Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: Confederacy

Smith goes above and beyond.

Felix Smith, a free man of color of this County, generously stepped forward and contributed Twenty dollars towards equipping and uniforming the Yanceyville Grays, at a late meeting held for that purpose. It was suggested that Smith was too liberal for his means, but he insisted that the whole amoung should be taken, and was willing to give more and fight for Southern rights too, if necessary.  Most of the free people of color in the Southern States are acting with a patriotic loyalty that some of the whites would do to imitate. With regard to the slaves we could raise several companies in Caswell who would esteem it a pleasure to fight old Abe and his minions to the death. Our Cook would whip him out of his shirt and then hang him for a dog as high as his brother old John Brown danced in the air. We’ll stand a wager that she can lick Abe and Scott thrown in, in a fair fight.

The Milton Chronicle, 24 May 1861.

In the 1850 census of Caswell County: Mary Coile, 102, white; Felix Smith, 38, black, farm laborer, born in Caswell County.

In payment of Confederate taxes, no. 3.

Form of the estimate and assessment of agricultural products agreed upon by the assessor and tax-payer, and the value of the portion thereof to which the government is entitled, which is taxed in kind, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11 of “an Act to lay taxes for the common defence and carry on the government of the Confederate States,” said estimate and assessment to be made as soon as the crops are ready for market.

Mathew Aldridge

Cured Fodder     Quantity of gross crop. — 1000    Tithe or one-tenth. – 100    Value of one-tenth. — $3.00 

I, Mathew Aldridge of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina do swear that the above is a true statement and estimate of all the agricultural products produced by me during the year 1863, which are taxable by the provisions of the 11th section of the above stated act, including what may have been sold of consumed by me, and of the value of that portion of said crops to which the government is entitled.   /s/ Mathew X Aldridge

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the 3 day of December 1863, and I further certify that the above estimate and assessment has been agreed upon by said Mathew Aldridge and myself as a correct and true statement of the amount of his crops and the value of the portion to which the government is entitled.  /s/ J.A. Lane, Assessor.

Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, National Archives and Records Administration.

The Armwoods get certified and paid.

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During the Civil War, free men of color were conscripted to build breastworks on North Carolina’s southern coast. After filing claims, the Armwoods were paid for their two weeks of service — minus the cost of a furnished blanket.

In the 1850 census of Southern District, Sampson County: John Armwood, 50, laborer; Susan, 30; Henderson, 25; Louisa, 20; Henry, 16; Richard, 15; and John Armwood, 13. In the Northern District: James Winn, 33; Buckner L.Bryan, 14; Zachariah Bryan, 13; and Owen Armwood, 24.

Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, National Archives and Record Administration.