Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: debt peonage

Very industrious, good morals … however.

A Valuable Negro Man for Sale.

ON the 4th day of June next, in the Town of Fayetteville, at public Auction, I shall offer for sale, a negro man of middle age, very industrious and of good morals, a painter by Trade. He is known by the name of WILEY P. LASSITER, a free man of color; he has been free all his life till recently, when he made himself a Slave to me, by Indenture, for the consideration of my endorsing a considerable amount of debt for him, and having it to pay. I have allowed him free privileges, as he formerly had, for more than two years, that he might redeem himself, but finding this course unavailing, I shall necessarily resort to the above. Terms will be made known on day of sale.   EMSLEY LASSITER.  May 5, 1858.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 17 May 1858.

Runaway bound boy, no. 18.

SUPERIOR COURT. – The Term closed on Saturday. The three prisoners from Bladen were refused bail, and were remanded to prison.

Andrew Jackson Evans was tried for the murder of Joseph Williams, (both free colored,) in this town on the 30th ult. The jury rendered a verdict of manslaughter, and the Court sentenced the prisoner to receive 49 lashes and pay a fine of $100. For the State, B.R. Huske, Esq. (the Solicitor being indisposed.) For the prisoner, Gen. John Winslow and Messrs. C.G. Wright and Neill McKay.

A Special Term was ordered, for the trial of Civil Causes, (which were necessarily almost entirely neglected at this Term,) to be held on the 2d Monday in February. – Fay. Observer.

Wilmington Daily Herald, 21 November 1856.

——

TO THE PUBLIC.

NOTICE is hereby given to all persons against their employing Andrew Jackson Evans, a free boy of color, as his services belong to me, as Agent. Any one employing him after this public notice, and paying him, will subject themselves to a second payment, besides laying themselves liable for damages. G.S. DEMING, Agt. Jan’y 18.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 23 January 1860.

[Clarification: As I learned when I found the top article after posting the bottom, A.J. Evans was not an apprentice at all. Rather, he had been “sold” to Deming for a period of time to pay off his fines. — LYH]

Sold for taxes.

RUNAWAY from the subscriber on Saturday night, the 28th of April, a free negro boy calling himself BRYANT OXYDIM.  He was sold in February last at Sheriff’s sale for his taxes, until December next for which time I purchased him.  For the last two or three years he has been living about Watkinsville.  Bryant is about 28 or 30 years of age; about 5 ½ feet high; dark mulatto; spare made; limps slightly in his left leg when walking; his eyes being set very close cause him to appear cross-eyed.  He carried several suits of clothing, made mostly of cheap goods.

Any information respecting him will be thankfully received, and a fair compensation made for arresting him.  It is probable he will make his way to Jasper county, as he came from there.  He was born in North Carolina, and came to Georgia, when very young.  Athens, May 3, 1849.  W.S. Hemphill.

Southern Whig, Athens, Georgia, May __, 1849.