Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Washington

No good feelings for free negroes.

Mary Brooks, a free woman of color was drowned while drunk at one of the wharves at Washington a few days since. Wouldn’t care if all the free negroes in Newbern were drowned. Also a slave, an old man, was drowned in the river near Washington on Sunday last. Sorry for him. Can respect a slave but have no good feelings for free negroes.

Newbern Daily Progress, 23 April 1859.

One harbored slaves, the other drove away with them.

A negro named Noah C. Hanson charged with harboring two runaway slaves last summer, the property of the Hon. Walter Colcock, was tried in the criminal Court at Washington on Saturday and found guilty. He was fined 1000 dollars and to stand committed until the same was paid.

The Old North State (Elizabeth City), 15 March 1851.

——

Warner Harris, free colored, for driving away Chaplin’s carriage containing the two slaves belonging to Messrs. Stephens and Toombs, was ordered to pay a fine of $150 in each case.

The Old North State (Elizabeth City), 15 March 1851.

Puking, purging, pains.

From the Washington (N.C.) Whig.

HEALTH OF THE TOWN.

Several cases of malignant cholera have occurred in our town. We deem it unnecessary to say much on the subject ourselves, as our readers will find below the detailed report of the Board of Health. This report was handed to us yesterday at noon, and we have heard of no case since. It is now four days since the last case occurred: our citizens are therefore recovering from the panic with which they were at first struck; and several families who then thought of withdrawing from the town, now deem that step quite unnecessary.

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH.

The undersigned, Commissioners and Physicians, constituting a Board of Health for the Town of Washington, under a sense of what they deem their duty to the community, make publick the following cases and facts and occurrences, relative to the health of this town: —

October 8th. Case 1. – A child of a coloured man, living in a low and wet, though central part of the town, and taken in the night with the following symptoms: – puking, purging, pains in the stomach and bowels. When seen by a physician, there was universal coldness of surface, and no perceptible pulse at the wrist. Died at 12 o’clock, A.M. on the 9th.

9th. Case 2. – Winney Pilgreen, a free coloured woman, age not known, but supposed to be about 50 years. When seen by a physician, she was vomiting a glareous fluid, which she said was hot and acid; purging frequent, but small, of a fluid slightly tinged with bile; had pains in the stomach and intestines; spasms of the fingers and in the muscles of the legs and feet; surface of the head, chest and abdomen, below natural temperature; and at the extremities, very cold, shriveled, and inelastic; excessive thirst; complaining of great internal heat; pulse very indistinguishable, being full, soft and feeble; tongue with a thick brown coat upon it. Died on the morning of the 16th.

9th. Case 3. – Philis Brown, mother of the former, sick in an adjoining room. When seen by a physician, had every symptom of preceding case, except that of the pulse; here it was with difficulty perceived, being very small and frequent. Died on the night of the 11th.

10th. Case 6. Jackson, a free mulatto. Habits not known; in appearance, having a strong healthy constitution; previous health not known; taken at 10 o’clock, P.M. Was seen by a physician in an hour after attack, and found with spasms in stomach and intestines; puking and purging colourless matter; cold tongue; pulseless. Died at 5 A.M., on the 11th.

12th. Case 7. – Isaac Pilgreen, a free coloured man. Habits intemperate; by trade a mason; had been intoxicated for the last week, and exposed day and night in attendance on Nancy, his wife. This patient, when taken, was in a state of inebriety. When seen by a physician, which was in less than an hour, the patient was spasmed in stomach and intestines; cramped in the extremities; had puking and purging of this fluid rice-colored matter; cold surface and tongue; pulse nearly extinct. Survived 5 ½ hours.

Newbern Spectator, 24 October 1834.

He owned a shipyard.

Walk west to the Rodman House, located at 520 West Main. This dwelling, constructed in 1848, was once the home of two justices of the North Carolina Supreme Court. Before the house was constructed, a shipyard at the site was opened and operated by Hull Anderson, a free black who later emigrated to Liberia.  Because much of Washington was burned during the Civil War, the Rodman House is one of the few surviving antebellum structures in the town’s historic district.

From Daniel W. Barefoot, Touring the Backroads of North Carolina’s Upper Coast (1995).

See also, http://www.wdnweb.com/2013/02/21/pamlico-rivers-past-hull-anderson-black-shipbuilder-in-1800s-washington/

Competition? Drive it out.

The Mechanics of Washington, N.C., have formed an association, and published resolutions declaring that hereafter they will not give employment to any negro mechanic, or learn any negro boy a trade. They condemn the practice of masters letting slaves hire their own time. They refer to the influx of free negroes from Virginia, driven out by the laws of that State; and they express a determination to petition the Legislature of North Carolina to pass a similar act, or tax free negroes to raise a fund to send them to Africa. – North Carolinian.

Carolina Watchman, 15 August 1850.