’d, 6, Susan, 2, and Henrietta, 14; all mulatto.

Enoch Manuel, Dismal, Michel Manuel.

Jonah Manuel, Dismal, Michel Manuel.

Enoch Manuel Jr., Dismal, Michel Manuel.

In the 1850 census of Northern District, Sampson County: Michael Manuel, 63, cooper; wife Fereby, 49; and children Gideon, 19, Cintilla, 16, Drusilla, 15, Michael, 13, Eden, 11, John, 9, William, 7, Enoch, 4, and Nancy, 1; all described as mulatto.

Hardy Brewington, 56, Herrings, himself.

Matthew L. Brewington, 30, Herrings, Hardy Brewington.

John A. Brewington, 25, Honeycutts, Hardy A. Brewington.

C.D. Brewington, 21, Herrings, Raiford Brewington.

George B. Brewington, 22, Herrings, Raiford Brewington.

James A. Brewington, 37, Honeycutts, unnamed.

In the 1850 census of Northern District, Sampson County: Raiford Brewington, 38, cooper; wife Barsheba, 33; and children Nancy, 13, Thomas, 10, Lucy, 9, Ann, 7, James, 5, Hardy, 3, Joshua, 2, and Raiford, 2 months; plus Hardy Manuel, 17; all mulatto.

Lofton Goodman, 71, Herrings, himself.

James Goodman, 24, Herrings, Lofton Goodman.

John R. Goodman, 36, Herrings, Lofton Goodman.

Rubin Goodman, 56, Herrings, Timothy Goodman.

Jonathan Goodman, 64, Honeycutts, Timothy Goodman.

In the 1850 census of the Northern District of Sampson County: Timothy Goodman, 43, “turpentine”; wife Nancy, 37; and children John, 17, laborer, Lofton, 16, laborer, Jonathan, 10, Anna, 9, Reuben, 6, Timothy, 3, Matilda, 6 months; all mulatto.

Henry Hardin, 53, Herrings, Amos Hardin.

In the 1850 census of the Northern District of Sampson County: Amos Hardin, 36, cooper; wife Cassey, 33; and children John, 10, Abel, 6, Mary, 5, Martha, 4, and Frances, 2; all mulatto. In 1860, Honeycutts, Sampson: Amos Hardin, 47, wheelright; wife Cassia, 40; and children John, 22, day laborer, Abel, 17, day laborer, Mary, 12, Patsey, 10, Francis, 8, Henry, 7, and Sarah, 5; all mulatto.

Owen H. Jacob, 58, Herrings, John Jacob.

Jno. R. Jacobs, 23, Herrings, Owen H. Jacobs.

William A. Jacobs, 21, Herrings, Ewens Jacobs.

Alvin Jacob, 23, Herrings, Tull Jacob.

Jno. Robert Jacobs, 23, Herrings, John Tull Jacobs.

Albert Jacobs, 29, Herrings, Tull Jacobs.

Robert H. Jacob, 51, Herrings, Robert Jacob.

In the 1850 census of New Hanover County: Betsey Jacobs, 47, and Tull, 12, Rachell, 10, and Owen H. Jacobs, 7; all mulatto.

Enous Jacob, 57, Herrings, himself.

Enos Jacobs. Died 5 October 1925, Honeycutts, Sampson County. Indian. Married to Miltildia Jacobs. Age about 83. Farmer. Born Sampson County to Archie Jacobs of Pender County and Tempie Manuel. Buried New Bethel cemetery. Informant, C.O. Jacobs.

Charley G. Jacob, 21, Herrings, Enous Jacob.

The. O. Jacob, 34, Herrings, Enous Jacob.

D.O. Jacob, 28, Herrings, Enous Jacob.

Henry Jacobs, 28, Herrings, Archie Jacobs.

Jessie A.B. Jacobs, 54, Herrings, Archie Jacobs.

In the 1860 census of Dismal, Sampson County: Archibal Jacobs, 40, cooper; wife Temperance J., 32; and children Enos, 13, Mary J., 11, Jesse, 6, Cathrine, 4, and Sarah C., 8 months; all mulatto.

John R. Jones, 35, Herrings, Jim Winn.

Thomas Jones, 27, Herrings, Jim Winn.

In the 1850 census of the Northern District of Sampson County: James Winn, 33, farmer, Buckner L. Bryan, 14, Zachariah Bryan, 13, and Owen Armwood, 24, laborer; all mulatto.

Jas. S. Strickland, 67, Herrings, himself.

In the 1860 census of Honeycutts, Sampson County: Raiford Brewington, 48; wife Basheba, 45; and children Thomas, 21, Ann E., 17, James, 15, Hardy, 13, Joshua, 11, Raiford, 9, Simon P., 8, Polla A., 6, Allen B., 4, and Nathan Brewington, 1; with James S. Stricklands, 21, and Lucy A. Stricklands, 20; all mulatto.

Elections Records, Sampson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

Voter Registration Under the Grandfather Clause: Wayne County

Public Laws of North Carolina, 1899, chapter 218.

(Sec. 4.) Every person presenting himself for registration shall be able to read and write any section of the constitution in the English language and before he shall be entitled to vote he shall have paid on or before the first day of March of the year in which he proposes to vote his poll tax as prescribed by law for the previous year. Poll taxes shall be a lien only on assessed property and no process shall issue to enforce the collection of the same except against assessed property.

(Sec. 5.) No male person who was on January one, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, or at any time prior thereto entitled to vote under the laws of any states in the United States wherein he then resided, and no lineal descendant of any such person, shall be denied the right to register and vote at any election in this state by reason of his failure to possess the educational qualification prescribed in section four of this article….

The following colored men registered to vote in Wayne County in 1902.  In accordance with Section 5, each was required to name the ancestor who “grandfathered” him in.

Joseph Aldridge, 36, Brogden, Robert Aldridge.

M.W. Aldridge, 45, Goldsboro, Robert Aldridge.

Robert Aldridge, 33, Brogden, Robert Aldridge.

In the 1860 census of Newton Grove, Sampson County: Robert Aldridge, farmer, $260, illiterate, with wife Mary E., and children George W., John J., Armelia, Matthew L., David S., and a one month-old infant.

A.B. Artis, 29, Nahunta, Absalom Artis.

Joseph Artis, 21, Nahunta, Absalom Artis.

Mack Artis, 52, Nahunta, Absalom Artis.

Nathan Artis, 42, Saulston, Absalom Artis.

In the 1860 census of North Side of the Neuse, Wayne County: Absolom Artis, 70, wife Clarkey, 55, and Absalum, 23, Joseph, 19, Jane, 17, Eveline, 14, and Albert, 12.

Albert Artis, 58, Nahunta, Edwin Artis.

Donnie Artis, 21, Nahunta, Edwin Artis.

In the 1860 census of Buck Swamp, Wayne County: Edwin Artis, 50, Emily, 35, Albert, 16, Elvira, 14,  Absalom, 12, Clarkey, 10, George, 8, William Edwin, 6, and Baby, 9 months.

J.F. Artis, 58, Buck Swamp, James Artis.

John Artis, 39, Buck Swamp, William Hagans.

Oscar Artis, 22, Buck Swamp, Jim Pig.

Will Artis, 47, Buck Swamp, Jim Pig.

In the 1880 census of Pikeville, Wayne County: Willey Artis, 24, wife Charlotte, 24, and son Oschar L., 2 months.

G.W. Barnes, 33, Pikeville, Asey Artis.

In the 1860 census of Wayne County: Asa Artis, 35, wife Phereby, 34, and Lumizer, 20, Mary, 18, Penninah, 15, Lewis, 12, William G., 7, Zilpha J., 3, and Benaja, 1.

Calvin Brock, 52, Brogden, Fred Gibson.

Calvin V. Brock, 24, Brogden, Fred Gibson.

In the 1860 census of the Northern Division of Duplin County: Cassy Smith, 45, with Charlott, 25, Dorcas, 19, Rebecca, 16, Richard, 14, Mary G., 12, Ezekiel, 8, and Thear Smith, 4; plus Calvin Brock, 10, and Samuel Purvie, 35.

Calvin V. Brock was Calvin Brock’s son.

Marshall Carter, 42, Brogden, Mike Carter.

Williby Carter, 22, Brogden, Mike Carter.

In the 1860 census of Clinton, Sampson County: Michael Carter, 57, and wife Patience, 47. Next door, Wm. Carter, 26, wife Mary, 34, and children Cornelia, 6, Francenia, 6, Thos. G., 5, Sarah J., 2, and Archibald, 9 months.  In a duplicate listing in Piney Grove, Sampson County: William Carter, 27, turpentine laborer, Mary 27, Cornelia, 12, Francenia, 6, Isaiah T., 4, Sarah J., 2, and Archy M., 6 months. (Archibald “Archy” M. Carter was Marshall Carter.)

Williby Carter was Marshall Carter’s son.

George Hagans, 48, Nahunta, William Hagans.

H.E. Hagans, 34, Goldsboro, Napoleon Hagans.

W.S. Hagans, 31, Nahunta, Dr. Ward.

Napoleon Hagans, age 6, was apprenticed in 1845 to William Thompson in Wayne County NC.  Apprenticeship Records, Records of Wayne County, North Carolina State Archives.

In the 1850 census of North of the Neuse, Wayne County: Aaron Seaberry, 32, farmhand, wife Louisa, [stepson] Napoleon [Hagans], 10, Frances, 5, and Celia Seaberry, 17. In a duplicate listing, Leacy Hagans with  [grandson] Napoleon Hagans. 

Henry E. and William S. Hagans were Napoleon Hagans’ sons.  (Dr. Ward was David G.W. Ward, father of Henry and William’s mother Apsaline “Appie” Ward Hagans.)

R.H. Hagans, 22, Nahunta, Everett Hagans.

Edwin Hall, 53 Nahunta, Dempsey Hall.

In the 1860 census of Wayne County, North Side of the Neuse: Dempsey Hall, 26, wife Martha, 26, and children Vina, 2, Edwin, 1, and Eveline, 2 months.

John H. Jacob, 52, Brogden, Jesse Jacob.

In the 1860 census of Honeycutts, Sampson County: Jesse Jacobs, 43, wife Abba, 31, and children Edward J. 14, Betsey A., 13, John R., 11, Martha, 8, Solomon, 6, Jesse, 4, and Abba J., 6, plus William, 10, Eliza, 8, and John Jacobs, 6.

George Linch, 22, Buck Swamp, Haywood Linch.

Haywood Linch, 56, Buck Swamp, self.

Morrow J. Linch, 26, Buck Swamp, Haywood Linch.

In the 1850 census of Wayne County, North Side of the Neuse: Raiford Linch, 38, wife Rebeca, 38, and children Bryant, 17, Eveline, 15, Bud, 13, Sarah, 11, Eliza, 10, Haywood, 8, Aley, 5, and John, 2.

Morrow (Marion?) and George Haywood Lynch were Haywood Lynch’s sons.

Wiley Mozingo, 76, Goldsboro, Christopher Mozingo.

In the 1850 census of Northern District, Sampson County: C. Mazingo, 50, mulatto, with Wiley, 18, Joshua, 16, and William, 14.

David Reed, 87, Fork, self.

In the 1860 census of Nahunta, Wayne County: Rhody Reid, 50, son Isaac, 26, and husband David Reid, 65. 

George W. Reid, 32, Goldsboro, Washington Reid.

In the 1850 census of Wayne County, North Side of the Neuse: Washington Read, farmhand, 28, wife Penninah, 25, and Lewiser, 2 months.

Grandfathered in.

The following Wayne County free men of color registered to vote, naming Absalom Artis, as their qualifying ancestor under the Grandfather Clause: A.B. Artis, age 29; Mack Artis, age 52; Joseph Artis, age 21; Nathan Artis, age 42; and Donnie Artis, age 21.  Albert Artis, age 58, named Absalom’s son Edwin Artis.  All the voters lived in Nahunta township except Nathan, who lived in Saulston.

With an express design to disenfranchise black voters, in 1900, North Carolina passed a constitutional amendment requiring that voters be able to read and write a section of the state constitution and pay a poll tax.  To avoid disenfranchising illiterate whites, the amendment contained a “grandfather clause,” which exempted a registrant from the literary requirement if he or a lineal ancestor was eligible vote on 1 Jan 1867.  A number of free men of color were thus able to thwart the law’s intent.