Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Methodist

Services at Andrew Chapel.

CHURCH DIRECTORY.

RELIGIOUS SERVICES TO-MORROW.

Andrew Chapel, (colored.) –Services at 10 A.M. and 8 P.M., by the pastor, Rev. W.M. Walsh.

Newbern Daily Progress, 25 June 1859.

He stopped and labored among them.

Evans, Henry. – Founder of a Methodist Church in Fayetteville, N.C. About the close of the eighteenth century, Henry Evans, a free Negro from Virginia, on his way to Charleston, S.C., to practice the trade of shoe-making, chanced to stop at Fayetteville. He was a licensed local Methodist preacher. He was so impressed with the condition of the colored people that he decided to stop and labor among them. This he did, working at his trade during the week, and preaching on Sunday. The town council ordered him to stop preaching. The meetings were held in secret. At length, the white people became interested in the meetings and began to attend them, and a regular Methodist Church was established. Although a white minister was in the course of time sent to take charge of the congregation, Evans was not displaced. A room was built for him in the church, and there he remained till his death in 1810.

Monroe N. Work, Negro Year Book and Annual Encyclopedia of the Negro (1912).