Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

He has gone by a false name.

WAS TAKEN UP and committed to the Jail of Craven Co., a mulatto man by the name of Clinton Oxendine, and is of the medium size and height. Said man says, since he was put in Jail, that he was gone by a false name, but says he is a free negro and that his name is Jacob Goings, and was sold several years ago for cost in Cumberland county, and John Wright became the purchaser for five years, and afterwards the said Wright sold him to Littleton Gunn of Roberson county. The owner is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges and take him away or he will be dealt with as the law directs. A.C. LATHAM, Sheriff. By W.S. BALLENGER, D. Sheriff. Jan. 1, 1862

Newbern Daily Progress, 21 January 1862.

Intemperance and exposure.

Coroner’s Inquest.

On Sunday, 16th inst., a jury of inquest was held upon the dead body of Caroline Alfonzo, a free colored woman: the evidence proved her to be a drudge laborer about town. At her will, she was the wife of Ned, a superannuated slave, formerly the property of John W. Guion, dec’d. On Saturday, the 15th inst., at 3 o’clock, P.M., she parted company with Ned in good health and went to the house of Mrs. Emily Jane Fulford to fulfill an engagement with her. She left Mrs. Fulford’s about 1 ½ hours before night-fall, and took with her a tray of plates containing sausages and pigs feet to sell for Mrs. Fulford – she was under the influence of liquor at the time, — she did not return to her husband nor her employer as was her custom to do. Sunday morning Caroline was found dead in the road leading to Pembrook near the South-West part of the town: on examination there was traces of blood from where she lay to a ditch about thirty yards distant; a smooth deep cut on her right cheek was the only mark of violence found on the body. By request of the Jury, Dr. R.S. Primrose examined the wound and pronounced it insufficient to produce death and stated that it might have been the result of accident. The clothes of the deceased were wet and frozen; the ditch had water in it about 3 ½ feet deep, and showed that it had been recently disturbed; a tray, some crockery and plates, etc. lay near the body. In her pockets was ninety cents, in silver and copper coin, a snuff-box, &c.

Verdict of the Jury was: “The deceased came to her death by intemperance and exposure.”

Newbern Weekly Progress, 18 December 1860.

To leave Fayetteville as soon as I possibly can.

The_North_Carolinian_8_23_1851

The North Carolinian, 23 August 1851.

Despite his firm-toned notice, Lewis Levy does not seem to have left Fayetteville after all. Well after the publication of this ad, he bought land in town, and his 1876 Southern Claims Commission statement asserts that he lived three miles from Fayetteville and owned nearly 200 acres in Cumberland County.

 

Most Horrible Murder.

Fville_Weekly_Observer_3_8_1858

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 8 May 1858.