Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: marriage to enslaved person

His papers have never been seen.

ts-5-15-1852

Tarborough Southerner, 15 May 1852.

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NOTICE.

$10 Reward.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, on the 1st day of April, 1852, a mulatto fellow named Jerry Manly, as he calls himself, and says that he is a free man, but his papers have never been seen. Said boy is 30 or 32 years old, and has a free woman for his wife — the woman is well known by the name of Nancy Reed, she has a sister in the neighborhood for Tarboro’, and Logsboro’, and no doubt they are lurking in that vicinity. The boy was raised in the town of Louisburg, N.C., and has a mother and several brothers in that place. The above reward will be paid for his delivery to the undersigned at Rocky Mount, or any jail so that I can get him again.  S.D. Armstrong.

Rocky Mount, April 3rd, 1852.

In the 1850 census of Nash County: Nancy Reed, 32, with Betsey, 16, Mary, 6, and William Reed, 7 months, plus Matilda Cross, 29, all mulatto.

Did unlawfully live as man and wife.

State of North Carolina, Wilson County to wit:

Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions January Term AD 1859

The Jurors for the State on their oath present that Benjamin Price a free negro late of the County of Wilson on the 1st day of December AD 1858 and divers other days and times both before and after that day at and in the county aforesaid did unlawfully cohabit & live as man & wife with Easter a slave the property of Dempsey Barnes contrary to the form of the statute in such cases made & provided and against the peace & dignity of the state.    /s/ B.B. Barnes Sol

[Reverse: State vs Ben Price A Slave for Wife / Gov Pros Wit Dempsey Barnes  / Not a true Bill W.E.J. Shallington For’n Grand Jury]

Miscellaneous Records, Wilson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

Poet and minister’s father.

“Islay Walden, black poet and Congregational minister, was born in Randolph County, the son of a slave named Ruth belonging to James Gardner. At Gardner’s death in 1843 Ruth and her two children were sold to Dolphin Gardner. Islay was at that time a babe in arms while his sister, Sarah, was two. How many times he was sold after that is unknown. His father was William D. Walden, a free black who was highly respected in his community. …”

— From http://ncpedia.org/biography/walden-islay

Presentments.

Rowan County Sup’r Ct. March Term 1842

The Grand Jury present Elija Volentine a free man of colour for intermarrying & cohabiting with Nancy a slave of Sarah Brown. Witnesses Sarah Brown & Geo. Brown.

Also Susan Volentine a free woman of colour for intermarrying and conhabiting with Isaac a man slave of Wm. Thomason. Witnesses James Owens & Sam’l Marlin

Also Betsey Hollis a free woman of colour for intermarrying & cohabiting with Angus a man Slave the property of the late Nancy McCorkle Dec’d, Witnesses Jacob Correll & John C. Miller

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Rowan County Sup’r Ct. March Term 1842

The Grand Jury present Eliza Volentine a free woman of colour for intermarrying & cohabiting with Dennis a man slave the property of Jacob Krider. Witnesses William Gray & Andrew Gray.

Also Ruth Hostler a free wom of colour for intermarrying and cohabiting with Jack a man Slave the property of John Kerr, Witnesses John Johnston & John Kerr.

Also Edward Volentine a free man of colour for intermarrying & cohabiting with Jude a woman slave the property of Hezekiah Turner, Witnesses John Foard & Robert Bradshaw.

….

Records of Slaves and Persons of Color, Miscellaneous Records, Rowan County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

In the 185o census, School District 36, Rowan County: Elijah Valentine, 35, mulatto, in the household of white farmer Alexander Brown, 44.

In the 1850 census, Salisbury, Rowan County: Susan Valentine, 65, black, with Camer, 47, and Rachel Valentine, 45, washerwomen. 

In the 1850 census, School District 6, Rowan County: Ruth Hosler, 50, mulatto, in the household of Jane G. Kerr, white.

She might have gone off with him.

$10 Reward.

RANAWAY from the Subscriber, about the 15th ult. a negro woman named HANNAH; formerly the property of Col. Edward Williams, of Onslow County, but more recently owned by Richard Saunders, Esq. Hannah is above the ordinary size, black complexion – about Forty years of age. – She has relations in Onslow county and at Rocky Point.

She has, for some years past, been living with a free colored man named Isaac Scott, who has left this place, and she might have gone off with him.

I will give the above reward for her apprehension, upon delivery to me at Wilmington, or confinement in any jail, so that I may recover her. ANN GUTHRIE. Wilmington, Sept. 11th, 1835.

Wilmington People’s Press and Advertiser, 25 September 1835.

A settlement about his wife and children.

Witness: Love McDaniel

On the 30th March 1860 I was in Goldsboro with Henry Simmons. I accompanied by Simmons called upon William B. Fields for Simmons and told him that Henry Simmons had come there to have a settlement with him about his Wife & children according to their bargain & that he Simmons had the money to pay up what he owed him, when he told me to mind my own business & then left me. This was on Friday night. On the next day upon some information received by me myself & Henry Simmons attended at the Office of Wm T Dortch in Company with George B Strong Attorney for Simmons. This meeting was for the Purpose of a Compromise but we could not do so. Fields presenting and account which was Considered on the Part of those acting for Simmons as extravagant & outrageous for the Keeping of Jenny & her children making his claim to amount of $2300,00 The account being objected to he Fields offered to take $2200.00 and refusing to take anything less. Simmons through his attorney Mr Strong offered to Pay Fields $1800.00 which he refused to take. Mr. Strong then offered to Pay $1900.00 in Cash & the amount of Simmons account against Fields in addition on One part of Simmons stating that had the money and offered to pay it & I know the fact that he had the money present at the time. This Fields refused and swore that would not take less than $2200.00. I had no interest in the negroes except to befriend Simmons and had no secret understanding with him that I was to own the negroes nor did I then nor do I now desire to own any of them. I know Henry Simmons to be a good Carpenter having employed him to build a house for me and employed him at the recommendation of Wm B Fields who said he was a smart good Workman. Simmons was in my empoyment at teh time I went to Goldsboro & went at his request to take charge of his money & have a proper settlement made with Fields for the negroes. 

Cross Examined by Defendant

Did you hear Simmons admit in a conversation in Mr Dortch’s office that he had taken back from Mr Fields one hundred Dollars in small notes which were insolvent for which he had given Fields in Part Payment

Answer — I have no distinct recollection about it.  Question 2 — Was any money exhibited to Fields in this conbversation of which you speak in your examination in chief.  Answer Mr. Strong had it in his pocket & put his hand & his breast pocket & told Fields the money was there for him but did not show it. I know that Strong had it in his pocket. The money was Bank Rolls on different banks in ther State.    /s/ Love McDaniel

Sworn & Subscribed  W.A. Haskin(?) Clk & Mast

This affidavit was filed in support of the plaintiff in the bill of complaint of Henry Simmons, a free man of color of Cumberland County, against William B. Fields of Wayne County alleging that Fields had purchased for $1500 from the estate of L. Dortch slaves Jenny and her children Jane, Mary and Charles, who were Simmons’ wife and children. Fields allegedly agreed to convey the slaves to Simmons when Simmons repaid the purchase money, plus interest, but refused to turn them over when Simmons presented his cash. Documents in the file of Records of Slaves and Free Persons of Color, Wayne County Records, North Carolina State Archives. 

Their eyes have been injured.

Ten Dollars Reward.

RAN AWAY from the subscriber on the 8th inst, my negro man MINGO, aged about 45 years, of ordinary size, rather dark complexion, a white streak near the sight of one of his eyes, (which eye is not recollected) has rather a bad look out of his eyes. It is supposed that he is lurking about the lower edge of Edgecombe, or the upper part of Pitt, or he may have got as low down as Washington, Beaufort county, as his wife is a free woman of color, named Julia Read, lately of Pitt and has relations in Beaufort. The eyes of both him and her have been injured, his by a splinter and hers by a burn. The above reward will be given for the apprehension of Mingo, if delivered to me near Tradesville, in Edgecombe county, or if secured in any jail so that I get him again. All persons are forbid harboring, employing, or carrying off said negro under penalty of the law. MATTHEW WHITEHEAD. Nov 15, 1843

Tarboro’ Press, 10 February 1844.

Barnes, or Burns, or Copage, or Farmer.

$125 REWARD

will be paid for the delivery of the said HARRY to me at Tossnot Depot, Edgecombe county, or for his confinement in any Jail in the State so that I can get home, or One Hundred and Fifty Dollars will be given for his head.

He was lately heard from in New-Bern where he called himself Henry Barnes (or Burns), and will likely continue the same name, or assume that of Copage or Farmer. He has a free mulatto woman for a wife, by the name of Sally Bozeman, who has lately removed to Wilmington, and lives in that part of the town called Texas, where he will likely be lurking.

Master of vessels are particularly cautioned against harboring, employing, or concealing the said negro on board their vessels, as the full penalty of the law will be rigorously enforced. GUILFORD HORN.   June 29th, 1850

Eastern Carolina Republican (New Bern), 20 November 1850.