Fourth Generation Inclusive

Historical Documents of Genealogical Interest to Researchers of North Carolina's Free People of Color

Tag: free women of color

Bills to allow them to enslave themselves.

… a bill to allow Leah White, a free negress, to enslave herself to Morris McDaniel of Jones County; … a bill for the relief of James Moore, a free negro – allows him to enslave himself; …

The Raleigh Register, 27 February 1861.

Harbored by a free negro woman.

A RUNAWAY SHOT. – A negro man, the property of Mr. Thomas Foust, of Alamance, was shot near this place on Saturday last. He ran away the 15th of May 1861, after threatening his master’s life, and he has been prowling about this neighborhood for some time, and was harbored, it appears, by a free negro woman named Jane Day, living a few miles from this place. Several slaves were in confidence with him, and they often met at Jane Day’s and gambled together, one of whom betrayed him. On Saturday last several gentlemen armed went out to capture him, but he refused to surrender, swore he would not be taken, and threatened to cut his way through if opposed. He had ascended to the top of the chimney, intending to make his egress from the house that way, and was told to stop, or he would be shot. One of the company aimed at his legs, but the negro stooped just at the time to make a leap, and the load lodged in his abdomen. He fell on the outside, and a large bowie knife which he had, fell inside of the chimney. He died in fifteen or twenty minutes. – Hils. Rec.

The North Carolina Argus, 30 January 1862.

Worthless wife.

RANAWAY, on Wednesday last, my wife Sally Conrod, a free woman of color, without any just cause. All persons are requested not to harbor said Sally, and are hereby forewarned from trusting her on my account, as I will not pay any debts she may contract. I can produce respectable recommendations as to industry and morality, & wish not to be clogged with the debts of my worthless wife. ABSALOM CONROD, of color. Greensboro, May 8th, 1841.

Greensboro Patriot, 11 May 1841.

She staggered, fell and died.

Coroner’s Inquest.

Coroner Jones held an inquest yesterday on the body of Mary Green, a free mulatto woman. The particulars of her death as we have heard are as follows: She, in company with another woman, started to Green’s Mill, about one mile from town, sometime during the middle of the day on Monday. Just before getting to the mill, Mary was observed to stagger and fall, apparently in a fit. Her companion ran for assistance, and when she returned found that she was dead. The verdict of the jury was in accordance with the above facts.

Wilmington Daily Herald, 27 July 1859.

Two cases of murder.

From the Halifax Advocate, Oct. 29.

Our Superior Court. — …

The next case taken up was that of a free man of color named Morgan. He was indicted for the murder of James Wiggins, a white man. The prisoner was defended by Messrs. Whitaker and Spruill. The testimony, in substance, was that the prisoner and the deceased, not long before the homicide, had a quarrel and that a few days thereafter, and before the homicide took place, the prisoner had been heard to make threats against the life of Wiggins, in the event of another dispute occurring between them; that soon after this the deceased, with three other men, went to the prisoner’s house in the night with a view of chastising him, and required him to open the door, he refused to do so, upon which the door after several attempts, was pushed open, and the deceased entered and as he did so the prisoner struck him with an axe burying the blade up to the helve in his bowels. The prisoner instantly fled and the deceased very soon died of his wound. After a lucid charge from Judge Donnell, the jury retired and in about ten minutes brought in a verdict of manslaughter.

The third case, was an indictment against Polly Carter alias Polly Harrison, a free woman of color, for the Murder of Nancy Combs, likewise a free woman of color. It appeared in evidence, that at the very moment when the deceased came in sight of the prisoner, the latter was listening to a conversation calculated to exasperate her against the former and immediately ran to her and struck her on the face. The deceased, who was a tall and athletic woman, and very far gone in pregnancy, threw the prisoner down with ease and while the parties were in this situation, a white man named _____ Hall came up and kicked the deceased violently in the side just above the hips. The parties were then separated, and soon afterwards the prisoner made another attempt to revive the fight. Upon this part of the case, there were direct contradictions among the witnesses. Some, and the greater number, affirmed that the person of the deceased was not touched, and others that she received a blow of some violence about the small part of her back. The deceased immediately complained of much pain in her side, and continued to linger in much distress for 6 or 7 days when she was delivered of a still born child, and did [sic]. In the opinon of the physicians who heard most of the testimony, the death was caused by the violence in the affray, and the prisoner was found guilty of woman slaughter, and imprisoned one month, and to pay the cost of the indictment. _____ Hall had fled from justice.

….

The North Carolina Star (Raleigh), 6 November 1834.

Attempting to sell a free woman.

From the Raleigh Register.

A man by the name of Raiford Watkins, of Johnston, was brought before Justice Thompson, in this City, on Monday, upon a charge of attempting to sell Phoebe Flowers, a Free woman of color. He was bound over, in the sum of $200, to make his appearance at the next term of Wake Superior Court, and, failing to give bond, was committed to jail, to await trial.

Tarboro’ Press, 21 September 1850.

To sell herself into slavery.

Mr. Cheek introduced a bill for the relief of Sythia Chavis, a free colored woman. (Allows her to sell herself into slavery.)

Weekly Raleigh Register, 19 December 1860.

No thanks.

FIVE CENTS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the subscriber on the 15th February last, a free negro girl named EDNY MANOR, an indented apprentice. She is tall, of light complexion and about 16 years of age. All persons are hereby warned not to harbor or employ said girl, under the penalty of the law. The above reward will be given and no thanks, to any person who will apprehend and deliver her to me. E. FERGUSON. Newbern, March 7th, 1848.

The Newbernian and North Carolina Advocate, 21 March 1848.

She has actually performed some surprising cures.

To the worshipfull Court of Perquimans

we the Subscribers pray your worships that Negro Phillises freedom may be Established for Merritorious Services by the Court

She first being Purchased by her Husband Doctor Tom & actually paid for also being verry Serviceable in the neighbourhood both as a Midwife and Doctress & has acktually Performed Some Surpriseing Cures, & we your Petitioners as in Dutty Bound Shall Ever pray Feb’ry 1797

/s/ Fra’s Newby, Jas. Summer, Robert Whedbee, Joab Kinyon, John Miller, William Barclift, Joseph Perisher, Seth Whidbee, Sam’l Whidbee, Geo. Sutton, Tho’s Whedbee, Wm. Whidbee.

Slave Records, Pasquotank County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

He ill-treated, whipped and abused her, then took up with a slave.

North Carolina, Guilford County    }   Superior Court of Law, To Fall Term, A.D. 1866.

To the Honorable, the Judges of the said Court:

Mary Hubbard, of said County, by her petitioner, respectfully showeth unto your Honor, that she was born free and was intermarried, about twelve years ago, with a free man of color of the name of John Hubbard; that they obtained a license from the Clerk of the County Court of Alamance County and the rites of matrimony were solemnized between them by a Justice of the peace in said county; that your petitioner and her said husband, John Hubbard, lived together agreeably, and as man and wife should, for about three years; that during this time she was treated affectionately and kindly; that for some cause, to your petitioner then unknown, the said John Hubbard, her husband aforesaid, began to ill-treat, beat, whip and abuse your petitioner in such wise as to make her life oppressive and burthensome; that this abuse of your petitioner continued from that time, with short intervals when he was less cruel and unkind to her, now and then, up to about the first of September, A.D. 1865; that prior to that time and to your petitioner’s quitting her said husband’s house, her said husband, the aforesaid John Hubbard, became intimate with one Emily, a slave then and in property of one Tobias May, of Alamance, and, as your petitioner is advised and believes, her said husband had habitually illicit and adulterous intercourse with the said Emily; that for these reasons and for the further reasons that her life with him became intolerable and unendurable, she left him and hath not cohabited with him since that time; that she is advised and believes, that the said John Hubbard, her husband aforesaid, hath since kept up his illicit, adulterous and criminal intercourse aforesaid, with the said Emily May, who is now free, and he is illegally and improperly cohabiting with the said Emily at this time, contrary to law and in despite of his vows of chastity and fidelity to your petitioner, made and entered into at the time of their marriage; that your petitioner hath resided in this county for the last twelve years and ever since she was married, and now resideth here; that the course of action hath existed ever since last September, which is about ten and a half months; that your petitioner hath kept her vows of chastity and fidelity to her said husband, both before and since this parting; that she is now leading a correct and chaste life:

Your petitioner, for the reasons aforesaid, most respectfully prays your Honor, that the bonds of matrimony, now existing between her and the said John Hubbard, her husband aforesaid, may be dissolved, and that your petitioner may have such other and further relief as the nature of her case may require and to your Honor may see merit.  She further prayeth, that the said John Hubbard be served with a copy of this libel, and a subpoena, commanding the said John Hubbard to appear at the next term of this honorable Court, to be held for the County aforesaid, at the courthouse in Greensboro; on the Fourth Monday after the Fourth Monday of September next; then and there, to plead, or answer, to this libel, and to stand to, abide by and perform the order, claims and Judgments of this Court. And an in duty-bound she will ever pray.    Scott & Scott, Attos. for Petitioner.

Divorce Records, Guilford County Records, North Carolina State Archives.