Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Impostors.

The Subscriber is a free colored man, and some persons a few days past stole his Pocket Book, containing his papers of freedom, signed by John Taylor, Clerk of the court of Orange county – should any colored person attempt to pass under the said papers, the public are hereby cautioned and warned to have them immediately arrested as impostors. MACKLIN REVELS. March, 22.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 3 April 1823.

Blame it on the grog shop!

Attempt to Murder. – On Monday evening last, the citizens of the heart of our town were alarmed by loud cries of Murder! On repairing to the spot, it was found that a coloured man named Ephraim Hammond, had been struck on the head with a brick, by which his skull was shockingly fractured. Suspicion having attached to two white men, named Frederick Jones and Allen Rowell, they were taken up, and after examination, fully committed for trial. There is little or no hope of Hammond’s surviving the injury.

It would be improper to detail any of the circumstances connected with this horrid affair, except to state, that it appears to have been produced by an occurrence on the same evening, at a gambling table at one of those sinks of iniquity, a Grog shop! kept by one of the prisoners, and in the same building recently occupied by Wm. M. Anderson, who, only six weeks ago, vacated it to take up his abode in Jail for the murder of Madison Allen.

When will our County Court do its duty towards the suppression of these nuisances? – Fayetteville Observer.

The People’s Press (Wilmington), 2 February 1838.

Carried off by a mulatto hauling corn.

Two Hundred Dollars Reward.

RANAWAY on the 18th September, my negro woman JENNY, aged about 28 years, abot 5 feet high, dark complexion, looks surly unless spoken to, at which time she is very pleasant. She ranaway sometime previous and was taken up in Robeson county, N. Carolina, in the neighborhood of Shoe Heel Depot, working about under the pretence of being free. She was carried off by one Lewis Oxendine, a mulatto who was hauling corn at that time, from my plantation. I will give the above reward for her delivery to me or in any Jail so that I get her. I will give one hundred dollars more for proof sufficient to convict any person of harboring her.

My address in Brownsville Post Office, Marlborough District, South Carolina. JOHN A. HODGES. Dec. 6, 1863.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 28 March 1864.