Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Category: Civil War

The Armwoods get certified and paid.

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During the Civil War, free men of color were conscripted to build breastworks on North Carolina’s southern coast. After filing claims, the Armwoods were paid for their two weeks of service — minus the cost of a furnished blanket.

In the 1850 census of Southern District, Sampson County: John Armwood, 50, laborer; Susan, 30; Henderson, 25; Louisa, 20; Henry, 16; Richard, 15; and John Armwood, 13. In the Northern District: James Winn, 33; Buckner L.Bryan, 14; Zachariah Bryan, 13; and Owen Armwood, 24.

Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, National Archives and Record Administration.

In payment of Confederate taxes, no. 2.

Form of the estimate and assessment of agricultural products agreed upon by the assessor and tax-payer, and the value of the portion thereof to which the government is entitled, which is taxed in kind, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11 of “an Act to lay taxes for the common defence and carry on the government of the Confederate States,” said estimate and assessment to be made as soon as the crops are ready for market.

Celia Artis by son

Cured Fodder     Quantity of gross crop. — 2500   Tithe or one-tenth. — 250    Value of one-tenth. — $7.50

I, Celia Artis of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina do swear that the above is a true statement and estimate of all the agricultural products produced by me during the year 1863, which are taxable by the provisions of the 11th section of the above stated act, including what may have been sold of consumed by me, and of the value of that portion of said crops to which the government is entitled.   /s/ Calvin X Artis

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the 29 day of December 1863, and I further certify that the above estimate and assessment has been agreed upon by said Celia Artis and myself as a correct and true statement of the amount of his crops and the value of the portion to which the government is entitled.  /s/ J.A. Lane, Assessor.

Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, National Archives and Record Administration.

In payment of Confederate taxes, no. 1.

Form of the estimate and assessment of agricultural products agreed upon by the assessor and tax-payer, and the value of the portion thereof to which the government is entitled, which is taxed in kind, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11 of “an Act to lay taxes for the common defence and carry on the government of the Confederate States,” said estimate and assessment to be made as soon as the crops are ready for market.

Adam Artis by wife

Cured Fodder     Quantity of gross crop. — 1500     Tithe or one-tenth. — 150     Value of one-tenth. — $4.50

I, Adam Artis of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina do swear that the above is a true statement and estimate of all the agricultural products produced by me during the year 1863, which are taxable by the provisions of the 11th section of the above stated act, including what may have been sold of consumed by me, and of the value of that portion of said crops to which the government is entitled.   /s/ Adam X Artis

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the 3 day of December 1863, and I further certify that the above estimate and assessment has been agreed upon by said Adam Artis and myself as a correct and true statement of the amount of his crops and the value of the portion to which the government is entitled.  /s/ J.A. Lane, Assessor.

The Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865 (NARA M346), often called the “Confederate Citizens File,” is a collection of 650,000 vouchers and other documents relating to goods furnished or services rendered to the Confederate government by private individuals and businesses.

The “Citizens File” was created by the Confederate Archives Division of the Adjutant General’s Office from records created or received by the Confederate War and Treasury Departments that were in the custody of the U.S. War Department. The Citizens File was created to aid in determining the legitimacy of compensation claims submitted for property losses allegedly inflicted by Union forces. The records were used by the Treasury and Justice Departments, Southern Claims Commission, Court of Claims, and congressional claims committees to determine whether the claimant had been loyal to the Union or had aided the Confederate government and thus not eligible for compensation.

[Sidenote: In 1863, Adam Artis was married to Frances Seaberry. They are my great-great-great-grandparents. — LYH]

A widow is denied.

WIDOW’S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF SAMPSON  }

On this 25th day of March, A.D. 1924, personally appeared before me W.F. Semour, C.S.C. in and for the State and County aforesaid, Edith Bizzell, age 68 years, and a resident at Clinton post-office, in said County and State, and who, being duly sworn, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the pension under the provisions of an act entitled “An act to amend and consolidate the pension laws of the State of North Carolina,“ ratified March 8, 1921: That she is the widow of Agrippe Bizzell who enlisted in Company A, 30 Regiment, N.C. State Troops, on or about the [blank] day of April, 1863, to serve in the armies of the late Confederate States.

She further states:

That she was married to the said Soldier or Sailor before the first day of January, 1880;

That she is now a widow, and has been for twelve months immediately preceding this Application for pension a bona fide resident of North Carolina;

That she holds no office under the United States, or any State or County, from which she is receiving the sum of three hundred dollars as fees or as salary annually;

That she is not worth in his own right, or the right of her late husband, property at its assessed value for taxation to the amount of two thousand dollars ($2,000), nor has she disposed of property of such value by gift or voluntary conveyance since the 11th of March, 1885;

That she is not receiving any aid from the State of North Carolina or under any other statue providing for the relief of the maimed and blind soldiers of the State.

“My husband died in August 1918. I am now old and cant work but very little.” /s/ Edith X Bizzell

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 25th day of March, 1924.  /s/ W.F. Semour

Also personally appeared before me Milton Holmes, who resides at Clinton postoffice, in said County and State, a person whom I know to be respectable and entitled to credit, and being by me duly sworn, says he acquainted with Edith Bizzell, the widow of the late Agrippe Bizzell of Company A, 30th Regiment, North Carolina State Troops, and that they  believe her to be the identical person she represents herself to be, and that the facts set forth in this affidavit are correct to the best of his knowledge and belief, and that he has no interest, direct or indirect, in this claim. /s/ Milton X Holmes

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 25th day of March, 1924.  /s/ W.F. Semour

[Disallowed “No Provision for Slaves.” “This applicant is the widow of a Negro Slave who served as stated upon the order of his master, and the same is approved subject to the law as it may apply to such cases.”]

From the file of Agrippe Bizzell, North Carolina, Confederate Soldiers and Widows Pension Applications, 1885-1953, http://FamilySearch.org. Original, North Carolina State Archives.

[Sidenote: In fact, Agrippa Bizzell had been a free man of color. — LYH]

Self-enslavement for profit.

Who was Seller and Who was Sold? Col. Carson Vance lived on Rose’s creek, between Alta Pass and Spruce Pine before and during and after the Civil War. He was a bright, but eccentric man. He was admitted to the bar and practiced law to some extent. But he and a free negro named John Jackson made up a plot at the commencement of the Civil War whereby they were to go together to New Orleans, Vance as master and Jackson as slave. At New Orleans Jackson was to be sold for all the cash he would bring, after which Vance was to disappear. Then Jackson was to prove that he was a “free person of color,” regain his freedom and rejoin Vance on the outskirts of New Orleans. It is said that this scheme worked successfully and that Vance and Jackson divided the proceeds of the sale.

From John Preston Arthur, Western North Carolina: A History from 1730 to 1913 (1914).

Articles collected.

FOR THE OBSERVER.

Messrs. Editors: — Below please find a list of reports handed to me by one of the officers of the Deep River Soldiers’ Aid Society. Please insert in your paper.

Articles Collected by Mrs. J.C. Hooker and Miss P.C. Harris. — … Lydia Goins, (free negress,) lot pepper, soap and balm; Lydia Ransom, (free negress,) lot sage, catnip and bearfoot …

Carolina Observer, Fayetteville, 28 October 1861.

Larter brothers, U.S. Colored Troops.

ImageImageJennings Larter and Alfred Larter were sons of Arthur and Mary Larter, who migrated from Surry County NC to Owen and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, in the early 1850s. The Twenty-eighth U. S. Colored Troops were recruited in Indiana. Six companies were organized at Indianapolis in April, 1864, and turned over to the United States as a battalion of the 28th U. S. Colored infantry.

Compiled Military Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers in the 26th through 30th Infantry Units, and the 29th Connecticut Infantry (Colored). National Archives and Records Administration.

Mainor applies for Confederate pension.

SOLDIER’S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF HARNETT  }                 

On this 15th day of June, A.D. 1924, personally appeared before me L.M. Chaffin, C.S.C. in and for the State and County aforesaid, Geo. W. Mainor, age 85 years, and a resident at Linden post-office, in said County and State, and who, being duly sworn, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the pension under the provisions of an act entitled “An act to amend and consolidate the pension laws of the State of North Carolina,“ ratified March 8, 1921: That he is the identical Geo. W. Mainor who served as laborer on Breastworks at Fort Fisher & Fort Caswell on or about [blank] day of September, 1863 & 1864, to serve in the armies of the late Confederate States, and that while in service at [blank] in the State of [blank], on or about [blank] day of [blank], [blank], he received a wound or wounds, etc. [description] This applicant is an old issue free Negro and served as a workman on the fortifications at Fort Caswell and Fort Fisher.

He further states: That he is, and has been for twelve months immediately preceding this Application for Pension, a bona fide resident of North Carolina;

That he holds no office under the United States, or any State or County, from which he is receiving the sum of three hundred dollars as fees or as salary annually;

That he is not worth in his own right, or the right of his wife, property at its assessed value for taxation to the amount of two thousand dollars ($2,000), nor has he disposed of property of such value by gift or voluntary conveyance since the 11th of March, 1885;

That he is not receiving any aid from the State of North Carolina or under any other statue providing for the relief of the maimed and blind soldiers of the State.   /s/ Geo. X W. Mainor

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 15 day of June, 1929.  /s/ L.M. Chaffin

Also personally appeared before me W.P. Byrd, who resides at Lillington postoffice, in said County and State, a person whom I know to be respectable and entitled to credit, and being by me duly sworn, says he acquainted with Geo. W. Mainor, the applicant for pension, and has every reason to believe that he is the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the facts set forth in this affidavit are correct to the best of his knowledge and belief, and that he has no interest, direct or indirect, in this claim. /s/ W.P. Byrd

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 15 day of June, 1929.  /s/ L.M. Chaffin

[Approved 3 September 1929]

From the file of George Mainor, North Carolina, Confederate Soldiers and Widows Pension Applications, 1885-1953, http://FamilySearch.org. Original, North Carolina State Archives.

Spelman applies for Confederate pension.

SOLDIER’S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF CAMDEN  }

On this 2nd day of July, A.D. 1928, personally appeared before me L.S. Leary, C.S.C. in and for the State and County aforesaid, John Spelman, age [blank] years, and a resident at Linden post-office, in said County and State, and who, being duly sworn, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the pension under the provisions of an act entitled “An act to amend and consolidate the pension laws of the State of North Carolina,“ ratified March 8, 1921: That he is the identical John Spelman who enlisted as a servant in Company A, 56 Regiment, N.C. State Troops, on or about the [1st] day of June, 1861, to serve in the armies of the late Confederate States, and that while in service at Shiloh, in the State of North Carolina, on or about [blank] day of [blank], [blank], he received a wound or wounds, etc. [description]

He further states: that he is, and has been for twelve months immediately preceding this Application for Pension, a bona fide resident of North Carolina;

That he holds no office under the United States, or any State or County, from which he is receiving the sum of three hundred dollars as fees or as salary annually;

That he is not worth in his own right, or the right of his wife, property at its assessed value for taxation to the amount of two thousand dollars ($2,000), nor has he disposed of property of such value by gift or voluntary conveyance since the 11th of March, 1885;

That he is not receiving any aid from the State of North Carolina or under any other statue providing for the relief of the maimed and blind soldiers of the State.   /s/ John X Spelman

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 2nd day of July, 1928.  /s/ L.S. Leary

Also personally appeared before me N.S. Burgess, who resides at Shiloh postoffice, in said County and State, a person whom I know to be respectable and entitled to credit, and being by me duly sworn, says he acquainted with John Spelman, the applicant for pension, and has every reason to believe that he is the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the facts set forth in this affidavit are correct to the best of his knowledge and belief, and that he has no interest, direct or indirect, in this claim. /s/ N.S. Burgess

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 2nd day of July, 1928.  /s/ L.S. Leary

[Approved 21 October 1928]

From the file of John Spelman, North Carolina, Confederate Soldiers and Widows Pension Applications, 1885-1953, http://FamilySearch.org. Original, North Carolina State Archives.

Another colored Confederate.

James A. Locuss, cook, Co. F, 51 Reg’t North Carolina Infantry (State Troops).  Appears on Company Muster Roll of the organization named above for Nov & Dec 1864. Enlisted 31 October 1864 at Richmond, by W. Hamilton for duration of the war.