Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: runaway

Runaway bound boy, no. 15.

Five Cents Reward.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, a few weeks since, an indented Apprentice by the name of EPHRAIM BURNETT; he is a dark complected colored boy, 15 to 16 years of age. Whoever will apprehend and deliver the said Boy to me in Fayetteville, shall be entitled to the above reward, but no thanks or charges. All persons are forbid harboring or employing him in any manner whatever.  JAMES BAKER. September 8, 1834.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 23 December 1834.

Runaway bound boy, no. 14.

FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the Subscriber on the 17th of October last, a colored Boy named THOMAS WALDEN, about eight years old. I understand said boy is about Donald Street’s, in Moore county. I will give the above reward for his delivery to me at Emerson’s Tan Yard, Chatham county. Said boy was bound to me by the County Court, I therefore forewarn all persons from harboring him, as I intend to enforce the law against the aggressor.  DANIEL CAMPBELL.  October 23rd, 1841.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 3 November 1841.

Runaway bound boy, no. 13.

RUNAWAY

From the Subscriber on the 5th inst., an indentured colored boy named JIM WESLEY, about 15 years old. He is a bright mulatto, and has a downcast look when spoken to. Persons are cautioned against harboring or employing him. Anyone arresting the boy and returning him to me at Fayetteville will be liberally rewarded.   DAVID McDUFFIE. July 28th, 1855.

The North-Carolinian (Fayetteville), 4 August 1855.

Runaway bound boy, no. 12.

RANAWAY

FROM me, in October last, HENRY MARTIN, a free boy of color, about 18 years of age. The said Martin is a bound apprentice to me. All persons are hereby forbid harboring or trusting him on my account. Any person so doing will be prosecuted to the extent of the law. J.G. SMITH Fayetteville, Dec’r 6, 1856.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 8 December 1856.

Runaway bound boy, no. 11.

TWENTY SHILLINGS REWARD.

Run away last night, from the subscriber, an apprenticed negro boy, named Bill, known generally as Bill Copper, a light mulatto about 14 years of age. Any person taking up said boy, and sending him to me at Roanoke-island by any vessel bound there, shall receive the above reward, and all reasonable expences. HENRY KENNEDY. Edenton, June 4, 1794.

The State Gazette of North-Carolina (New Bern), 6 June 1794.

Runaway bound boy, no. 10.

Carolina_Watchman_27_Feb_1851_Bound_boy

Carolina Watchman (Salisbury), 27 February 1851.

Armwoods on the lam.

$200 Reward!

Stop the Thieves and runaway Mulattoes.

WHEREAS, sometime ago, Jemima Armwood, a free mulatto woman, for the sum of $200, (to enable her to purchase her husband, named Richard, or commonly called Dick Youngblood, well known in Barnwell District, So. Ca.) bound three of her Girls, named Becky, about 17 years old, Teena, about 14, and Darcas, about 12, to me, to serve as indented servants, and on Thursday, the 8th instant, they inveigled them from my service and removed to parts unknown, taking them my three servants; they besides committed several acts of swindling, theft, outrages, and other rogueries, to myself and others, — such as stealing my sulkey and harness, and selling them in Hamburg, S.C., on the 7th instant; and on the 8th, assaulting and beating a white man, a respectable old gentleman; and many other villainies too numerous to be here inserted.

A reward of $200 dollars will be paid for apprehending the said Jemima, her husband Dick, Becky, Teena, and Darcas, and deliver them to me, or in the Augusta Jail. They have besides five smaller children, one a sucking baby, and may probably have their son, named Daniel, about 22 years of age, all mulattoes, 10 or 11 in number. They started with a cart and a white blind mare; the cart is an uncommon one, it has a very large new body nailed to the shafts, the wheels are from an old gig, originally painted green, but dirty – the axletree of the cart is wood, and the ends that goes in the wheels are iron. Dick is short, about 40 or 50 years of age, illiterate but keen, artful, and well acquainted with the world – most any subject can furnish him with grounds on which to build plausible stories, to secure in his favor the sympathy of others; (and girls are known to be prolific subjects.) Therefore, in order, if possible to counteract his cunning, and as I am not known at a distance, let it be known that I am a married man, with wife and seven small children, the oldest only ten years. I employed the three girls in nursing my small children, and to no other work, and never whipped them; but Dick gave Teena a most unmerciful whipping on the 8th instant, for not robbing me according his directions, and may probably place that whipping too, to my credit, in order to enlist the feelings of others in his favor. – They have been traced to Fayetteville, N.C., and arrived there between the 18th and 26th February. JOHN GUIMARIN, Watch Maker, No. 171, Broad Street. Augusta, Geo. Feb. 23, 1827.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 3 May 1827.

No thanks.

FIVE CENTS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the subscriber on the 15th February last, a free negro girl named EDNY MANOR, an indented apprentice. She is tall, of light complexion and about 16 years of age. All persons are hereby warned not to harbor or employ said girl, under the penalty of the law. The above reward will be given and no thanks, to any person who will apprehend and deliver her to me. E. FERGUSON. Newbern, March 7th, 1848.

The Newbernian and North Carolina Advocate, 21 March 1848.

Much credit is due.

ATTEMPTED ABDUCTION OF A SLAVE.

The Schr. Dolphin, Samuel Salyear master of this port, left here 15 days ago bound for New York. Shortly after leaving the bar, the cook, James Corbell, a free colored man, seeing one of the crew, a colored man, frequently carrying water down the hold, suspected something was wrong and communicated his suspicions to the captain, who ordered the mate to make search; who on examination found a slave man secreted in the hold, named Edward, belonging to the estate of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Justice of this town. The boy had been concealed on board through the agency of two free colored men, Tom Fortune and Furny Moore, two of the crew. The captain immediately put into Norfolk Va., where the Dolphin arrived on the 10th instant. The captain immediately brought the case before the Mayor, and upon examination Edward was committed to jail to await the requisition of his owner, and Fortune and Moore were committed for trial for the abduction of the slave. Their trial of course must take place here, and the Governor of our State will demand them from the State of Virginia, Much credit is due the captain and the cook for their promptness in this matter. The above particulars we gather mostly from the Norfolk Herald of the 12th instant.   Newbernian.

The North-Carolina Star (Raleigh), 28 July 1847.

——

SUPERIOR COURT.

The fall term of Superior Court for this county was held last week. The most important case tried was that of a free negro sailor, Tom Fortune, for his life, charged with aiding a slave to escape into a free state. The slave was discovered in the hold of the vessel after she had got to sea, when the Captain put into Norfolk and lodged in jail the slave and the negros suspected of assisting him to escape. The jury returned a verdict of not guilty, the testimony not being sufficient to prove that he knew the slave was on board until he was discovered at sea. Messrs. Stevenson and Sparrow were employed on the defence.

Eastern Carolina Republican (New Bern), 3 November 1847.

His wife left with him.

Image

See Gatsey Pittman here.

Wilmington Advertiser, 22 December 1837.