Saint Anthony’s fire.

by Lisa Y. Henderson

TARBOROUGH, FEBRUARY 15.

The Disease. – Since our notice, two weeks since, of the fatal disease which raged in the family of Mr. James Ellinor, in this county, his negro woman, Cain Hammonds a free negro man living with him, and the wife of Benjamin Anderson have died with the same disease – making seven deaths in all! – Eli Parker, James Ellinor and wife, their cook, and Hammonds, five at Mr. Ellinor’s house – Edward G. Thompson, in this place, who attended Mr. Parker and caught the disease from him – and Mrs. Anderson, living near there, who visited the family.  The others that were attacked, have recovered or are convalescent.  The disease is still variously designated St. Anthony’s fire, black tongue, &c. We are informed by our physicians that there is now no case of it in the county. – Press.

Carolina Watchman, Salisbury, 1 March 1845.

Saint Anthony’s fire, or erysipelas, is an acute bacterial skin and subcutaneous tissue infection.  It is indeed contagious.