Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Category: Apprentices

Runaway bound boy, no. 15.

Five Cents Reward.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, a few weeks since, an indented Apprentice by the name of EPHRAIM BURNETT; he is a dark complected colored boy, 15 to 16 years of age. Whoever will apprehend and deliver the said Boy to me in Fayetteville, shall be entitled to the above reward, but no thanks or charges. All persons are forbid harboring or employing him in any manner whatever.  JAMES BAKER. September 8, 1834.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 23 December 1834.

Runaway bound boy, no. 14.

FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the Subscriber on the 17th of October last, a colored Boy named THOMAS WALDEN, about eight years old. I understand said boy is about Donald Street’s, in Moore county. I will give the above reward for his delivery to me at Emerson’s Tan Yard, Chatham county. Said boy was bound to me by the County Court, I therefore forewarn all persons from harboring him, as I intend to enforce the law against the aggressor.  DANIEL CAMPBELL.  October 23rd, 1841.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 3 November 1841.

Runaway bound boy, no. 13.

RUNAWAY

From the Subscriber on the 5th inst., an indentured colored boy named JIM WESLEY, about 15 years old. He is a bright mulatto, and has a downcast look when spoken to. Persons are cautioned against harboring or employing him. Anyone arresting the boy and returning him to me at Fayetteville will be liberally rewarded.   DAVID McDUFFIE. July 28th, 1855.

The North-Carolinian (Fayetteville), 4 August 1855.

Runaway bound boy, no. 12.

RANAWAY

FROM me, in October last, HENRY MARTIN, a free boy of color, about 18 years of age. The said Martin is a bound apprentice to me. All persons are hereby forbid harboring or trusting him on my account. Any person so doing will be prosecuted to the extent of the law. J.G. SMITH Fayetteville, Dec’r 6, 1856.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 8 December 1856.

Runaway bound boy, no. 11.

TWENTY SHILLINGS REWARD.

Run away last night, from the subscriber, an apprenticed negro boy, named Bill, known generally as Bill Copper, a light mulatto about 14 years of age. Any person taking up said boy, and sending him to me at Roanoke-island by any vessel bound there, shall receive the above reward, and all reasonable expences. HENRY KENNEDY. Edenton, June 4, 1794.

The State Gazette of North-Carolina (New Bern), 6 June 1794.

Runaway bound boy, no. 10.

Carolina_Watchman_27_Feb_1851_Bound_boy

Carolina Watchman (Salisbury), 27 February 1851.

No thanks.

FIVE CENTS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the subscriber on the 15th February last, a free negro girl named EDNY MANOR, an indented apprentice. She is tall, of light complexion and about 16 years of age. All persons are hereby warned not to harbor or employ said girl, under the penalty of the law. The above reward will be given and no thanks, to any person who will apprehend and deliver her to me. E. FERGUSON. Newbern, March 7th, 1848.

The Newbernian and North Carolina Advocate, 21 March 1848.

I received no bounty.

 

Wm Conner

 

In the 1850 census of Greene County, Lemmon Lyntch, 32 year-old white farmer, and William Conner, 18 year-old mulatto. William was likely an apprentice.

In the 1860 census of Hookerton, Greene County, William Conner, 28, and Argent Conner, 50, both mulatto. 

2 Cav. U.S.C.T. William Conner. Co. A, 2 Reg’t. U.S.C.T. Cav. appears on Company Descriptive Book of the organization named above. Description: age, 33 years; height, 5 feet 8 inches; complexion, tawny; eyes, dark; hair, black; where born, Green County, NC. Enlistment: when, 22 Dec 1863; where, Newberne; by whom: Capt. Hourd; term, 3 years. Remarks: Promoted to Company Farrior 1 Nov 1864.

——

Image of letter to Freedmen’s Bureau supplied by Conner’s descendant, Trisha Blount Hewitt, whom I thank for bringing Conner to my attention. [Sidenote: According to Hewitt, Conner initially served as a “laundress” in Co. A, 3rd N.C. Infantry, Confederate Army.]

Duplin County Apprentices, 1853-54.

At January Term 1853, Sarah Rouse was bound to John D. Abernethy.

At October Term 1853, Matilda Rouse, age 10, was bound to John B. Hussey, and James C. Burnett, age 5, and Caleb W. Burnett, age 3, were bound to William M. Bowden.

At January Term 1854, Betsey Rouse, age 4, and Mary Rouse, age 3, were bound to Calvin Jernigan.

At October Term 1854, Mary S. Aldridge, “mulatto girl,” was bound to John W. Chambers.

In the 1850 census of Duplin County, in the household of white farmer James Maxwell, Matilda, 7, and Sarah Rouse, 5, both mulatto. Nearby, Eliza Rouse, 27, and son Samuel, 1, both mulatto, in the household of white farmer James Tucker.

In the 1850 census, North Side of the Neuse, Wayne County: Mary, 48, Sarah, 26, Mary, 4, James, 2, Charles, 20, Churchill, 22, and William Burnett, 24.

Minutes, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Court Records, Duplin County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

Made good.

“Colter’s entire life has consisted of challenges accepted and made good on. He was born on January 8, 1910, in Noblesville, Indiana, a small farming town about forty miles east of Indianapolis. On both side of the family his ancestors were free blacks who had settled in Indiana several years before the Civil War. Colter possesses a ledger tracing his mother’s family back to Britton Bassett, the son of a black man and a white woman in North Carolina, who was granted his freedom in 1797 when he was twenty-one and given a horse, bridle and saddle, and one hundred dollars. In the 1830s Bassett moved his wife and children to Indiana, traveling by night and hiding by day in order to elude slave hunters.”

— from the introduction to Cyrus Colter‘s The Rivers of Eros (1991).

[Sidenote: Britton Bassett, as the son of a white woman, was born free, not set free. Perhaps 1797 marked the end of his involuntary apprenticeship. He had a son Britton, who also had a son Britton and another named Daniel. Britton and Daniel married daughters of Montreville and Anna J. Henderson Simmons, who were born free in North Carolina and migrated to Indiana by way of Ontario, Canada.]