Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Surnames: Catawba County, 1850.

The following surnames are found in the 1860 census of Catawba County: BUMGARNER, CLODFELTER, KEESER, SETZER, SIMS, SMITH and VINA.

Being in a slow state of health.

In the Name God Amen

I Tamsey Gandy of the County Wayne and State of North Carolina being in slow State of Health but of Sound mind and memory blessed be god for the Same Calling to mind the certainty of death, I make & publish this my last will and Testament in manner and form following Viz I give and bequeath unto my Son Henderson Gandy my bed bedstead and necessary furniture, and Red chest and all my clothes and Spun Cotton. I leave the rest of my property to be Sold by my Executor and money arising there from I leave to my Son Anderson Gandy.

I leave my Worthy friend Robert Williams my Executor to this my last will and Testament revoaking all other Wills by me made. April 28th in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty two whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal    Tansey X Gandy

Signed sealed and published in the presence of William Lewis

The will was proved at May Term 1842. Recording Docket Book 8, p. 309. Office of Clerk of Superior Court, Wayne County Courthouse, Goldsboro.

Tamsey Gandy’s estate was sold on 15 August 1842 and brought in $41.33 ¼.  Purchasers included Theo. Seaberry and Offie Seaberry (probably the same man, Theophilus Seaberry), but were primarily white neighbors. Though she could not write (or, presumably, read), Tamsey’s estate included “1 Lot Books.” Recording Docket Book 8, p. 355-356. Office of Clerk of Superior Court, Wayne County Courthouse, Goldsboro.

Edward Gandy named his daughter Tamsey Gandy as a beneficiary in his 23 July 1823 will filed in Nash County. Will Book 1, page 291, Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Nash County Courthouse, Nashville. In 1809, the surname of Tamsey Whiddon and her siblings Griffin, Brinkley and Elizabeth was changed to Gandy, and they were “legitimated.” North Carolina General Assembly, 1809 Session Laws, Chapter CXXVIII, page 40.

Acts passed.

The following are the Titles of the Acts passed at the Session of the General Assembly of the State of North-Carolina, held at the city of Raleigh, on the 1st of November, 1795.

To emancipate a mulatto boy by the name of Gustavus Adolphus Johnston, in the county of Chowan; and also a mulatto girl by the name of Amy Philips, in the county of Brunswick.

North-Carolina Journal, Halifax, 12 December 1795.

 

Larter brothers, U.S. Colored Troops.

ImageImageJennings Larter and Alfred Larter were sons of Arthur and Mary Larter, who migrated from Surry County NC to Owen and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, in the early 1850s. The Twenty-eighth U. S. Colored Troops were recruited in Indiana. Six companies were organized at Indianapolis in April, 1864, and turned over to the United States as a battalion of the 28th U. S. Colored infantry.

Compiled Military Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers in the 26th through 30th Infantry Units, and the 29th Connecticut Infantry (Colored). National Archives and Records Administration.