Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Civil War

Gibson applies for Confederate pension.

SOLDIER’S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF BUNCOMBE  }                 

On this 25 day of July, A.D. 1903, personally appeared before me J.B. Cain Deputy, C.S.C. in and for the State and County aforesaid, Stephen Gibson, age [blank] years, and a resident at Asheville post-office, in said County and State, and who, being duly sworn, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the pension under the provisions of an act entitled “An act for the relief of certain Confederate Soldiers, Sailors and Widows,” ratified March 8, 1907; that he is the identical Stephen Gibson who enlisted in Co. F, 29 Reg., N.C. State Troops, on or about [blank] day of August, 1861, to serve in the armies of the late Confederate States, and that while in service at Nickasville in the State of Ky., on or about [blank] day of Sept., 1862, he received a wound or wounds, etc. [description] [General Disability and parolled at Nickasville Ky and that I am not able to perform manual Labor more than one forth of my time. Was honorably discharged Lenoirs, Tenn.].

He further states: That he is, and has been for twelve months immediately preceding this Application for Pension, a bona fide resident of North Carolina; that he holds no office under the United States, or any State or County, from which he is receiving the sum of three hundred dollars as fees or as salary annually; that he is not worth in his own right, or the right of his wife, property at its assessed value for taxation to the amount of five hundred dollars ($500), or has he disposed of property of such value by gift or voluntary conveyance since the 11th of March, 1885; and that he is not receiving any aid from the State of North Carolina or under any other statue providing for the relief of the maimed and blind soldiers of the State.   Stephen X Gibson

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 25 day of July, 1903.  /s/ J.B. Cain, D.C.

Also personally appeared before me B.F. Patton, who resides at Asheville N.C. post-office, in said County and State, a person whom I know to be respectable and entitled to credit, and being by me duly sworn, says he acquainted with Steven Gibson, the applicant for pension, and has every reason to believe that he is the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the facts set forth in this affidavit are correct to the best of his knowledge and belief, and that he has no interest, direct or indirect, in this claim. /s/ B.F. Patton

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this [blank] day of July 25, 1903.  /s/ Jesse R. Starnes, Notary Public

Also personally appeared before me [blank] a physician in good standing in said County and State and being duly sworn, says that he has carefully and thoroughly examined Steven Gibson, the applicant for pension, and finds such disability for manual labor as described below, by reason of wounds received while in the discharge of his duty as a soldier or sailor of North Carolina in the service of the late Confederate States. Is physically incapacitated for any and all manual labor and has been for more than [illegible] years by reason of general weakness result of chronic nephritis (Bright Disease)T[illegible] & [illegible] Swolen G[illegible]   /s/ James S. Burroughs, Signature of Physician.

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 25 day of July, 1903.  /s/ Jesse R. Starnes, Notary Public

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“This application is that of an old colored man – he was free at the beginning of the war and enlisted in Capt. Enloes company (F.) 29th N.C. Troops and served with his command until Braggs campaign in Kentucky in 1864.

Capt Enloe says he was a faithful, good soldier and he would like to see him have a pension. He is a very feeble old man now and not likely to live more than a year, two at most. From what Capt Enloe writes, and our knowledge of the old fellow we recommend a favorable consideration of his care.”

[Stephen Gibson’s application was disallowed. In August 1904, his 71 year-old widow, Loucretia Gibson of Oconolata, Swain County, reapplied. The County Pension Board approved her request for pension.]

From the file of Stephen Gibson, North Carolina Confederate Soldiers and Widows Pension Applications 1885-1953, http://FamilySearch.org. Original, North Carolina State Archives.

The generosity of a free colored woman.

WILKESBORO’, N.C., Nov. 17, 1861.

Mr. HOLDEN: I am sure that you will esteem worthy of notice in the columns of your valuable paper, the generosity of a free colored woman, Ann Grinton, living in the family of Dr. Calloway, towards the soldiers of this country, to whom is repeatedly sending article of apparel and food, which the soldier must appreciate – and seldom an opportunity passes that she does not largely contribute. I subjoin a list of articles that she contributed towards a box, the packing of which came under my supervisions, recently.

Respectfully, H.P.C.

1 bed quilt, 1 bed tick, 3 pair socks, 1 pillow case, 1 pound feathers, 4 pair woolen gloves, 8 linen towels, 3 bottles brandy, 3 bottles blackberry wine, 1 parcel of red-pepper, 4 boxes prepared mustard, 1 bottle R.R. Relief, 2 bars turpentine soap, jar of butter 10 ¾ pounds, 2 bottles sweet pickle, jar of quince preserves, 2 large pound cakes, ginger-cakes, loaf of rusk, 2 loaves of light bread, 2 bushels apples, 1 bushel chestnuts, 1 peck of onions, a parcel of dog-wood, cabbage and wild cherry.

Weekly Standard, Raleigh, 4 December 1861.

In the 1860 census of Upper Division, Wilkes County: Ann Grinton, 25, Phebe Grinton, 3 months, and Roxan Harris, 21, in the household of Jas. Callaway, physician.

North Carolina Certificate of Death: Ann Grinton. Died 5 June 1925, Wilkesboro, Wilkes County. Colored. Divorced from Sag Hampton. Born 1830 in Wilkes County to unknown parents. Buried Harris G.Y. Informant, Jim Williams. 

Demory applies for Confederate pension.

SOLDIER’S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF BLADEN  }

On this 7 day of July, A.D. 1913, personally appeared before me W.J. Davis, C.S.C. in and for the State and County aforesaid, John Demory, age 67 years, and a resident at Elizabethtown post-office, in said County and State, and who, being duly sworn, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the pension under the provisions of an act entitled “An act for the relief of certain Confederate Soldiers, Sailors and Widows,” ratified March 8, 1907; that he is the identical Jno. Demory who enlisted in Co. [blank], Reg., N.C. State Troops, on or about [blank] day of [blank], 1861, to serve in the armies as cook and servant for Col. Jno. H. McDowell (Col for 1st N.C. Regiment) and afterward as servant for Dr. Jim Robinson at South Port N.C. of the late Confederate States, and that while in service at [blank] in the State of [blank], on or about [blank] day of [blank], 186[blank], he received a wound or wounds, etc. [description] [blank].

He further states:

That he is, and has been for twelve months immediately preceding this Application for Pension, a bona fide resident of North Carolina; that he holds no office under the United States, or any State or County, from which he is receiving the sum of three hundred dollars as fees or as salary annually; that he is not worth in his own right, or the right of his wife, property at its assessed value for taxation to the amount of five hundred dollars ($500), or has he disposed of property of such value by gift or voluntary conveyance since the 11th of March, 1885; and that he is not receiving any aid from the State of North Carolina or under any other statue providing for the relief of the maimed and blind soldiers of the State.   Jno X Demory

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 13 day of July, 1913.  /s/ W.J. Davis

Also personally appeared before me Dr. Newton Robinson, who resides at Elizabethtown post-office, in said County and State, a person whom I know to be respectable and entitled to credit, and being by me duly sworn, says he acquainted with John Demory, the applicant for pension, and has every reason to believe that he is the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the facts set forth in this affidavit are correct to the best of his knowledge and belief, and that he has no interest, direct or indirect, in this claim. /s/ Newton Robinson

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 13 day of July, 1913.  /s/ W.J. Davis

[“Disallowed Servant not a soldier”]

From the file of John Demory, North Carolina, Confederate Soldiers and Widows Pension Applications 1885-1953. http://FamilySearch.org. Original, North Carolina State Archives.

The war effort.

CHAPEL HILL. – A letter from a friend at Chapel Hill informs us that a full company of Volunteers under Capt. Richard J. Ashe left that place on Saturday last. It comprised about 20 of the Students and the choice spirits of the community. A fund of about $1600 was cheerfully contributed in the village, and wagons loaded with provisions had been coming in from the country for some days. The free negro population asked the privilege of contributing, and gave from $10 to $15 each. A free washerwoman whose husband is a slave went out and collected $5 to expend for provisions for the company. Our correspondent says justly, that with God’s help a people so united cannot be overcome by any nation.

A large party of slaves and free men of color were assembled here on Saturday last, from the town and county, ready to start for labor at Fort Caswell, but instructions were received to send no more, and they were reluctantly disbanded.

Carolina Observer, Fayetteville, 29 April 1861.

Yankees and negroes.

YANKEE RAIDS IN NORTH CAROLINA – ARREST OF CITIZENS – STAMPEDE OF NEGROES

During the past three or four weeks, those counties in North Carolina bordering upon the Virginia lines of the Federal army, have been subjected to a series of the most dastardly and vindictive guerilla raids that have yet characterized the war in that quarter. The counties of Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck and Gates have suffered the most severely, from arrests of many of their principal citizens, robberies and burnings of property, and the excitement of negroes to revolt and escape.

About two weeks ago, ninety-four slaves and a party of free negroes, through the medium of Yankee inducement, stampeded from the upper part of Pasquotank and fled into the Dismal Swamp. The comprised whole families – old and young, male and female. One of the free negroes, who was doubtless dictator of the whole party, was an “aristocrat” at home, and worth some four or five thousand dollars. A number of the inhabitants of the county immediately followed in pursuit, and recovered fifty or sixty of the slaves, and found a considerable quantity of ammunition in their camp.

On the following night, a young and estimable man, named Joseph Williams, in company with two others, went on patrol to the halfway house on the Dismal Swamp Canal, and kept watch for the runaways. They soon perceived a party of negroes, about thirty in number, approaching, led by white men, supposed to be Yankees, and upon hailing them, they were fired upon by the approaching party, and young Williams was mortally wounded. He, however, raised his gun, took aim, and together with his companions, fired upon them, wounded one negro and killed two others. The rest fled, and the wounded negro was captured. Young Williams died on the spot from the effect of his wound.

…  Richmond Enquirer, 31st.

Carolina Observer, Fayetteville, 4 August 1862.

He went off as a free man.

$300 REWARD. – Escaped from the fortifications in Wilmington, North Carolina, in May or June last, my man GEORGE WASHINGTON. Yellow complexion; he has a small scar on his left cheek, kinky head of hair, twenty-two or three years old, about five feet six inches high, pleasing appearance and speech.

George Washington was raised in Franklin county, North Carolina, by David Ingram, near Laurel post office. I understand that he went off from Wilmington with some Southern soldiers to Richmond as a free man. I will pay the above reward of three hundred dollars for his apprehension, and delivered to Lieutenant Colonel John L. Harris, Twenty-fourth regiment North Carolina Troops, Petersburg, or to Robert Lumpkin, Richmond, or to me at Roxboro, Person county, North Carolina.  JAMES HOLLOWAY.

Richmond Examiner, Richmond VA, 3 December 1864.

One way or the other, salt-making.

WANTED IMMEDIATELY.

75 Hands to Cut and Cord Wood and boil SALT. Being in the employ of the State making Salt, exempts from Military duty. Free negroes will be hired and paid promptly soldiers wages, and furnished rations, and should they fail to come up, I am authorized to impress them, and will do so immediately. Any one noticing this advertisement will confer a favor upon those wanting Salt, by explaining to and sending forward any hands, white or black, address or call on me at the office of T.C. & B.G. Worth, Wilmington.

J.M. WORTH, State Salt Com’r. May 28.

Carolina Observer, Fayetteville, 9 June 1862.

She put her pretty gold head on his shoulder, and …

An Interview with Adora Rienshaw of 431 South Bloodworth Street, Raleigh.

I wuz borned at Beulah, down hyar whar Garner am now, an’ my parents wuz Cameron an’ Sally Perry. When I wuz a month old we moved ter Raleigh.

We wuz called ‘Ole Issues’, case we wuz mixed wid de whites. My pappy wuz borned free, case his mammy wuz a white ‘oman an’ his pappy wuz a coal-black nigger man. Hit happened in Mississippi, do’ I doan know her name ‘cept dat she wuz a Perry.

She wuz de wife of grandfather’s marster an’ dey said dat he wuz mean ter her. Grandfather wuz her coachman an’ he often seed her cry, an’ he’d talk ter her an’ try ter comfort her in her troubles, an’ dat’s de way dat she come ter fall in love wid him.

One day, he said, she axed him ter stop de carriage an’ come back dar an’ talk ter her. When he wuz back dar wid her she starts ter cry an’ she puts her purtty gold haid on his shoulder, an’ she tells him dat he am her only friend, an’ dat her husban’ won’t eben let her have a chile.

Hit goes on lak dis till her husban’ fin’s out dat she am gwine ter have de baby. Dey says dat he beats her awful an’ when pappy wuz borned he jist about went crazy. Anyhow pappy wuz bound out till he wuz twenty-one an’ den he wuz free, case no person wid ary a drap of white blood can be a slave.

When he wuz free he comed ter Raleigh an’ from de fust I can remember he wuz a blacksmith an’ his shop wuz on Wolcot’s Corner. Dar wuz jist three of us chilluns, Charlie, Narcissus, an’ me an’ dat wuz a onusual small family.

Before de war Judge Bantin’s wife teached us niggers on de sly, an’ atter de war wuz over de Yankees started Hayes’s school. I ain’t had so much schoolin’ but I teached de little ones fer seberal years.

De Southern soldiers burned de depot, which wuz between Cabarrus an’ Davie Streets den, an’ dat wuz ter keep de Yankees from gittin’ de supplies. Wheeler’s Cavalry wuz de meanest troops what wuz.

De Yankees ain’t got much in Raleigh, case de Confederates has done got it all an’ gone. Why fer a long time dar de way we got our salt wuz by boilin’ de dirt from de smoke house floor where de meat has hung an’ dripped.

I’m glad slavery is ober, eben do’ I ain’t neber been no slave. But I tell yo’ it’s bad ter be a ‘Ole Issue.’

In the 1860 census of Raleigh, Wake County: Cameron Perry, 48, blacksmith, wife Sarah, and children Adora, 7, Narcissa, 5, Charley, 3, plus Susan Cuffy, 70, and Henderson Duntson, 21; all mulatto except Susan, whose color designation was left blank.

Now, you see, my father was a free man.

William Scott

William Scott: Ex-Slave Story, 401 Church St., 77 years old.

My name is William Scott. I live at 401 Church Street, Raleigh, North Carolina. I wuz born 1860, March 31st. I wuz free born. My father wuz William Scott. I wuz named after my father. My mother wuz Cynthia Scott. She wuz a Scott before she wuz married to my father. She wuz born free. As far back as I can learn on my mother’s side they were always free.

My mother and father always told me my grandfather wuz born of a white woman. My grandfather wuz named Elisha Scott. I have forgot her name. If I heard her name called I have forgot it. My grandfather on my mother’s side wuz a Waverly. I can’t tell you all about dese white folks, but some of ’em, when they died, left their property to mulattoes, or half-breed children, and several of them are living in this community now. I can tell you exactly where they are, and where they got their property. Some of them are over half white. They were by a Negro woman who wuz a mulatto and a white man. Dey air so near white you can’t tell them from white folks. This condition has existed as long ago as I have any recollection, and it still exists, but there are not as many children according to the relations as used to be.

Free Negroes were not allowed to go on the plantations much. Now you see my father wuz a free man. We lived right here in town. My father wuz a ditcher and slave gitter. One night the man he worked for got up a crowd and come to whup him and take his money away from him. He had paid father off that day. Dat night dey come an’ got him an’ blindfolded him. He moved the blindfold from over his eyes and run an’ got away from ’em. He never did go back no more to the man he had been workin’ for. I wuz a little boy, but I heard pappy tell it. Dat wuz tereckly after de surrender. Pappy saw the man he had been workin’ for when he slipped the blindfold off his face, and he knowed him.

I wuz a boy when the Yankees came to Raleigh. They came in on the Fayetteville Road. They stopped and quartered at the edge of the town. I remember they had a guardhouse to put the Yankees in who disobeyed. Later on they came in from the east and quartered at the old Soldiers Home right in there, but not in the buildings. There were no houses there when the Yankees came. They had some houses there. They built ’em. They stayed there a good while until all the Yankees left. When the Yankees first came in they camped over near Dix Hill, when they come into town you hardly knew where they come from. They were jist like blue birds. They jist covered the face of the earth. They came to our house and took our sumpin’ to eat. Yes sir, they took our sumpin’ to eat from us Negroes. My daddy didn’t like deir takin’ our rations so he went to de officer and tole him what his men had done, and the officers had sumpin’ to eat sent over there.

My mammy cooked some fur de officers too. Dey had a lot of crackers. Dey called ’em hard tack. The officers brought a lot of ’em over dere. We lived near the Confederate trenches jist below the Fayetteville Crossin’ on Fayetteville Street. The breastworks were right near our house.

I know when the colored men farmed on share craps, dey were given jist enough to live on, and when a white man worked a mule until he wuz worn out he would sell him to de colored man. De colored man would sometime buy ‘im a old buggy; den he wuz called rich. People went to church den on steer carts, that is colored folks, most uv ’em. De only man I wurked for along den who wud gib me biscuit through de week wuz a man named June Goodwin. The others would give us biscuit on Sundays, and I made up my mind den when I got to be a man to eat jist as many biscuits as I wanted; and I have done jist dat.

My mammy used to hire me out to de white folks. I worked and made jist enough to eat and hardly enough clothes to wear to church until I wuz a man. I worked many a day and had only one herrin’ and a piece of bread for dinner. You know what a herrin’ fish is? ‘Twon’t becase I throwed my money away, twas cause we didn’t git it, nuther to save up. When we farmed share crap dey took all we made. In de fall we would have to split cord wood to live through de winter.

I will tell you now how I got my start off now, I am going to use dis man’s name. I went to work for a man name George Whitaker. I drive a wagon for him. He ‘lowed me all de waste wood for my own use. This wuz wood dat would not sell good on de market. I hauled it over home. I worked for him till he died, en his wife lowed me a little side crap. I made this crap, took de money I got for it, and built a little storehouse. I disremember how long I worked fer Mis’ Hannah Whitaker. Den I quit work for her and went to work for myself. I owns dat little storehouse yit, de one I worked wid Mis’ Hannah Whitaker, en from dat I bought me a nudder home.

When de Yankees come to Raleigh dere wuz a building dey called de Governor’s Palace, it stood whur de Auditorium now stands. Right back o’ where de courthouse now stands wuz a jail and a gallows an’ a whuppin’ pos’ all dere together. I know when dey built de Penitentiary dey hauled poles from Johnston County. Dey called dem Johnston County poles. Dey hauled em in on trains. Dis post office wuz not built den. De post office den wuz built of plank set up an’ down.

I remember seeing a man hung down at de jail. His name wuz Mills. He wuz a white man. When he got on de scaffold he said, ‘What you gwine to do to me do it quick and be done wid it’.

I think Abraham Lincoln done the colored man a heap of good. If it hadn’t been for Mr. Roosevelt there are many livin’ today who would have parished to death. There are plenty of people walkin’ about now who would have been dead if Mr. Roosevelt had not helped them. The only chance I had to hold my home wuz a chance given me through him. At my age, I cannot make much at work, but through things he helped me, and I is holding my own.

From Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves (1841).

In the 1850 census of Raleigh, Wake County: Alfred Wavy, 25, Kazina, 38, Lewis H. Wavy, 2, and Syntha H. Scott, 14. But: in Camp Creek, Rutherford County: William Scott, 25, Cynda, 17, Rufus, 16, Wesley, 15, and Mary Scott, 6 months.

In the 1860 census of Alamance County: Wm. Scott, 24, fireman, wife Synthia, 23, and children May J., 3, Saml, 1, and Jane, 2 months.

William Scott. Died 14 June 1945, Raleigh, Wake County. Resided 601 Church St. Colored. Widower. Laborer. Born 5 Aug 1852 in Wake County to William Scott and Senthia Scott. Buried Mount Hope, Raleigh. Informant, Pinkie Hall.

Not considered white.

61 N.C. Confederate Levi Cummings.  Cap’t Francis D. Koonce’s Co. (Koonce’s State Guerillas) N.C. Volunteers. Appears on Company Muster-In and Descriptive Roll of the organization named above. Dated Jones County, July 22, 1862. Born Duplin Co., N.C. Age 26. Laborer. Enlisted July 14, 1862 in Jones County by F.D. Koonce.  … Note: This company is mustered in the service of the State of North Carolina as “guerillas” for local service, to operate east of the Wilmington & Weldon Rail Road, between the Neuse and Cape Fear Rivers.

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61 N.C. Confederate Levi Cummings.  Pvt. Co. K, 61 Reg’t N.C. Inf. (State Troops). Cap’t Francis D. Koonce’s Co. (Koonce’s State Guerillas) N.C. Volunteers. Appears on Company Muster Roll of the organization named above. Dated May and June 1863. Enlisted August 30, 1862, Jones County, by Capt. Koonce. Last paid by Capt. Anderson, April 30, 1863. “Detailed as ambulance driver.”

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61 N.C. Confederate Levi B. Cummings. Pvt. Co. K, 61 Reg’t N.C. Inf. (State Troops). Cap’t Francis D. Koonce’s Co. (Koonce’s State Guerillas) N.C. Volunteers. Appears on Company Muster Roll of the organization named above. Dated July and August 1863. Enlisted August 30, 1862, Jones County, by Capt. Koonce for 3 years. “Not considered white and dropped by order.”

Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Organized For the State of North Carolina, National Archives and Records Administration.

In the 1850 census of North Division, Duplin County: James C. Cummings, 47, farmer, wife Rebecca, 42, and children Levi W., 13, John J., 11, Betsey A., 9, Sarah L., 7, and Mary J., 5, all mulatto.

In the 1860 census of Tuckahoe, Jones County: Levi Commins, 20, and sister Sallie, 15; described as black.

In the 1870 census of Tuckahoe, Jones County: Levi Cummings, 34, mulatto, cooper.

In the 1880 census of Richlands, Onslow County: Levi Cummings, 50, works on farm, wife Caroline, 25, and children William H., 9, Minnie J., 6, and Lydia A., 2.  Levi is described as mulatto; his wife and children, as white.