Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Category: Runaways

Runaway bound boy, no. 14.

FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the Subscriber on the 17th of October last, a colored Boy named THOMAS WALDEN, about eight years old. I understand said boy is about Donald Street’s, in Moore county. I will give the above reward for his delivery to me at Emerson’s Tan Yard, Chatham county. Said boy was bound to me by the County Court, I therefore forewarn all persons from harboring him, as I intend to enforce the law against the aggressor.  DANIEL CAMPBELL.  October 23rd, 1841.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 3 November 1841.

Runaway bound boy, no. 13.

RUNAWAY

From the Subscriber on the 5th inst., an indentured colored boy named JIM WESLEY, about 15 years old. He is a bright mulatto, and has a downcast look when spoken to. Persons are cautioned against harboring or employing him. Anyone arresting the boy and returning him to me at Fayetteville will be liberally rewarded.   DAVID McDUFFIE. July 28th, 1855.

The North-Carolinian (Fayetteville), 4 August 1855.

Runaway bound boy, no. 12.

RANAWAY

FROM me, in October last, HENRY MARTIN, a free boy of color, about 18 years of age. The said Martin is a bound apprentice to me. All persons are hereby forbid harboring or trusting him on my account. Any person so doing will be prosecuted to the extent of the law. J.G. SMITH Fayetteville, Dec’r 6, 1856.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 8 December 1856.

Runaway bound boy, no. 11.

TWENTY SHILLINGS REWARD.

Run away last night, from the subscriber, an apprenticed negro boy, named Bill, known generally as Bill Copper, a light mulatto about 14 years of age. Any person taking up said boy, and sending him to me at Roanoke-island by any vessel bound there, shall receive the above reward, and all reasonable expences. HENRY KENNEDY. Edenton, June 4, 1794.

The State Gazette of North-Carolina (New Bern), 6 June 1794.

Runaway bound boy, no. 10.

Carolina_Watchman_27_Feb_1851_Bound_boy

Carolina Watchman (Salisbury), 27 February 1851.

‘Tis supposed he is harbored by a free negro.

State of North Carolina, Craven County, ss.

By RICHARD ELLIS, and WILLIAM TISDALE, Esquires, two of the Justices for the said County.

NEWBERN, June 27, 1777.

WHEREAS complaint hath been made to us, by James Davis, that a negro fellow named SMART, very black, about 5 feet 8 inches high, well made, and very likely, speaks broken English, but very artful and insinuateing, is run away, and is supposed to be lurking about committing many acts of felony.

These are therefore to command the said slave forthwith to surrender himself, and return home to his said Master. And we do also require the Sheriff of the said County to make diligent search and pursuit after the said slave, and him having found, to apprehend and secure, so that he may be conveyed to his said Master, or otherwise discharged as the law directs. And the said sheriff is hereby empowered to raise and take with him such power of his County that he shall think fit, for apprehending the said slave. And we do hereby, by virtue of an act of assembly of this state concerning servants and slaves, intimate and declare, if the said slave doth not surrender himself, and return home, immediately after the publication of these presents, that then any person may kill or destroy the said slave, by such means as he or they may think fit, without accusation or impeachment of any crime or offence for so doing, or without incurring any penalty or forfeiture thereby. RICHARD ELMS, WILLIAM TISDALE.

N.B. ‘Tis supposed he is harboured about South River, by one Abel Carter, a free negro, as he has been seen there several times. I will give fifty dollars if delivered to me at Green Springs, or 20 dollars for his head. JAMES DAVIS.

North Carolina Weekly Gazette (New Bern), 14 November 1778.

In the 1790 census of Craven County, Abel Carter is head of a household of seven free people of color.

20 dollars for his head.

State of North Carolina, Craven County, ss.

By RICHARD ELLIS, and WILLIAM TISDALE, Esquires, two of the Justices for the said County.

NEWBERN, June 27, 1777.

WHEREAS complaint hath been made to us, by James Davis, that a negro fellow named SMART, very black, about 5 feet 8 inches high, well made, and very likely, speaks broken English, but very artful and insinuateing, is run away, and is supposed to be lurking about committing many acts of felony.

These are therefore to command the said slave forthwith to surrender himself, and return home to his said Master. And we do also require the Sheriff of the said County to make diligent search and pursuit after the said slave, and him having found, to apprehend and secure, so that he may be conveyed to his said Master, or otherwise discharged as the law directs. And the said sheriff is hereby empowered to raise and take with him such power of his County that he shall think fit, for apprehending the said slave. And we do hereby, by virtue of an act of assembly of this state concerning servants and slaves, intimate and declare, if the said slave doth not surrender himself, and return home, immediately after the publication of these presents, that then any person may kill or destroy the said slave, by such means as he or they may think fit, without accusation or impeachment of any crime or offence for so doing, or without incurring any penalty or forfeiture thereby. RICHARD ELMS, WILLIAM TISDALE.

N.B. ‘Tis supposed he is harboured about South River, by one Abel Carter, a free negro, as he has been seen there several times. I will give fifty dollars if delivered to me at Green Springs, or 20 dollars for his head. JAMES DAVIS.

The North Carolina Weekly Gazette (New Bern), 14 November 1778.

No thanks.

FIVE CENTS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the subscriber on the 15th February last, a free negro girl named EDNY MANOR, an indented apprentice. She is tall, of light complexion and about 16 years of age. All persons are hereby warned not to harbor or employ said girl, under the penalty of the law. The above reward will be given and no thanks, to any person who will apprehend and deliver her to me. E. FERGUSON. Newbern, March 7th, 1848.

The Newbernian and North Carolina Advocate, 21 March 1848.

Much credit is due.

ATTEMPTED ABDUCTION OF A SLAVE.

The Schr. Dolphin, Samuel Salyear master of this port, left here 15 days ago bound for New York. Shortly after leaving the bar, the cook, James Corbell, a free colored man, seeing one of the crew, a colored man, frequently carrying water down the hold, suspected something was wrong and communicated his suspicions to the captain, who ordered the mate to make search; who on examination found a slave man secreted in the hold, named Edward, belonging to the estate of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Justice of this town. The boy had been concealed on board through the agency of two free colored men, Tom Fortune and Furny Moore, two of the crew. The captain immediately put into Norfolk Va., where the Dolphin arrived on the 10th instant. The captain immediately brought the case before the Mayor, and upon examination Edward was committed to jail to await the requisition of his owner, and Fortune and Moore were committed for trial for the abduction of the slave. Their trial of course must take place here, and the Governor of our State will demand them from the State of Virginia, Much credit is due the captain and the cook for their promptness in this matter. The above particulars we gather mostly from the Norfolk Herald of the 12th instant.   Newbernian.

The North-Carolina Star (Raleigh), 28 July 1847.

——

SUPERIOR COURT.

The fall term of Superior Court for this county was held last week. The most important case tried was that of a free negro sailor, Tom Fortune, for his life, charged with aiding a slave to escape into a free state. The slave was discovered in the hold of the vessel after she had got to sea, when the Captain put into Norfolk and lodged in jail the slave and the negros suspected of assisting him to escape. The jury returned a verdict of not guilty, the testimony not being sufficient to prove that he knew the slave was on board until he was discovered at sea. Messrs. Stevenson and Sparrow were employed on the defence.

Eastern Carolina Republican (New Bern), 3 November 1847.

His wife left with him.

Image

See Gatsey Pittman here.

Wilmington Advertiser, 22 December 1837.