Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Category: Runaways

Surly when spoken to.

$10 REWARD.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, on the night of the 7th instant, a bound mulatto girl, aged between 15 and 17, named ELIZA LUNCE. Said girl is a dark mulatto, tolerably well grown for her age, and is surly when spoken to. She will no doubt take some other name than her real one. She was enticed away by her mother, Nancy Lunce, and Rowland Jones, a free man of color.

I will give ten dollars to any one who will deliver said girl to me, or five dollars for her confinement in any jail in the State so that I get her again. The subscriber resides six miles North of Raleigh, N.C.   EDWARD CHAPPELL.

February 12, 1853.

Says he became dissatisfied and ran away.

NOTICE.

WAS COMMITTED TO THE JAIL OF DUPLIN County, about the 15th inst., a negro man who says his name is JACOB WARREN. Said negro was taken up and committed as a runaway slave, but says that he is a free man of color. He says that he was hired to Isaac P. Lee and John Kittrel, in Brunswick County, and became dissatisfied and ranaway. Said negro is about 5 feet 6 inches high, thick set, and a tolerably bright mulatto. Any one claiming said negro will come forward, prove property, pay charges and take him away, or he will be dealt with according to law. PATRICK MERRITT, Jailor.

July 2d 1858.

Wilmington Journal, 27 August 1858.

His half-brother — and owner — are free men of color.

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the Subscriber, on the 19th inst., a Negro man named LUKE, about five feet six or eight inches high, dark complected, has a scar on the side of one of his eyes, (which one not recollected, but believed to be the right eye,) stout built, weighs about 175 or 180 pounds.

He was purchased in 1846 from Mr. Josiah E. Bryan of this town. He has relatives in the County of Sampson, among them a half-brother named Sam Boon, — a free man of color, — and may possibly be lurking in that neighborhood, as I am informed he was seen about there a short time since. Possibly he may have obtained free papers, and is endevouring to escape to a free State, as I understand some free persons of color removed from Sampson county last week to Indiana.

A reward of Ten Dollars will be given for his apprehension and delivery to me, if taken in this county; Fifteen Dollars if taken in any other county in this State and lodged in a safe Jail; or Fifty Dollars if taken out of state — so that I get him again.  M.N. LEARY.

Fayetteville, March 29, 1853.

Fayetteville Observer, 7 April 1853.

 

He strove to entice.

A Free Negro Entices a Slave to Runaway

Kit Huffman, a free negro who was tried for murder last spring in our Court, has enticed a boy, the property of Wm. Cade, Esq., of this place, to run away with him and go North. It seems that for some time past he had been striving to entice two of Mr. Cade’s boys (brothers) away, and prevailed upon one to do so. Kitt was up here on Wednesday, but left in the boat for Wilmington, just one hour before the officer arrived at the wharf. It is expected that he will leave the boat at White Hall or some place between this and Wilmington, and meet the boy at some place before arranged upon. Kitt is a bright mulatto, about 5 feet 11 inches or 6 feet high. The citizens of this and adjoining counties ought to keep good look out for them. – Fay. Carolinian.

Wilmington Daily Herald, 20 February 1860.

She might have gone off with him.

$10 Reward.

RANAWAY from the Subscriber, about the 15th ult. a negro woman named HANNAH; formerly the property of Col. Edward Williams, of Onslow County, but more recently owned by Richard Saunders, Esq. Hannah is above the ordinary size, black complexion – about Forty years of age. – She has relations in Onslow county and at Rocky Point.

She has, for some years past, been living with a free colored man named Isaac Scott, who has left this place, and she might have gone off with him.

I will give the above reward for her apprehension, upon delivery to me at Wilmington, or confinement in any jail, so that I may recover her. ANN GUTHRIE. Wilmington, Sept. 11th, 1835.

Wilmington People’s Press and Advertiser, 25 September 1835.

Barnes, or Burns, or Copage, or Farmer.

$125 REWARD

will be paid for the delivery of the said HARRY to me at Tossnot Depot, Edgecombe county, or for his confinement in any Jail in the State so that I can get home, or One Hundred and Fifty Dollars will be given for his head.

He was lately heard from in New-Bern where he called himself Henry Barnes (or Burns), and will likely continue the same name, or assume that of Copage or Farmer. He has a free mulatto woman for a wife, by the name of Sally Bozeman, who has lately removed to Wilmington, and lives in that part of the town called Texas, where he will likely be lurking.

Master of vessels are particularly cautioned against harboring, employing, or concealing the said negro on board their vessels, as the full penalty of the law will be rigorously enforced. GUILFORD HORN.   June 29th, 1850

Eastern Carolina Republican (New Bern), 20 November 1850.

Runaway bound boy, no. 18.

SUPERIOR COURT. – The Term closed on Saturday. The three prisoners from Bladen were refused bail, and were remanded to prison.

Andrew Jackson Evans was tried for the murder of Joseph Williams, (both free colored,) in this town on the 30th ult. The jury rendered a verdict of manslaughter, and the Court sentenced the prisoner to receive 49 lashes and pay a fine of $100. For the State, B.R. Huske, Esq. (the Solicitor being indisposed.) For the prisoner, Gen. John Winslow and Messrs. C.G. Wright and Neill McKay.

A Special Term was ordered, for the trial of Civil Causes, (which were necessarily almost entirely neglected at this Term,) to be held on the 2d Monday in February. – Fay. Observer.

Wilmington Daily Herald, 21 November 1856.

——

TO THE PUBLIC.

NOTICE is hereby given to all persons against their employing Andrew Jackson Evans, a free boy of color, as his services belong to me, as Agent. Any one employing him after this public notice, and paying him, will subject themselves to a second payment, besides laying themselves liable for damages. G.S. DEMING, Agt. Jan’y 18.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 23 January 1860.

[Clarification: As I learned when I found the top article after posting the bottom, A.J. Evans was not an apprentice at all. Rather, he had been “sold” to Deming for a period of time to pay off his fines. — LYH]

Runaway bound boy, no. 17.

$5 Reward.

Runaway from the subscriber, on the 15th August, a free negro known here by the name of Bill Walker, an indented apprentice to the blacksmith’s trade. He is about 20 years old, and stutters badly. I will pay the above reward for him delivered to me.  D.H. DILL.  Oct. 2, 1850

North State Whig (Washington), 2 October 1850.

Runaway bound boy, no. 16.

Five Dollars Reward.

RUNAWAY from the subscriber on the 24th ult. A free colored boy named Josiah Price, an indented apprentice. He is about 14 years of age, very dark apprentice mulatto, and about 5 feet 2 or 3 inches high. It is believed he is lurking in the neighborhood of Gates Court House, where he has a grandmother, and two brothers named Jim and Peter Price, who will no doubt make exertions to conceal him. I will give the above reward and pay all necessary expenses to any person, who will deliver him to me, or so confine him that I get him again.  LEM’L SKINNER.  Chowan Co. Nov. 9th 1831.

Edenton Gazette, 23 November 1831.

Runaway bound boy, no. 15.

Five Cents Reward.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, a few weeks since, an indented Apprentice by the name of EPHRAIM BURNETT; he is a dark complected colored boy, 15 to 16 years of age. Whoever will apprehend and deliver the said Boy to me in Fayetteville, shall be entitled to the above reward, but no thanks or charges. All persons are forbid harboring or employing him in any manner whatever.  JAMES BAKER. September 8, 1834.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 23 December 1834.