Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: enslaved persons

His half-brother — and owner — are free men of color.

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the Subscriber, on the 19th inst., a Negro man named LUKE, about five feet six or eight inches high, dark complected, has a scar on the side of one of his eyes, (which one not recollected, but believed to be the right eye,) stout built, weighs about 175 or 180 pounds.

He was purchased in 1846 from Mr. Josiah E. Bryan of this town. He has relatives in the County of Sampson, among them a half-brother named Sam Boon, — a free man of color, — and may possibly be lurking in that neighborhood, as I am informed he was seen about there a short time since. Possibly he may have obtained free papers, and is endevouring to escape to a free State, as I understand some free persons of color removed from Sampson county last week to Indiana.

A reward of Ten Dollars will be given for his apprehension and delivery to me, if taken in this county; Fifteen Dollars if taken in any other county in this State and lodged in a safe Jail; or Fifty Dollars if taken out of state — so that I get him again.  M.N. LEARY.

Fayetteville, March 29, 1853.

Fayetteville Observer, 7 April 1853.

 

She might have gone off with him.

$10 Reward.

RANAWAY from the Subscriber, about the 15th ult. a negro woman named HANNAH; formerly the property of Col. Edward Williams, of Onslow County, but more recently owned by Richard Saunders, Esq. Hannah is above the ordinary size, black complexion – about Forty years of age. – She has relations in Onslow county and at Rocky Point.

She has, for some years past, been living with a free colored man named Isaac Scott, who has left this place, and she might have gone off with him.

I will give the above reward for her apprehension, upon delivery to me at Wilmington, or confinement in any jail, so that I may recover her. ANN GUTHRIE. Wilmington, Sept. 11th, 1835.

Wilmington People’s Press and Advertiser, 25 September 1835.

Interesting cases.

STOKES COUNTY COURT.

… On Wednesday there was a case which excited considerable interest, the case of the State vs. Enoch Going. The State was represented by Mr. Solicitor Masten, and Going was defended by J.R. McLean and A.H. Joyce, Esquires. This was an indictment against the said defendant, who was charged in the bill as being a free negro, for migrating into this State from Virginia, contrary to our Act of Assembly. The defendant, through his counsel, denied that he is a free negro, and alleged that he is of Indian extraction. The Jury, on the testimony before them, acquitted him.

On the same day, Rowan Stewart and Harston Stewart, free negroes and brothers, were arraigned on a charge of having gambled with a slave, Calvin, the property of Alexander Martin. The State was assisted by J.R. McLean, Esq., and Mr. Morehead appeared for the defendants. The testimony showed that the free negroes and slaves played at a game of cards on the Sabbath day and directly on the side of a public road; that the three had liquor and were drinking; and that, after they were discovered by the witness, much abusive language passed between them, and that this ended in a fight. It was an aggravated case. The defendants submitted to a verdict of guilty and endeavored to beg; but the court, and very properly too, sentenced them to thirty-nine lashes each, a fine of $20 a piece,and to be hired out for the cost and fines, if not secured. These, however, were secured.

The Greensboro Times, 24 March 1860.

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In the 1850 census of Stokes County, Harston Stewart, 15, in the household of white farmer Hugh Martin.