Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

The free people of color would harbor him.

Twenty Dollars Reward.

Ran away from the subscriber in February last, a tall negro man by the name of WILLIS, about thirty-five years of age; he is rather slim built and thin visage; has a down look, speaks slow, and would be very easily confused if strictly interrogated. No particular marks recollected, by which he could be described. It is probable he has obtained a free pass by some means or other, and may be in the employment of some person under a pretence of being free. He has some relations on the Hickory Mountain, in this county; he was very intimate in the family of Peter Chavas (a free man of colour,) who has left this country, and is now living in or near the Hawfields, Orange county, and also with the Carters‘ free persons of colour, who now live in Guilford county; he also had some connexion with the Hathcocks, who ran away from Clintham, a year or two since, and are now living in Davidson county. I have good reason to believe the Hathcocks, Carters, or Chavas would harbour him, and render any assistance in their power. The above reward will be given to any person or persons who will apprehend and confine in Jail the said fellow, so that I get him again; and all other reasonable expenses paid, if delivered to me in Chatham county, on New-Hope.  THOS. BELL, Sen.  May 23, 1827

The North-Carolina Star (Raleigh), 21 June 1827.

Voluntary enslavement of herself and her son.

… Mr Alford presented a petition from Sally Scott, free woman of color, praying for the voluntary enslavement of herself and infant son to Sidney A. Henton. …

Charlotte Democrat, 2 December 1862.

Died from a blow to the leg.

We learn (says the Standard) that Ephraim Holmes, a free man of color, died in this place on Monday morning last, from injuries received, by a blow on his leg, given by John Mitchell a free negro who, we learn, is in Jail.

The North-Carolina Star (Raleigh), 21 January 1852.

Robertson perpetrates an outrage.

Terrible Affair . — One of our most worthy Citizens Fatally Wounded. — On Thursday night last, Messrs. Albert Hinton, James Penny, and Keith, three citizens of this County, who were acting as a patrol under the appointment of our Court, in the discharge of their duties, visited the plantation of Mr. B.K.S. Jones, about 10 miles from this city, where a negro wedding was in progress. On going into the kitchen where the negroes were assembled, Wm. Robertson, a free negro, who was sold out of the jail in this City some time last year for debt, assaulted Mr. Hinton with an axe, splitting his head open, and inflicting a wound upon him which it is feared will prove fatal. The same negro struck Mr. James Penny with a shovel and knocked him senseless to the ground. Mr. Keitch was also knocked down, but by whom it is not known. Messrs. Penny and Keitch soon recovered, but we are pained to learn there is but little hope for Mr. Hinton. Mr. H resides about 4 miles from this city, and is one of the most estimable men in the county. Our citizens are greatly incensed against the perpetrator of this outrage, and a large number of them joined Sheriff High yesterday morning, and went out in search of the diabolical fiend. The negro, Wm. Robertson, is described as very black, and about 6 feet in height. 

P.S. Since writing the above, we have learned that it is reported that Mr. Hinton died yesterday morning from his injuries. — Ral. Register.

Fayetteville Observer, 4 May 1857.

A more honest, straightforward old man never lived.

Old Abel Payne‘s house, on the corner of Moore and Orange streets, has been torn down. This house though small and old, was once the residence of Abel Payne, a free colored man, who years ago was held in high esteem by the citizens of our town. A more honest, straightforward old man never lived, and his influence for good among the colored people will long be remembered.

Fayetteville Observer, 11 June 1885.

Wearing and carrying.

State of North Carolina, Rowan County  }   Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions

The Jurors for the State on their oath present that Mack Rankin a free person of color late of said County in the County aforesaid on the 1st day of January AD 1858 and on divers days and times afterward and before the finding of this inquisition unlawfully and with force and arms did wear and carry about his person a pistol not having obtained a license therefor from the court of Pleas and quarter sessions of his County within one year next preceeding the time of the wearing and carrying thereof against the form of the statue in such case made and provided and against the peace and dignity of the State.  /s/ Robt. E. Love

Records of Slaves and People of Color, Miscellaneous Records, Rowan County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

They will no doubt make exertions to conceal him.

RUNAWAY from the subscriber on the 24th ult., a free colored boy named Josiah Price, an indented apprentice. He is almost 14 years of age, very dark mulatto, about 5 feet 2 or 3 inches high. It is believed he is lurking in the neighborhood of Gates Court House, where he has a grandmother, and two brother names Jim and Peter Price, who will no doubt make exertions to conceal him. I will give the above reward and pay all necessary expenses, to any person who will deliver him to me, or so confine him that I get him again.  LEM’L SKINNER. Chowan Co. Nov 9th 1831.

Edenton Gazette, 9 December 1831.

He gave this boy his pass.

$30 REWARD.

RANAWAY from the Subscribe, living in Orange County, N.C., on the 4th inst. a Negro man named SAM. He is about 30 or 32 year of age, about five ten inches in height, rather chunky made, no particular marks except a dimple or scar on the side of his under jaw, not recollected which side, occasioned by a rising from a tooth. He is, from all circumstances, trying to get to a free State or pass as a free man, by changing his name to JOHN HARRIS, as he has secured a pass in the above name from John Harris, a free man of colour. The pass was given to John Harris and his wife and child, and was signed by myself Jeff. Horner, J.P. The said Jno. Harris was living with the Subscriber, at the time he gave this boy Sam his pass. I will give the above Reward of Thirty Dollars for his apprehension and delivery, or confinement in any Jail so that I may get him again.  JEFF. HORNER.

June 13, 1839.

N.B. This Pass was dated the last of Sept., or the first of October, 1838, or thereabouts.

Raleigh Register, 10 August 1839.

Skipped bail.

$10 REWARD.

The above Reward of TEN DOLLARS will be given for the apprehending of

ERVIN ROBESON,

A free man of colour, was committed to the Jail of Moore County on a charge of petty Larceny. Being desirous of giving Bail has indentured himself to me for a term of years, to become his bail. The said Ervin has absconded himself from my employment. Ervin is about 22 years of age, 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, tolerable bright mulatto, had on when he left, homespun coat and sattinett pantaloons and an old cloak. It is supposed he will aim for Anson county, where he was raised, or to Randolph county, where his wife’s people reside. Any person apprehending said Ervin and confining him in any Jail so that I get him again, will be entitled to the above reward, and all reasonable charges paid. All persons are forewarned from harboring or employing said Ervin.  A. MUNROE.  Caledonia, Moore Co., March 8th, 1833.

Fayetteville Weekly Observer, 2 April 1833.

The house was small.

FIRES.

On Saturday afternoon, the house of Washington Bowditch, a very worthy free colored man, in the south part of the town, was destroyed by fire. The house was small.

Tri-Weekly Commercial (Wilmington), 8 March 1853.

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