Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Skipped bail.

$10 REWARD.

The above Reward of TEN DOLLARS will be given for the apprehending of

ERVIN ROBESON,

A free man of colour, was committed to the Jail of Moore County on a charge of petty Larceny. Being desirous of giving Bail has indentured himself to me for a term of years, to become his bail. The said Ervin has absconded himself from my employment. Ervin is about 22 years of age, 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, tolerable bright mulatto, had on when he left, homespun coat and sattinett pantaloons and an old cloak. It is supposed he will aim for Anson county, where he was raised, or to Randolph county, where his wife’s people reside. Any person apprehending said Ervin and confining him in any Jail so that I get him again, will be entitled to the above reward, and all reasonable charges paid. All persons are forewarned from harboring or employing said Ervin.  A. MUNROE.  Caledonia, Moore Co., March 8th, 1833.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 2 April 1833.

The house was small.

FIRES.

On Saturday afternoon, the house of Washington Bowditch, a very worthy free colored man, in the south part of the town, was destroyed by fire. The house was small.

Tri-Weekly Commercial (Wilmington), 8 March 1853.

A caution against his kinsman, too.

FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the subscriber on the 20th inst., a bound Mulatto Boy by the name of JOHN TERRY. Said boy is about 14 years of age, and is supposed to be lurking about the neighborhood of a Mr. Council in Bladen county. I will give the above reward of Five Dollars for the delivery of said boy to me at this place. All persons are hereby notified not to harbor or employ the boy, as I am determined to enforce the law against anyone doing so. And I would further caution the public against a free colored man by the name of Newsom L. Terry, as he is a dangerous fellow, and I have no doubt that John was induced to leave my premises by his advice.  J.W. POWERS. Fayetteville, Jan. 24, 1851.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 4 February 1851.