Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Goings

He has gone by a false name.

WAS TAKEN UP and committed to the Jail of Craven Co., a mulatto man by the name of Clinton Oxendine, and is of the medium size and height. Said man says, since he was put in Jail, that he was gone by a false name, but says he is a free negro and that his name is Jacob Goings, and was sold several years ago for cost in Cumberland county, and John Wright became the purchaser for five years, and afterwards the said Wright sold him to Littleton Gunn of Roberson county. The owner is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges and take him away or he will be dealt with as the law directs. A.C. LATHAM, Sheriff. By W.S. BALLENGER, D. Sheriff. Jan. 1, 1862

Newbern Daily Progress, 21 January 1862.

Twenty for the man, ten for the broken-down horse.

$30 REWARD.

Horse and Money Stolen.

STOLEN from the subscriber, on Thursday night the 26th Feb’y, a BRIGHT CLAY BANK HORSE, with a white blaze in the face, low in flesh and limps a little in the right hind leg, has a sore back. He was taken by a free negro by the name of Jacob Goings alias Morgan. There was a free girl with him by the name of Sara Jane Goings.

I will give a reward of Twenty Dollars for the arrest and confinement of Jacob Goings in Lumberton Jail, or ten in any other Jail in the State, and ten dollars for the return of the horse to me. DUGALD McDUGALD. Dondarroch, Robeson Co. – Feb’y 18, 1863.

Fayetteville Semi-Weekly Observer, 16 March 1863.

He abused and abandoned her.

State of North Carolina, Guilford County    }   Superior Court of Law In Fall Term 1866

To the Honorable the Judge of said County

Zilpha Ann Goings of the county and state aforesaid by her petition respectfully showeth unto your Honor, that she was born free, that she intermarried in the county of Alamance on 7th of August 1858 with one Barrister Goings, a free man of color, that the said Barrister obtained a license from the clerk of the County Court for said County of Alamance, and the rites of matrimony were solemnized between them by a Justice of the Peace according to Law that the said Barrister lived [with] her about eighteen months, that for the first three months their life was peaceful and happy, that about that time, for some reason unknown to your Petitioner but wholly without Just cause, the said Barrister became Jealous of her, and began to curse, whip, illtreat, and threaten your Petitioner, that this course of conduct was kept up until some time in June 1860, when the said Barrister without cause and against the will of your Petitioner, left her and went to the county of Chatham, that in the autumn of that year, he returned to her, staid three weeks, quarreled with her, abused her threatened to take her life and again abandoned her, that she strove to make him happy and induce him to live with her, but it was all in vain, that he hath never returned to her house since that time, and has wholly and cruelly abandoned her, that he hath never since then helped her, in furnishing her in any thing to subsist, or paid any the least attention to her, whatever, that she is advised and believes that he has led a lewd life, since he quited her, that she is informed and believes, that he after leaving her, visited one Ruth Bass, a free woman of color, had illicit intercourse with her, and that afterwards the said Ruth was delivered [page missing] ly him, that she good reasons to believe and does believe that he has had illicit and adulterous intercourse with persons to her unknown, in the county of Chatham where he lived for some time after he left her, that she has not heard of him for about  two years, and does not know now where he lives, or in what manner he is conducting himself, that she has resided in Guilford county over seven years, that the course of action has existed for nearly eight years, that she hath born herself, as a wife should, hath observed her vows, of chasity and fidelity, and regretted no little that she could not induce her husband to continue with her, and observe his own vows of chastity and fidelity, help her to make a livelyhood, and lead with her a correct and upright life, that she hath never given him any cause for the course he has since stronly pursured, your Petitioner therefore prays your Honor that she may be dissolved from the bonds of matrimony with her said husband, the said Barrister Goings, and for further and such other relief, as the nature of her case may require and to your Honor may seem meet. May it please your Honor to grant unto her [illegible] writ of supoena directed to the said Barrister Goings, commanding him to appear at the next Term of the Superior Court of Law to be held for the county of Guilford at the Court in Greensboro on 4th Monday after 4th Monday in September 1866 then and there to plead, or answer the Libel of your Petitioner and stand to, abide by, and perform such orders and Judgments as shall lie made in this case, And as in duty bound will pray     Scott & Scott Atty

Divorce Records, Guilford County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

In the 1850 census of Southern Division: Barister Goans, 13, in the household of William Workman, 32. In the 1860 census of Eastern Division, Chatham County: Barrister Goings, 30, and Emeline Goings, 28.  In the 1870 census of Pittsboro Road North Side, Chatham County: Barrister Goens, 40, wife Nancy, 35, and children John, 11, George, 7, and Nathan, 5.

In the 1860 census of Alamance County: Stephen Bass, 60, with Ruth, 16, Sarah, 12, Jonathan, 10, and Eliza Bass, 6, and Maria, 23, M.J., 6, and John Dunnan, 2.

Colored!! Did he enlist?!!!

SOLDIER’S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF HALIFAX  }

On this 3rd day of July, A.D. 1909, personally appeared before me S.M. Gary, C.S.C. in and for the State and County aforesaid, Hilliard Gowen, age 73 years, and a resident at Littleton post-office, in said County and State, and who, being duly sworn, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the pension under the provisions of an act entitled “An act for the relief of certain Confederate Soldiers, Sailors and Widows,” ratified March 8, 1907; that he is the identical Hilliard Gowen who enlisted in Co. A, 14 Reg., N.C. State Troops, on or about the 15th day of Jany, 1862, to serve in the armies of the late Confederate States, and that while in service at Gettysburg in the State of Pa., on or about [blank] day of April, 1863, he received a wound or wounds, etc. [description] Shot in the ankle.

He further states:

That he is, and has been for twelve months immediately preceding this Application for Pension, a bona fide resident of North Carolina; that he holds no office under the United States, or any State or County, from which he is receiving the sum of three hundred dollars as fees or as salary annually; that he is not worth in his own right, or the right of his wife, property at its assessed value for taxation to the amount of five hundred dollars ($500), or has he disposed of property of such value by gift or voluntary conveyance since the 11th of March, 1885; and that he is not receiving any aid from the State of North Carolina or under any other statue providing for the relief of the maimed and blind soldiers of the State.   /s/ Hilliard Goins

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 3rd day of July, 1909.  /s/ W.E. Spruill, N.P.

Also personally appeared before me J.F. Newsom, who resides at Littleton post-office, in said County and State, a person whom I know to be respectable and entitled to credit, and being by me duly sworn, says he acquainted with Hilliard Gowen, the applicant for pension, and has every reason to believe that he is the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the facts set forth in this affidavit are correct to the best of his knowledge and belief, and that he has no interest, direct or indirect, in this claim. /s/ J.F. Newsom

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 3rd day of July, 1909.  /s/ W.E. Spruill, N.P.

Also personally appeared before me [blank] a physician in good standing in said County and State and being duly sworn, says that he has carefully and thoroughly examined [blank], the applicant for pension, and finds such disability for manual labor as described below, by reason of wounds received while in the discharge of his duty as a soldier or sailor of North Carolina in the service of the late Confederate States. Applicant has an old gunshot wound of ankle. His disability does not amount to 3/4   /s/ Willis Alston, Signature of Physician.

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this 10th day of July, 1909.  /s/ W.E. Spruill, N.P.

—–

[Handwritten] “Colored!!  Did he enlist?!!!” [Stamped] APPROVED FOURTH CLASS

File of Hilliard Goins, North Carolina Confederate Soldiers and Widows Pension Applications 1885-1953, http://FamilySearch.org. Original, North Carolina State Archives.

In the 1860 census of Western District, Halifax County: Jerry Going, 57, farmer; wife Louvenia, 50; children Caroline, 20, Anderson, 15, Hilliard, 16, Henry, 13, Samuel, 12, Emma, 12, Safronia, 11, James, 10, Margarett, 9, Jeremiah, 8, and Louann Going, 3; plus, Joshua Monford, 31, farmhand.

William Goyens.

William Goyens (or Goings), early Nacogdoches settler and businessman, was born in Moore County, North Carolina, in 1794, the son of free mulatto William Goings and a white woman. He came to Texas in 1820 and lived at Nacogdoches for the rest of his life. Although he could not write much beyond his signature, he was a good businessman. He was a blacksmith and wagonmaker and engaged in hauling freight from Natchitoches, Louisiana. On a trip to Louisiana in 1826, he was seized by William English, who sought to sell him into slavery. In return for his liberty, Goyens was induced to deliver to English his slave woman and to sign a note agreeing to peonage for himself, though reserving the right to trade on his own behalf. After his return to Nacogdoches, he successfully filed suit for annulment of these obligations.

During the Mexican Texas era, Goyens often served as conciliator in the settlement of lawsuits under the Mexican laws. He was appointed as agent to deal with the Cherokees, and on numerous occasions he negotiated treaties with the Comanches and other Indians. He also operated an inn near the site of what is now the courthouse in Nacogdoches. In 1832, he married Mary Pate Sibley, who was white. Sibley had one son, Henry Sibley, from a former marriage, but Goyens and Mary had no children together.

During the Texas Revolution, Goyens was interpreter for Gen. Sam Houston and his party in negotiations for a treaty with the Cherokee. After the revolution he purchased what was afterwards known as Goyens’ Hill, four miles west of Nacogdoches. He built a large two-story mansion with a sawmill and gristmill west of his home on Moral Creek, where he and his wife lived until their deaths. During his later life Goyens amassed considerable wealth in real estate, despite constant efforts by his white neighbors to take it away. He always employed the best lawyers in Nacogdoches, including Thomas J. Rusk and Charles S. Taylor, to defend him and was generally successful in his litigation. He died on June 20, 1856, soon after the death of his wife; they were both buried in a cemetery near the junction of Aylitos Creek with the Moral. At his grave a marker was erected by the Texas Centennial Commission in 1936. Many traditions grew up in Nacogdoches about this unusual man, and sometimes it is hard to tell just what is true and what is tradition.

Adapted from Texas State Historical Association, tshaonline.org